art

WAMC Programs
3:06 pm
Tue April 9, 2013

The Book Show #1290 - Tara Conklin

    In Tara Conklin's debut novel, The House Girl: A Novel, two remarkable women, separated by more than a century, live lives that unexpectedly intertwine.

2004: Lina Sparrow is an ambitious young lawyer working on a historic class-action lawsuit seeking reparations for the descendants of American slaves.

1852: Josephine is a seventeen-year-old house slave who tends to the mistress of a Virginia tobacco farm—an aspiring artist named Lu Anne Bell.

The Roundtable
11:02 am
Fri April 5, 2013

A Bard's Eye View - Djelloul Marbrook

    April is National Poetry Month. In this edition of A Bard's Eye View, WAMC's resident poet, Paul Elisha, sits down for a conversation with Djelloul Marbrook. They discuss Djelloul's work, Brushstrokes and glances.

Djelloul Marbrook's book of poems, Far from Algiers, won the 2007 Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize and the 2010 International Book Award in poetry. He worked for many years as a reporter and editor for newspapers including the Providence Journal, Elmira Star-Gazette, Baltimore Sun, Winston-Salem Journal, Washington Star, and others. He lives in New York s mid-Hudson Valley with his wife Marilyn.

The Roundtable - Book Picks
10:10 am
Tue March 26, 2013

Book Picks - Battenkill Books

  Connie Brooks from Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY is in Studio A this week with a list of great titles.

List after the break. 

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Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Mon February 25, 2013

"New Blue and White"

And Then It Was Still II - Giselle Hicks

    "Blue and white" means, at its simplest, cobalt pigment applied to white clay. Over the course of a millennium, blue-and-white porcelain has become one of the most recognized types of ceramic production worldwide.

The exhibition, “New Blue and White” currently on display at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston explores the ways in which contemporary makers, working in ceramics as well as other media ranging from fiber to furniture to glass, have explored this rich body of material culture.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 30, 2013

The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance

In the early 1500s, the city of Florence, Italy, created a competition between two larger than life Renaissance figures: Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo. To glorify the political power of the Florentine Republic, the city commissioned these two artists to paint frescoes on opposite walls in an important public building.

In a new book, The Lost Battles: Leonardo, Michelangelo, and the Artistic Duel That Defined the Renaissance, art historian Jonathan Jones details the lives of these men, the competition between them and how their contrasting visions of mankind continue to influence art and culture today. 

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Mon January 28, 2013

The Carle Museum's 10th Anniversary

 It is the Carle Museum's tenth anniversary, and they are celebrating with some very special exhibitions, including the first major exhibition from their permanent collection (100 pieces reflecting 100 years of picture book history) and an exhibition of many illustrations from the classic, Charlotte's Web.

The sale of the Charlotte’s Web drawings last October caused quite a stir. Everyone connected with the world of children’s book art was thrilled by the strong prices. Thus, to celebrate their purchase, Garth Williams’s 100th birthday, the 60th anniversary of Charlotte’s Web, and the Museum’s 10th year, the Carle is assembling the exhibition, Some Book! Some Art!: Selected Drawings by Garth Williams for Charlotte’s Web, which comprises of approximately 30 finished drawings.

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Commentary & Opinion
3:30 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Rabbi Dan Ornstein - Lessons at the Clark

The Clark Art Museum once hosted an exhibition of the works of the great French artist Jacques Louis David, whose magnificent scenes chronicled the French revolution and the reign of Napoleon Bonaparte.  David was a close friend of Napoleon’s as well as his official painter. Napoleon was not at all a modest man.  He once declared, “Power is my mistress,” and looking at his life, we know that he meant it.  A brigadier general at twenty four, Napoleon’s vision of himself was matched fully by his ambitious successes.  Since it’s in the best interests of a court painter to flatter the rulers that he paints, David spared no effort to portray Napoleon, a man of no small ego and accomplishment, as smarter, braver, taller, and stronger than everyone around him.  My favorite example of David’s flattery is his painting of Napoleon crossing the Alps to defeat the Austrians.  Napoleon is dressed regally, exuding confidence, courage and power.  As his troops move forward in the background, he takes a moment from battle to look imperiously at the artist and at us. To lend even greater mightiness and grandeur to Napoleon’s image, David painted him on a sleek, muscular, white battle horse, an awesome example of natural beauty and power.

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The Roundtable
9:45 am
Thu December 20, 2012

"The Art Forger" by B.A. Shapiro

B.A. Shapiro has written a page-turning thriller about stolen art and masterful fakes in her debut novel The Art Forger, using one of the world's most notorious unsolved art crimes as a backdrop.

Two robbers in 1990 got away with 13 masterworks from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, tying up guards and escaping with works by artists that included Vermeer, Rembrandt and Degas. More than 20 years later: No arrests, no art.

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Arts & Culture
10:35 am
Wed December 19, 2012

From Process to Print: Graphic Works by Romare Bearden at The Hyde Collection

Romare Bearden, American, 1911-1988, Falling Star, 1980, lithograph, 23 1/2 x 18 in. (image), Edition 175. © Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

From Process to Print: Graphic Works by Romare Bearden presents over seventy-five lithographs, etchings, collograph plates, screenprints, drypoints, monoprints, and engravings; all created over a span of thirty years. Together they demonstrate how Romare Bearden, considered one of America's most important and inventive artists, experimented, innovated, and collaborated on his journey toward mastery of the print medium.

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Vox Pop
3:08 pm
Wed December 5, 2012

Vox Pop : The Copyright Forum : 12/5/12

Today on Vox Pop, we look at where art and law meet with the Copyright Forum. Our gyests are intellectual property lawyer Paul Rapp and medical illustrator Bill Westwood. WAMC’s Alan Chartock hosts.

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