art

Made in the Berkshires

Oct 9, 2013

Curated by Hilary Somers Deely and Barbara Sims, Made in the Berkshires is a locally-grown festival of new works including theatre, film, dance, poetry, music, short stories, performance and visual art.  

The 2013 Made in the Berkshires Festival being held from October 11 to October 13 at The Colonial Theatre, The Garage, and The Unicorn Theatre. Hilary and Barbara join us to tell us more.

  The Agricultural Stewardship Association (ASA) is a community-supported land trust dedicated to protecting our local farmland from encroaching development, working together with interested landowners and active supporters.

They will be holding their 12th Annual Art Exhibition to benefit farmland conservation this weekend at Maple Ridge in Cambridge. ASA Executive Director Teri Ptacek joins us to tell us more.

    IndieGoGo is the largest global crowdfunding platform, campaigns have launched around the world with millions of dollars being distributed every week due to contributions made by the Indiegogo community. The company was launched in 2008 and is headquartered in San Francisco, with offices in Los Angeles and New York.

  If "IndieGoGo" and "crowdfunding" sound like so much gobbledygook to you - Film, Web & Video Manager at Indiegogo John Trigonis, joins us now to explain what crowdfunding is all about. John is the author of Crowdfunding for Filmmakers and he will be moderating the IndieGoGo panel at this year’s Woodstock Film Festival.

    Modern life is a sea of images. With so much visual data bombarding us - from personal devices to mass media - our brains must rapidly adapt to make sense of it all.

In her new book, Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars, Camille Paglia returns to the subject that made her famous, situating our current visual environment within the scope of all of art history.

Camille Paglia is an American teacher and social critic. She has been a professor at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, since 1984.

    The exhibition, Winslow Homer: Making Art Making History is currently on display at The Clark Art Museum in Williamstown, MA through September 8th. It features more than 200 works by Homer - spanning his career and including paintings, watercolors, drawings, etchings, lithographs, chromolithographs,wood engravings, photographs, correspondence, and books.

Homer began his career as an illustrator for the popular press, providing pictures of current events for newspapers in Boston and New York. Historians use these, as well as his paintings and watercolors, to illustrate mid-nineteenth-century 

  political and economic developments. Art historians, too, use the works to explore not only Homer’s life and endeavors, but also to consider broader questions such as the rise of the critical press, the quest for a national style, and the ramifications of the expanding nineteenth-century art market.

Michael Cassin - the Director for The Clark’s Center for Education in the Visual Arts - takes us on an audio tour of the exhibition.

    Community Access to the Arts is 20-years old this year. Based in Great Barrington, the non-profit was born when Sandy Newman coordinated one weaving workshop for 12 women with disabilities from The Riverbrook Residence.

Today, CATA offers over 1000 individual arts workshops annually in its Great Barrington Studio as well as in 30 different health and human service organizations. 22 local artists are employed as faculty along with 6 full-time and 2 part-time staff.

There is a lot going on at CATA this anniversary year, founder Sandy Newman is here to tell us more along with Program Coordinator Bobbie Fachini.

    This summer Norman Rockwell Museum pays tribute to Walt Disney, another American icon of the 20th Century, with a special exhibition celebrating the 75th anniversary of the acclaimed visual storyteller’s first feature-length animated film. “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: The Creation of a Classic” will be on view at the Museum through October 27, 2013.

The exhibition celebrates Walt Disney’s vision and the artistry of his dedicated staff, illustrating how they shaped and defined an entirely new American art form through their creation of this groundbreaking film.

Joining us is exhibit Curator and Creative Director of the Walt Disney Animation Research Library, Lella Smith who guides a staff of 24 in exhibiting, archiving, and digitizing the library’s collections. We also welcome, the Chief Curator for the Norman Rockwell Museum, Stephanie Plunkett.

    

  The Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College presents “Dannielle Tegeder: Painting in the Extended Field,” the artist’s first solo museum exhibition - through July 28th.

The exhibition features new works created specifically for the Wellin, including a site-specific, 70-foot wall painting installation; a 4 x 10 foot, glass and metal mobile; and a series of large-scale paintings and drawings.

Museum director Tracy Adler curated the show and she joins us to tell us more about it and about other upcoming exhibitions at The Wellin.

    Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full-scale survey of more than thirty years of work by artist and designer Corita Kent. A teacher at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles and a civil rights, feminist, and anti-war activist, Corita, as she is commonly referred to, was one of the most popular American graphic artists of the 1960s and ’70s.

While several exhibitions have focused on Corita’s 1960s serigraphs, Someday is Now is the first major museum show to survey her entire career, including early abstractions and text pieces as well as the more lyrical works made in the 1970s and 1980s. The exhibition includes over 200 serigraph prints, as well as rarely exhibited photographs Corita used for teaching and documentary purposes.

Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum, joins us in Studio A.

    Stephen Dietemann is an architect, artist, musician, and writer living in Great Barrington. He is an expert at green design and making spaces simultaneously economical and exciting. He also writes a monthly column for Architecture and Arcadia Magazine.

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