archeology

In the autumn of 1777, near Saratoga, New York, an inexperienced and improvised American army led by General Horatio Gates faced off against the highly trained British and German forces led by General John Burgoyne.

The British strategy in confronting the Americans in upstate New York was to separate rebellious New England from the other colonies. Despite inferior organization and training, the Americans exploited access to fresh reinforcements of men and materiel, and ultimately handed the British a stunning defeat. The American victory, for the first time in the war, confirmed that independence from Great Britain was all but inevitable. 

Dean Snow is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Penn State University and past president of the Society for American Archaeology. His previous books include Archaeology of Native North America and The Iroquois. His new book is 1777: Tipping Point at Saratoga.

  This morning we spotlight the New Jersey Council for the Humanities and discuss how archeology can inform and expand our interpretation of historic sites.

In October, the New Jersey Council for the Humanities is celebrating National Arts & Humanities Month with a series of grant-funded events on the theme 350 Years of New Jersey.

In connection with this celebration, Dr. Jennifer Janofsky has delivered a series of talks at the Woodbury Public Library with respect to her work as curator at Red Bank Battlefield Park.

  Our next guest’s background is so fascinating – it is hard to know where to begin. Prize-winning novelist, playwright, theater director and actor Carey Harrison was born in London in February 1944, during the World War Two 'Blitz' that rained down bombs on the city. His parents, stage and screen actors Rex Harrison and Lilli Palmer, brought him to Los Angeles when he was a year old, and then to New York when he was 5.

    

  Ben Mezrich is the New York Times bestselling author of The Accidental Billionaires and Bringing Down the House in addition to ten other books. The major motion picture 21, starring Kevin Spacey, was based on Bringing Down the House. The Oscar-winning film The Social Network was adapted from The Accidental Billionaires.

When the reclusive mathematician Jeremy Grady is murdered, it’s up to his estranged brother Jack to find out why. Jack's search leads him on a far-flung journey—from Brazil, India, Peru, and beyond—as he unravels the mystery that links the Seven Wonders of the World.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Since 1991, Dr. David Starbuck, an archeologist and associate professor at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire, has been supervising an Archeology Field School through SUNY Adirondack.

  What if we woke up one morning all of the dinosaur bones in the world were gone? How would we know these iconic animals had a165-million year history on earth, and had adapted to all land-based environments from pole to pole? What clues would be left to discern not only their presence, but also to learn about their sex lives, raising of young, social lives, combat, and who ate who? What would it take for us to know how fast dinosaurs moved, whether they lived underground, climbed trees, or went for a swim?

Welcome to the world of ichnology, the study of traces and trace fossils—such as tracks, trails, burrows, nests, toothmarks, and other vestiges of behavior—and how through these remarkable clues, we can explore and intuit the rich and complicated lives of dinosaurs.