anti-war

Ron Kovic
Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

  Ron Kovic was really born on the 4th of July. Forty years ago the Vietnam vet — wounded in combat and in a wheelchair ever since — published his classic war memoir, later made into a film with Tom Cruise – Born on the Fourth of July. The new anniversary edition features a foreword by Bruce Springsteen.

In addition, Kovic - who continues his activism -  has written a new memoir entitled Hurricane Street, which chronicles the 1970s activism of the American Veterans Movement.

Official White House Photo/Pete Souza

As President Obama expresses confidence that he'll be able to work with Congress to pass a resolution authorizing military intervention in Syria, in Vermont and Northern New York, representatives and peace activists want questions answered before any action begins.

She interrupted the president during a foreign policy speech in may to demand the U.S. close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, and President Obama responded by saying she is worth paying attention to. Medea Benjamin, the co-founder of Code Pink, will be at the Troy Public Library at 100 second street this Saturday morning at 10:30 a.m. to talk about drones, Yemen and Guantanamo. Media Benjamin stopped in to WAMC this morning for an interview with Brian Shields.

    Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full-scale survey of more than thirty years of work by artist and designer Corita Kent. A teacher at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles and a civil rights, feminist, and anti-war activist, Corita, as she is commonly referred to, was one of the most popular American graphic artists of the 1960s and ’70s.

While several exhibitions have focused on Corita’s 1960s serigraphs, Someday is Now is the first major museum show to survey her entire career, including early abstractions and text pieces as well as the more lyrical works made in the 1970s and 1980s. The exhibition includes over 200 serigraph prints, as well as rarely exhibited photographs Corita used for teaching and documentary purposes.

Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum, joins us in Studio A.