Arts & Culture

The Rep/Douglas C. Liebig

“If you made a list of your favorite plays or musicals that might make you think of the holidays, it’s doubtful that the Lerner and Lowe musical, “Camelot” would make your top 10. Or, for that matter, the top 25.

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WAMC's Ian Pickus and resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel switch seats for a quiz about famous mayors.

Rogovoy Report 12/2/16

Dec 2, 2016

The weekend’s cultural highlights in the region include a chamber concert featuring works about unrequited love; a documentary performance artwork about life in a Mexican border town; a concert of seasonal music by an all-star ensemble of acoustic roots musicians; a communal, interactive new-music holiday parade; and a whole lot more.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about female composers and begin a series of segments sharing the music of Thea Musgrave.

To have been alive during the last sixty years is to have lived with the music of Paul Simon. The boy from Queens scored his first hit record in 1957, just months after Elvis Presley ignited the rock era. As the songwriting half of Simon & Garfunkel, his work helped define the youth movement of the '60s.

On his own in the '70s, Simon made radio-dominating hits. He kicked off the '80s by reuniting with Garfunkel to perform for half a million New Yorkers in Central Park. Five years later, Simon’s album Graceland sold millions and spurred an international political controversy. And it doesn’t stop there.

Simon has also lived one of the most vibrant lives of modern times; a story replete with tales of Carrie Fisher, Leonard Bernstein, Bob Dylan, Woody Allen, Shelley Duvall, Nelson Mandela, drugs, depression, marriage, divorce, and more. A life story with the scope and power of an epic novel, Peter Ames Carlin’s new book - Homeward Bound is the first major biography of one of the most influential popular artists in American history. 

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

David Bianculli is a guest host and TV critic on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. A contributor to the show since its inception, he has been a TV critic since 1975. From 1993 to 2007, Bianculli was a TV critic for the New York Daily News.

Darwin had his theory of evolution, and David Bianculli has his.

Bianculli's theory has to do with the concept of quality television: what it is and, crucially, how it got that way. In tracing the evolutionary history of our progress toward a Platinum Age of Television - our age, the era of The Sopranos and Breaking Bad and Mad Men and The Wire and Homeland and Girls—he focuses on the development of the classic TV genres. In each genre, he selects five key examples of the form, tracing its continuities and its dramatic departures and drawing on exclusive and in-depth interviews with many of the most famed auteurs in television history.

David Thomson is a film critic and frequent contributor to the New York Times, the Guardian, and more. He is the author of The Biographical Dictionary of Film, now in its sixth edition, and Moments that Made the Movies.

His latest book, Television: A Biography celebrates and analyzes the stories being told on the small screen.

The art of hula is thriving in cities all over the country and the world, but it is not always understood.

In The Natives Are Restless, journalist Constance Hale presents the largely untold story of the dance tradition, using the twin keyholes of Kumu Patrick Makuakane (a Hawai‘i-born, San Francisco–based hula master), and his 350-person arts organization (Na Lei Hulu i ka Wekiu).

In the background, she weaves the poignant story of an ancient people and the resilience of their culture. In the foreground, she tells the story of an electrifying new form of hula that has emerged from a restless generation of artists like Makuakane.

Alice Guy-Blaché was the first female film director and the first film studio owner. She made her first film, by her own account, in 1896 at age 23. She went on to write, direct, or produce more than 1,000 films.

Upstate Women in Film and Television (UPWIFT) will present a selection of films by Alice Guy-Blaché at the Rosendale Theater in Rosendale, NY on Wednesday, November 30th; at The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday, December 2nd; and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, December 11th.

Part of the presentations will be a Skype Q&A with producer and director Pamela Green, who is currently making a feature full-length documentary film about Alice Guy-Blaché for which she has been conducting extensive research for the past five years.

Pamela Green joins us now along with Hanna Sawka, President of UPWIFT.

Rob Edelman: Different Films

Nov 28, 2016

Right now, the heavy hitters-- translation: the high-profile Academy Award hopefuls-- are debuting in theaters. Two of the very best are as different as old-fashioned Hollywood fantasy-gloss and slap-in-your-face reality.

WAMC's Ian Pickus and resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel settle in for a Black Friday show about invisibilia.

Audrey Kupferberg: The Crown

Nov 25, 2016

Netflix has a new, fact-based series called The Crown. It’s about the British royals in the mid-20th Century, including their complicated family relationships as well as their interaction with the most influential leaders of British government. 

Simon McBurney in The Encounter
Robbie Jack

The Encounter - conceived of, directed by, and starring, Simon McBurney is currently running at the Golden Theater in New York City. McBurney is a multi-Olivier Award-winning, Tony and SAG Award-nominated actor, writer, director and one of Europe’s most original theater makers. He is co-founder and artistic director of Complicite.

The one-man play tells the true story of National Geographic photographer Loren McIntyre in 1969 - lost in Brazil as he encounters the Mayoruna - a remote people whose ancient traditions are uninfluenced by the western world. In The Encounter, McBurney also shares the story of the creation of this unique piece of theater.

Molding and stretching the classic artform of storytelling, McBurney and The Encounter team use specific and immersive binaural audio technology and sound design. Each member of the audience wears headphones which create an experience that uses their ears to trick their brain into telling their body and comprehension that events are happening that - in reality - aren’t; a voice from over your shoulder, a mosquito in your face, a fire nearby, a warm breath a little too nearby.

Breathing Lights

Nov 23, 2016
Breathing Lights

This month and last, nightly from 6pm – 10pm, Breathing Lights has been illuminating the windows of hundreds of vacant buildings in Albany, Schenectady and Troy. Breathing Lights looks to transform abandoned structures from pockets of shadows into places of warmth. 

Concentrated in neighborhoods with high levels of vacancy, Breathing Lights was a winner of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge which engages mayors to collaborate with artists on developing innovative public art projects that enrich communities and attract visitors.

But even after the closure, there will be months of programming and events to continue the conversation surrounding the issues. To tell us more – we welcome project architect Barb Nelson, Lead Artist Adam Frelin and Judie Gilmore, the project director. 

Candid Camera’s 8 Decades of Smiles! with Peter Funt will be presented at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington on Friday night. Peter’s stage comedy is blended with clips, quips and behind-the-scenes tales from the show’s funniest moments.

Candid Camera holds a unique place in entertainment history as the only show to have produced new episodes in each of the last eight decades – from Allen Funt’s debut in 1948 through Peter’s recent run on TV Land.

The stage show incorporates the best Candid Camera clips in a fast-paced, laugh-filled romp through the decades. Peter’s topical humor is blended with audience participation and special surprises to make the show a great night of fun.

Peter joined his dad as co-host in the 1980s and took over as host in the 90s. His syndicated newspaper column appears regularly in the Berkshire Eagle.

Rob Edelman: Black Life

Nov 21, 2016

A number of high-quality, deservedly-acclaimed films that illuminate the lives of black Americans are arriving in movie theaters. They include MOONLIGHT, one of the very best films of the year: an intimate, moving character study about Chiron, a young black male who is an outsider in his world.

Any Questions #273

Nov 18, 2016

WAMC's Ian Pickus and resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel are back for a hoppin' good quiz.

Audrey Kupferberg: 'Arrival' And 'Hacksaw Ridge'

Nov 18, 2016

Two new films are playing in local theaters this month.  One is an innovative sci-fi feature called ARRIVAL starring Amy Adams, Jeremy Renner, and Forest Whitaker.  Adams gets most of the screen time as Dr. Louise Banks, a brilliant university linguist, who is employed by the U.S. military to translate the language of aliens.  The story involves twelve alien spacecraft that land in a dozen locales across the earth.  The extraterrestrials, which are called Heptapods, are nothing like humans in their appearance, but they do seem to be capable of communication.  While they look absolutely primordial, they have powers that we on earth have not yet acquired.

Rogovoy Report For 11/18/16

Nov 18, 2016

The weekend’s cultural highlights in the region include a world premiere of new music by Magnetic Fields; the return of a husband-and-wife new wave duo; a Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic; a composer sharing thoughts on classical music’s glass ceiling; a concert of contemporary music from China; and a whole lot more.

Between stressing about his theater friends and reconciling his complicated feelings about an inconsistently wonderful New York City, Tony Award–winning playwright and Pulitzer finalist Richard Greenberg also maintains a reputation for being something of a hermit.

In Rules for Others to Live By, he shares lessons from his highly successful writing career, observations from two long decades of residence on a three-block stretch of Manhattan, and musings from a complicated and occasionally taxing social life.

His new play, The Babylon Line, is in previews at the Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center, it will open on December 5.


  The exhibition The Art of Seating: Two Hundred Years of American Design, organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville is currently on view at The Albany Institute of History and Art through December 31st.

 

In the show, the chair is experienced not only as a functional item, but as art -- with more than 40 unique chairs on view.

 

Public Relations Associate, Aine Leader-Nagy and Chief Curator Doug McCombs take us on a tour.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Alton Brown is the author of the James Beard award winning, I’m Just Here for the Food, and the New York Times bestselling sequence, Good Eats, and host of TV’s Cutthroat Kitchen, Camp Cutthroat, Iron Chef America and Good Eats on Food Network.

His new live show Eat Your Science is a follow-up to the smash Edible Inevitable tour. Brown is adding a slew of fresh ingredients including new puppets, songs and bigger and potentially more dangerous experiments.

The show will be at UPAC in Kingston, NY on Thursday, November 17 at 8:00 pm before it plays Broadway's Barrymore Theatre November 22-27.

Since his first recordings in 1955, Johnny Cash has been an icon in the music world. Now comes a collection of his as-yet-unpublished poems adding to his already prolific number of original songs: Forever Words: The Unknown Poems.

In these words, we see the world through Cash’s eyes, his reflection upon his own interior reality, frailties and strengths alike. The poetry reveals his depth of understanding; both of the world around him and within. Coming from purely American and gospel traditions of song writing, Cash reflects upon love, pain, freedom, and mortality.

John Carter Cash, who has been involved in music all his life, is an accomplished and award-winning record producer as well as a singer-songwriter and recording artist. The only son to Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, he is the author of three children’s books, and a biography of his father, one of his mother, and a fantasy novel, Lupus Rex

In a career that has spanned over sixty years, Robert Wagner has witnessed the twilight of the Golden Age of Hollywood and the rise of television, becoming a beloved star in both film and TV. During this time, he became acquainted, both professionally and socially, with many of the greatest female screen personalities of all time.

His new book, I Loved Her in the Movies: Memories of Hollywood’s Legendary Actresses, gives us an account of the charisma of these women on film.  Among Wagner's subjects are Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Loretta Young, Raquel Welch, Glenn Close, and the two actresses whom he ultimately married, Natalie Wood and Jill St. John.

Robert Wagner is the star of such films as A Kiss Before DyingThe Longest DayThe Pink Panther, and most recently, the Austin Powers franchise. On television, he starred in It Takes a Thief (with Fred Astaire), Switch (with Eddie Albert and Sharon Gless), and Hart to Hart (with Stefanie Powers). 

The Berkshire Concert Choir was formed in 1977 with the merger of the Stockbridge Singers, Inc. and The Cantata Choir of South Congregational Church of Pittsfield. The Choir is a membership organization open to all who enjoy singing and are willing to devote one evening a week to rehearsals.

The Choir presents Carl Orff's cantata, Carmina Burana, on Saturday, November 19 at 7:30 pm in the Boland Theater at Berkshire Community College, 1350 West Street, Pittsfield. 

To tell us more, we welcome Paula Nuss, Artistic Director, Marilyn Gerhard, tenor and President of the choir, and Francis Stone, bass and board member.

Rob Edelman: Andrzej Wajda

Nov 14, 2016

Andrzej Wajda is the best-known and most revered Polish filmmaker of his generation. His films are daring, provocative, and personal. Plus, many are decidedly political in that they focus on individuals who valiantly resist repression or ponder the realities of war and heroism.

Any Questions #272

Nov 11, 2016

WAMC's Ian Pickus and resident quizzer Mike Nothnagel are back with this week's show.

Rogovoy Report For 11/11/16

Nov 11, 2016

The weekend’s cultural highlights in the region include a Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright at the microphone and piano; a world-renowned jazz trumpeter inaugurating a new venue; the editor of a new collection of essays on womanhood; a museum exhibition of Saturday morning cartoon classics; and a whole lot more.

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