art

Breathing Lights

Nov 23, 2016
Breathing Lights

This month and last, nightly from 6pm – 10pm, Breathing Lights has been illuminating the windows of hundreds of vacant buildings in Albany, Schenectady and Troy. Breathing Lights looks to transform abandoned structures from pockets of shadows into places of warmth. 

Concentrated in neighborhoods with high levels of vacancy, Breathing Lights was a winner of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge which engages mayors to collaborate with artists on developing innovative public art projects that enrich communities and attract visitors.

But even after the closure, there will be months of programming and events to continue the conversation surrounding the issues. To tell us more – we welcome project architect Barb Nelson, Lead Artist Adam Frelin and Judie Gilmore, the project director. 


  The exhibition The Art of Seating: Two Hundred Years of American Design, organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville is currently on view at The Albany Institute of History and Art through December 31st.

 

In the show, the chair is experienced not only as a functional item, but as art -- with more than 40 unique chairs on view.

 

Public Relations Associate, Aine Leader-Nagy and Chief Curator Doug McCombs take us on a tour.

Before the rise of basic cable, Saturday mornings for many children in America were spent watching cartoons on one of three available television channels. From 1958 through the 1980s, a majority of those cartoons bore the Hanna-Barbera imprint. Creating scores of popular series such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Scooby-Doo, Super Friends, and The Smurfs, Hanna-Barbera was an animation powerhouse.

Hanna-Barbera: The Architects of Saturday Morning is the first museum exhibition on the world’s most successful animation partnership. It opens tomorrow at the Norman Rockwell Museum and runs through May 29th.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt (launching 11/15), joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

The 6th annual Made in the Berkshires festival features cutting-edge theatrical works performed as staged readings, live music, film, short stories and dance in a festival atmosphere like no other. New and innovative pieces as well as established work will be presented by local Berkshire County playwrights, actors, directors, musicians and performers.

Featured as performance blocks, Made in the Berkshires will allow audiences to enjoy the breadth and depth of the artistic talent that has landed in Berkshire County while celebrating the best in the visual and performing arts.

Professional artists and artists-in-the-making gather to share their talent with the Berkshire community. The festival will once again be curated by Hilary Somers Deely and Barbara Sims; two local artists who have helped create the rich cultural tapestry that permeates the Berkshires.

We are joined by Hilary and Barbara as well as Berkshire Theatre Group’s Artistic Director and CEO Kate Maguire.

The Tang Teaching Museum on the campus of Skidmore College in Saratoga will be having an Election Night Extravaganza - a full evening of dialogue, activities, and refreshments with live coverage of the voting results. 

The event is co-sponsored by Skidmore College clubs Democracy Matters, College Republicans, and College Democrats. This event is part of the exhibition A More Perfect Union and is free and open to the public which runs from 7 pm to midnight.

To tell us more – we welcome Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College, and curator of A More Perfect Union. Minita Sanghvi, an assistant professor in Management and Business at Skidmore College who specializes in political marketing and issues of gender and power. And Ron Seyb is here, an associate professor of political science, who specializes in the American presidency, the U.S. Congress, political psychology, and the media and politics.

Capital region resident Patrick Harbron began his career photographing the luminaries of rock and roll. Rock and Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History & Art taken from Harbron’s body of concert and portrait photography of influential musicians and groups of the 1970’s and 1980’s, captured at pivotal moments in their careers.

The exhibition features many photographs that have never been published or exhibited. Harbron photographed artists such as Blondie, Rush, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Police, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Elvis Costello early in their careers. He followed these artists to prominence and others that were already well known including The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Queen, The Who, Genesis, KISS, U2, Aerosmith, and Prince.

The exhibition will include Harbron’s collection of posters and ephemera gathered throughout his career along with guitars borrowed from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The exhibit runs from November 5th through February 12th. 


  Nick Cave is an American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist. He is best known for his Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and otherworldly.

In his new work, “Until,” Cave uses MASS MoCA’s football field-sized space to create his largest installation to date, made up of thousands of found objects and millions of beads, which will make viewers feel as if they have entered a sensory tapestry, like stepping directly inside the belly of one of his iconic Soundsuits.

For the piece Nick Cave and his curators and assistants have gathered 16,000 wind spinners; millions of plastic pony beads; thousands of ceramic birds, fruits, and animals; 1 crocodile; 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys -- and so much more.

We visited MASS MoCA during the installation of “Until” - which opened on October 15th and will be on view in North Adams, MA through early September of next year.

Nick Cave and curator Denise Markonish lead us through the exhibition.

  Boston in the 1740s: a bustling port at the edge of the British empire. A boy comes of age in a small wooden house along the Long Wharf, which juts into the harbor, as though reaching for London thousands of miles across the ocean. Sometime in his childhood, he learns to draw.

