The Lower Adirondack Arts Council – better known as LARAC – will be holding their 43rd annual June Arts Festival this coming weekend in Downtown Glens Falls.

The Festival is one of the premier summer events in the southern Adirondack Region, drawing crowds of 20,000. It features about 200 exhibitors offering shoppers a variety of products such as jewelry, home items, food items, fine art, textiles, garden decorations, and more. The Festival takes place rain or shine, in Downtown Glens Falls’ City Park.

The festival also includes not for profit booths, arts demonstrations, children’s activities, food concessions, and live entertainment by local musicians.

To tell us more we welcome: Phil Casabona - Festivals and Shop Coordinator, Jenny Hutchinson - Gallery Curator and Program Coordinator and Ellen Butz – LARAC’s Executive Director.

  This Saturday, May 16th, Greene County Council on the Arts (GCCA) will present a fundraiser at Catskill Mill in Catskill, NY.

The fundraiser, entitled ‘between the lines,’ will be presented in three parts: an auction, a dance performance, and a dance party.

Here to tell us more are Nancey Rosensweig, GCCA board-member, midwife, and dancer and Kay Stamer, Executive Director of GCCA.

Ellie Ga At EMPAC

May 5, 2015

  Ellie Ga is closing out the Spring EMPAC season on May 7 and 8. Ellie Ga's multimedia essays are part field dispatch, part artist’s notebook, part home-movie, part poem.

On Thursday, May 7, at 8PM, Ga will perform The Fortunetellers, a narrative performance inspired by her six-month residency on the Tara, a research boat drifting near the North Pole to gather scientific data.

On Friday, May 8, at 8PM, she will perform Eureka, a lighthouse play - Commissioned by EMPAC, Eureka centers on the Great Lighthouse of Alexandria and recounts Ga’s journey, beginning in 2012 when she joined a marine archaeology program at Alexandria University in pursuit of the lighthouse.

Ellie Ga joins us now along with Victoria Brooks, a Curator at EMPAC.

  The Thomas Cole National Historic Site and The Olana Partnership/Olana State Historic Site announced today that they will co-host a landmark exhibition of contemporary art to highlight the pivotal role that the two historic properties – and the artists who lived and worked there – played in shaping America’s culture of contemporary art. The exhibition – “River Crossings: Contemporary Art Comes Home” – will open on May 3rd and run through November 1st.

  The exhibition is curated by Stephen Hannock, the celebrated painter, and Jason Rosenfeld, PhD, the art historian who recently curated two enormously popular exhibitions at Tate Britain in London and the National Gallery in Washington, DC.

Here to tell us more are Betsy Jacks, Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site and Mark Prezorski, Landscape Curator at Olana.

  In December 1969, the Museum of Fine Arts announced the acquisition of an unknown and un-catalogued painting attributed to Raphael. Boston’s coup made headlines around the world. Soon afterward, an Italian art sleuth began investigating the details of the painting’s export from Italy, challenging the museum’s right to ownership. Simultaneously, experts on both sides of the Atlantic debated its authenticity.

Belinda Rathbone, daughter of Perry Rathbone, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston from 1955 to 1972, will discuss her book: The Boston Raphael: A Mysterious Painting, an Embattled Museum in an Era of Change, and a Daughter’s Search for the Truth at the Clark Art Institute on Sunday, April 26th at 3 pm.

  The Clark Art Institute's collection includes around 300 teacups from different eras and continents. Artist Molly Hatch gained access to the pieces and her collected illustrations of them are gathered in the new book, A Teacup Collection: Paintings of Porcelain Treasures.

The Clark will celebrate the book beginning at 1:30pm this Sunday – with a tea in their Café Seven, an author’s talk at 3pm in The Clark Center, and a book signing in the Museum Store at 4pm.

Molly Hatch joins us now to tell us more and she is joined by Kathleen M. Morris, the Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and Curator of Decorative Arts. She worked with Molly on the book and wrote the forward.

© 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  The first US exhibition to concentrate on artist Andy Warhol’s book work, Warhol by the Book opened at the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) March 7 and will be on view through August 16.

We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we'll be talking about the Byrdcliffe Arts Colony in Woodstock, New York, the role it played in the arts and crafts movement in upstate New York, and plans to develop an app for visitors and history enthusiasts around the site.

We're joined by Thomas A. Guiler is a PhD Candidate in American History in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Thomas is also the curator and project manager for UpstateHistorical which uses smart phone and GPS technology to provide walking tours and public history infrastructure to key locales across Upstate New York with audio, visual, and textual accompaniment.


  The Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, based in Brattleboro, Vermont, is an independent, non-collecting museum which showcases a plethora of contemporary art from regional artists to international icons alike.

On Saturday March 14th, five new exhibits opened at the museum. Collectively, three exhibits serve as an exploration fiber art and the other two showcase the work of southern Vermont artists.

They are entitled: Gathering Threads, Dialogue: Lindenfeld + Lindenfeld, Children of the Oasis, Donald Saaf: Contemporary Folk Tales, and Love, Labor, Worship: The People of Basin Farm.

Here to tell us more about the museum’s new exhibits is director of the BMAC, Danny Lichtenfeld.

  During and just after World Wars I and II in Britain - in an era known as the Machine Age, the tumultuous political climate and the prevalence of industry and mechanization influenced the art created at that time.

Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection is a new exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA. The exhibition features a wide range of lithographs, dry points, woodcut prints and linocuts produced during the period exploring themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity.