attorney

Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney's office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America's foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Her new sleuth, Devlin Quick, takes inspiration from Nancy Drew. The first Devlin Quick Mystery is out now, it's entitled Into the Lion's Den. In the novel, someone has stolen a page from a rare book in the New York Public Library. At least, that’s what Devlin’s friend Liza thinks she’s seen, but she can’t be sure. Any other kid might not see a crime here, but Devlin Quick is courageous and confident, and she knows she has to bring this man to justice—even if it means breathlessly racing around the city to collect evidence. 

  Corporate attorney, Rich Honen, pays us a visit once a month with some thoughts on headlines from the business world.

This month we'll speak with him about Jeff Bezos and Amazon and The Iran Deal.

Rich Honen is with Phillips Lytle LLP where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

  Corporate attorney, Rich Honen, pays us a visit once a month with some thoughts on headlines from the business world.

Today he is here to discuss a trend over the last 50 years - to increase the administration and ancillary functions of everything at the expense of the core functions.

To help us sort this all out – we welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

  Corporate attorney, Rich Honen, pays us a visit once a month with some thoughts on headlines from the business world.

Today he is here to talk about the rise in American consumer debt. To help us sort this all out – we welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

  Corporate attorney, Rich Honen, pays us a visit once a month with some thoughts on headlines from the business world. Today he is here to share to talk about the industry of poverty.

To help us sort this all out – we welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

  Corporate attorney, Rich Honen, pays us a visit once a month with some thoughts on headlines from the business world.

Today he is here to share the good and bad of current economic indicators.

To help us sort this all out – we welcome Rich Honen - with Phillips Lytle LLP, where he is the partner in charge of the Albany office.

E. Stewart Jones

On January 1st, the Capital Region heralded the arrival of a new law firm.

E. Stewart Jones Hacker Murphy, LLP has 14 lawyers, 12 staff members and three offices, in Troy, Saratoga and Latham.  E. Stewart Jones and Jim Hacker started talking about joining forces about a year and half ago.  Jones, who wanted to preserve his firm's legacy,  said he had been approached in the past about merger possibilities, but didn't find the right fit.  Until Hacker Murphy came along.

A state report shows the almost 700 attorneys defending the poor averaged 680 cases last year, nearly double the recommended limit, even though their ranks and funding increased from the year before.

The Office of Indigent Legal Services says Wednesday the caseload average in the 57 counties outside New York City declined slightly from 719 the year before.

Meanwhile, the number of attorneys rose by almost 50 and their funding rose to $175 million, an increase of about $9 million.

  Legal biographies embrace the noble, the solemn, and the heroic. The authors who write them walk a fine line between a dramatic and engrossing tale and the reach for literary glory. Examples include legal titans Louis Brandeis, Edward Benett Williams, and Sonia Sotomayor. But, for every Clarence Darrow wanna-be that ever galvanized a jury, there toils the counselor whose contribution to the legal arts is just as brilliant – but goes unnoticed - and whose dedicated career and personal story is the reality show of the everyday courtroom.

Veteran New York Attorney Robert Layton has brought one of these stories to light in his new book, Going on My Own: 21st Century Legal Tales: A Memoir of Life as an International Lawyer.

The segment begins with Layton explaining how the book came about.

  Susannah Sheffer, Project Director at Murder Victims' Families for Human Rights, will be speaking tonight at SUNY Albany’s School of Criminal Justice about her new book: Fighting for Their Lives: Inside the Experience of Capital Defense Attorneys.

The book tackles such questions as: How do attorneys who represent clients facing the death penalty cope with the stress and trauma of their work? Through conversations with twenty of the most experienced and dedicated post-conviction capital defenders in the United States.

What it is like for these capital defenders in their last visits or phone calls with clients who are about to be taken to the execution chamber? Or the next mornings, in their lives with their families, in their dreams and flashbacks and moments alone in the car?

Today’s event is at 5:30 at Husted Hall Amphitheatre.

    Barry Siegel joins us to talk about his new book: Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom.

In the book, Siegel chronicles the dramatic story of an Arizona man named Bill Macumber who, until his unexpected release from prison last November, had spent more than half his life behind bars.

Guilt By Degrees

May 18, 2012

Marcia Rachel Clark is an American prosecutor, author, and television correspondent who gained fame as the head prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson murder case. We welcome Marcia Clark and speak with her about her second D.A. Rachel Knight novel, Guilt by Degrees .