That boy was John Singleton Copley, who became, by the 1760s, colonial America’s premier painter. His brush captured the faces of his neighbors -- ordinary men like Paul Revere, John Hancock, and Samuel Adams -- who would become the revolutionary heroes of a new United States. Today, in museums across America, Copley’s brilliant portraits evoke patriotic fervor and rebellious optimism.

The artist, however, did not share his subjects’ politics. Copley’s nation was Britain; his capital, London. When rebellion sundered Britain’s empire, both kin and calling determined the painter’s allegiances. He sought the largest canvas for his talents and the safest home for his family. So, by the time the United States declared its independence, Copley and his kin were in London. He painted America’s revolution from a far shore, as Britain’s American War.

His story is told in Jane Kamensky's new book, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley.

Alan Cumming is an award-winning actor, writer, activist, and photographer.

In his new book, You Gotta Get Bigger Dreams, he shares real life stories of late-night parties; backstage anecdotes; cross-country road-trips with his dog, Honey; and poignant memories of his life, loves, family, fellow actors, and friends. 

  B. A. Shapiro brilliantly captured the world of art-theft and forgery in her critically acclaimed best-selling novel, The Art Forger.

Shapiro’s latest is The Muralist, a story about the birth of abstract-impressionism set against the backdrop of The Great Depression and the eve of World War II.

  Tomorrow at 8pm, film composer and singer-songwriter Peter Salett and illustrator Michael Arthur will be at MASS MoCA in North Adams to perform Suite for the Summer Rain and Dance of the Yellow Leaf --two related song-cycles that will be accentuated and elevated through a collaboration of the artists that melds the live music performance with live illustration projected behind the band.

The O+ Festival is a celebration of art and music that creates a bridge to access health care for artists. O+ fosters complete physical, mental and social well-being by connecting artists directly with a coalition of health care providers and health resources, in a shared vision to nurture the individual and the community.

O+ was founded in 2010 in Kingston, NY – the idea has caught on and festivals have now taken place in cities all across the country. This year’s festival in Kingston takes place October 7th, 8th, and 9th.

To tell us about this year's highlights – we are joined by: Nurse-in-charge Shannon Light, pop-up clinic director; Rocket Scientist Micah Blumenthal, creative director and co-curator of music; and Art Witch Denise Orzo, art director.

Barn painting by Tom Kerr
Tom Kerr

Here are some numbers for you: It is the 26th Anniversary of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and on October 8th, ASA will present their 15th Annual Landscapes for Landsake Art Sale & Exhibition.

The event is a fundraiser to support local farmland conservation, the show features thirty-one artists whose work is inspired by the region's working landscapes. It takes place in the historic barn at Maple Ridge in the hamlet of Coila, just west of the Village of Cambridge.

Teri Ptacek is Executive Director of the Agricultural Stewardship Association and she joins us along with Dave Horn, a former Board member and Board Chair. Dave was one of the founders of the exhibit and has been critical to the success of the show as an active volunteer for 15 years.

Willard Spiegelman is the Hughes Professor of English at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. From 1984 until 2016, he was also the editor in chief of Southwest Review. He has written many books and essays about English and American poetry. For more than a quarter century he has been a regular contributor to the Leisure & Arts pages of The Wall Street Journal.

Drawing on more than six decades' worth of lessons from his storied career as a writer and professor, Willard Spiegelman reflects with candid humor and sophistication on growing old.Senior Moments is a series of discrete essays that, when taken together, constitute the life of a man who, despite Western cultural notions of aging as something to be denied, overcome, and resisted, has continued to relish the simplest of pleasures: reading, looking at art, talking, and indulging in occasional fits of nostalgia while also welcoming what inevitably lies ahead.

  Splendor, Myth, and Vision: Nudes from the Prado is the current exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA.

The exhibition features twenty-eight Old Master paintings from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid by Titian, Peter Paul Rubens, and many others. The exhibition explores the role of the nude in European painting in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the collecting and display practices of the Spanish royalty.

We are taken on a tour of the exhibition by The Clark's Kathleen Morris, Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and curator of decorative arts; and Lara Yeager-Crasselt, interim curator of paintings and sculpture.

  Abstract Expressionism was the defining movement in American art during the years following World War II, making New York City the center of the international art scene. But, what did it mean? The drips, the spills, the splashes, the blotches of color, the wild spontaneous energy--signifying what?

Richard Klin’s new book Abstract Expressionism For Beginners will not only help you understand, but also appreciate the art of some of the most iconic figures in modern art--Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and others.

Explore their lives and artistic roots, the heady world of Greenwich Village in the 1940s and 1950s, the influence of jazz, the voices of critics, and the enduring legacy of a uniquely inspired group of artists. Richard Klin is a freelance writer and editor and the author of Something to Say: Thoughts on Art and Politics in America. He joins us along with the book's illustrator, Lilly Prince. 

Chesterwood in Stockbridge, MA is a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and was the summer home, studio and gardens of America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments, Daniel Chester French.

Its 38th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, The Nature of Glass: Contemporary Sculpture at Chesterwood 2016, featuring 24 works by 12 internationally recognized glass artists. The exhibition, curated by Jim Schantz of Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, will be on view daily until September 18.

We are joined by Donna Hassler, the Executive Director of Chesterwood, Jim Schantz from Schantz Galleries Contemporary Glass, and artist Tom Patti.  

LightField is a new visual arts nonprofit founded by NYC-based cultural producer Anna Van Lenten that launched its inaugural exhibition at the Hudson Opera House on Saturday, August 20th.

Running through September 25th, MAKING A SCENE presents the work of nine international artists who explore the boundaries of storytelling through photography, film, video, and cross-platform installations. The exhibition is accompanied by feature film screenings, public talks, and a youth photo workshop.

Anna Van Lenten joins us along with Keith Miller whose film Five Star will screen in Hudson on Saturday.

The fiction-meets-reality feature casts a real-life member of the Bloods in a story about gang life in Brooklyn. Keith Miller is an award winning filmmaker and artist based in Brooklyn and was named a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow. As part of the development and production of Five Star, he was awarded a Jerome Film and Video grant and a Rooftop Production grant. He is a professor and curator at NYU’s Gallatin School.

The Olana Partnership, in collaboration with the New York chapters of the American Institute of Architects and the American Society of Landscape Architects presents Follies, Function & Form: Imagining Olana’s Summer House. The design exhibition unites 21 visionary architects and landscape architects to address one of the great mysteries at Olana: the summer house.

In the 1886 “Plan of Olana,” a detailed blueprint of Frederic Church’s vision for his large-scale designed landscape, the plan’s details are largely accurate, yet it contains a structure labeled “Summer House” for which there is no documentary evidence.

The 21 designers have imagined Olana’s summer house and have each created one concept sketch of this structure and its environs, much in the way Frederic Church sketched to convey design and architectural ideas.

To tell us more – we welcome Mark Prezorski, Landscape Curator of the Olana Partnership. And we also meet architect Joan Krevlin who has been a partner at BKSK Architects since 1992 and Laurie Olin is a practicing landscape architect whose many award-winning projects include Bryant Park in New York, the Getty Center in Los Angeles, and the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia.


  SculptureNow is an organization that presents sculpture exhibitions and sculpture educational programs to the general public, students and vision-impaired visitors.

Remix: an installation of 29 contemporary sculptures is on view through October 31st at Edith Wharton’s The Mount - a National Historic Landmark in Lenox, MA.

Artist and SculptureNow’s Executive Director Ann Jon takes us around the show.

Gregory Crewdson

  Gregory Crewdson will discuss the making of his most recent body of work in a conversation with acclaimed author Rick Moody at The Mahaiwe on Monday, August 15th at 7pm.

The evening will include the first ever projected slideshow presentation of Cathedral of the Pines in its entirety, set to Yo La Tengo's "Night Falls on Hoboken," remixed specially for this event by Grammy-winning producer/engineer Drew Brown.

Cathedral of the Pines (2013–14) was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. The work premiered at Gagosian Gallery in New York earlier this year, and will be seen for the first time in Europe, concurrently in Brussels and Paris in September.

Rick Moody is the author of six novels, three collections of stories, a memoir, and a collection of essays on music. His most recent publication is Hotels of North America, a novel. He writes regularly about music at The Rumpus, and writes the column "Rick Moody, Life Coach," for LitHub.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The Hyde Collection, known for its old masters and historic buildings, received a major bequest of modern art and cash from Schenectady architect and art collector Werner Feibes.

 

The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, NY is presenting the exhibition Circus Circus through October 16th featuring paintings of the American circus by artists from the 1920s and 1930s alongside circus-themed marketing materials used by the Beech-Nut Packaging Company in the 1930s.

 

The circus coming to town was a highly anticipated event in small towns across America, and many artists in the twenties and thirties painted the spectacle of the parade as the circus arrived, and the excitement under the big top. The exhibition includes paintings by Jon Corbino, Ogden Pleissner and Everett Shinn.

 

Images of circus cars, animals and acrobats were also used to market food products during the 1930s. The Beech-Nut Packing Company was one of the companies to use the excitement and nostalgia of the circus to sell its products. They created magazine ads with clowns and circus animals to sell their gum.

 

This circus-themed marketing campaign culminated in the creation of Beech-Nut miniature circuses that traveled across the country in busses, and a miniature circus was displayed in their pavilion at the New York World’s Fair in 1939.

To tell us more about the exhibit we welcome Art Historian Karal Ann Marling and Museum Director and Curator Diane Forsberg.

  Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be playing their third annual gathering in Woodstock, NY this Sunday - July 31st at 12 noon. The theme will be PLAY.

The Secret City is the brainchild of impresario and Byrdcliffe Resident, Chris Wells, who moved to Woodstock three years ago and felt the small town with its cultural history, inclusiveness and love of community were a perfect setting for this tribal art gathering.

The Secret City combines art, food, music, storytelling, meditation, singing, performance and community interaction in an event that is part tent revival, part ceremony, part salon.

For their Woodstock gathering they’ll present musical guest Eric Redd, visual art by Jacinta Bunnell, roller derby troupe The Hudson Valley Horrors, food offering by LaGusta of New Paltz, a performance by Percussion Orchestra of Kingston and Energy Dance Company, a reading by Martha Frankel, songs by The Secret City Singers and The Secret City Band and a story by Chris Wells. We welcome Chris and artist Jacinta Bunnell.

  Spencertown Academy Arts Center is presenting the new exhibit: “Mysterious and Unexpected: The Merger of Art and Science.” There will be an opening reception on Saturday, July 23rd from 4-6PM and the show will remain on display through August 14th.

Curator Barbara Lax Kranz says the exhibit displays the work of six artists who incorporate science to create their art. We will meet two of the featured artists this morning.

Often inspired by current issues in science, Carrie Crane’s recent work uses the tools of Knowledge Visualization (graphs, maps, and diagrams) to address issues of ambiguity and subjectivity in visual communication.

Karen Schoolman is an abstract painter, a student of botanical illustration, and a physician. A packet of 50-year-old x-rays of her mother’s leg inspired her current artwork.

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College invites the public to its annual Frances Day, a community open house from noon to 6:00 pm Saturday, July 9, full of art, art-making, food, music, and more in honor of the museum's namesake.

Visitors can get an up-close view of what goes on behind the scenes in the Museum's Collections areas, and get a guided look at the exhibitions on view: A More Perfect Union, featuring Mel Ziegler's Flag Exchange, with flags collected from all 50 states; the photography exhibition Borrowed Light: Selections from the Jack Shear CollectionLiz Collins — Energy Field, a community lounge installation featuring a new work by artist E.V. Day; Elevator Music 30: Critter & Guitari, in which visitors can make their own music; and the student-curated exhibition According to What, which explores fact and fiction in contemporary art.

Ian Berry, is the Dayton Director of the Tang.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen:Our Kind of Traitor

Upcoming:
Dust Bowl Faeries - Upbeat on the Roof/Tang Teaching Museum & Gallery, Saratoga Springs, Friday 7/8
Boston Symphony Orchestra with violinist Joshua Bell (Opening Night: Prokofiev, Saint-Saens) - Tanglewood, Lenox, Mass., Friday 7/8
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Friday (8 PM)-Saturday (2 and 8 PM), 7/8-9
Wussy - The Low Beat, Albany, Friday 7/9
The Muppets Take Manhattan - Proctors, Schenectady, Sunday 7/10 (10:30 AM & 1 PM)
The Hydes & Rembrandt - The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, opens Sunday 7/10 (exhibit continues through 10/2)
Steely Dan, Steve Winwood - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, Sunday, 7/10
Blood Sweat & Tears feat. Bo Bice & Dylan Elise, Super 400 - Empire State Plaza, Albany, Wednesday 7/13 (5-9 PM)
NRBQ - Helsinki Hudson, Hudson, Wednesday 7/13
Jim Gaffigan - Times Union Center, Albany, Wednesday 7/13

New Movies: Weiner Dog, The Secret Life of Pets, Mike & Dave Need Wedding Dates, The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma & the Silk Road Ensemble

Universal Collection: A Mark Dion Project
Chip Porter / Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College

  This Spring, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY has hosted Mark Dion as Vassar artist-in-residence.

Dion is a New York and Pennsylvania-based visual artist known for his “cabinets of curiosities” that incorporate found objects into site-specific installations.

He co-taught a course with anthropology professor Anne Pike-Tay, culminating in a work comprised of items drawn from the collections of the Art Center, Special Collections, and Vassar College Artifacts Project. This wealth of resources includes materials as diverse as nineteenth-century scientific instruments, Native American objects, examples of taxidermy, sculpture, geological specimens, and antique books.

Universal Collection: A Mark Dion Project will be on view at the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY through December 11th.

The Mount
David-Dashiell / edithwharton.org

  The Mount is a turn-of-the-century home, designed and built by Edith Wharton in 1902 in Lenox, MA. A National Historic Landmark, today The Mount is a cultural center that celebrates the intellectual, artistic and humanitarian legacy of Edith Wharton.

The Mount’s executive director, Susan Wissler, joins us now to tell us what they have coming up this summer. 

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