audio tour

  Each region of the country has its own distinctive history and culture that set it apart from others. The Capital Region of New York—consisting of Albany, Rensselaer, Schenectady, and Saratoga Counties— is no different.

Last month, The Albany Institute of History and Art opened an exhibition celebrating the heritage of this area. The Capital Region in 50 Objects will be on view through April 3rd.

The exhibition was planned in partnership with the Times Union and was made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts. Additional funding was provided by the New York Council for the Humanities and the Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area.

The Albany Institute of History and Art is just down the road from our studio in Albany. I went there to talk about the exhibition with Chief Curator Doug McCombs and Curator Diane Shewchuk.

  Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) by James McNeill Whistler is one of the most renowned works of art by an American artist. It is considered by many to be the most important American painting not on American soil.

Better known as Whistler’s Mother, the painting has been owned by the French state since 1891 and is in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, presents the painting as the centerpiece of an exhibition on view at the Lunder Center at Stone Hill through September 27th.

Jay Clark, The Clark’s Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs takes us on a tour of the exhibition.

  Yesterday marked the 125th anniversary of the death of artist Vincent van Gogh.

For van Gogh, nature was the defining subject of his art. Over the course of his short but intense working life, Van Gogh studied and depicted nature in all its forms and there is a fantastic and extensive exhibition of this work at The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown Massachusetts through September 13th.

The exhibition is curated by Richard Kendall - our guide on this audio tour.

© 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  The first US exhibition to concentrate on artist Andy Warhol’s book work, Warhol by the Book opened at the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) March 7 and will be on view through August 16.

  During and just after World Wars I and II in Britain - in an era known as the Machine Age, the tumultuous political climate and the prevalence of industry and mechanization influenced the art created at that time.

Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection is a new exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA. The exhibition features a wide range of lithographs, dry points, woodcut prints and linocuts produced during the period exploring themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity.

  The Mount in Lenox, MA welcomes 40,000 visitors during its season from May 3-October 31. It is a destination point for lovers of Edith Wharton’s writing, historical mansion, exquisite gardens, and now lovers of contemporary sculpture.

Common Ground is an exhibition of contemporary outdoor sculptures currently on display at The Mount and presented in partnership with SculptureNow. In this segment we take a tour of the exhibition with SculptureNow Director, Ann Jon. We also check in with Susan Wissler, the Executive Director of The Mount.


  Painter Darren Waterston's installation Filthy Lucre is the centerpiece of Uncertain Beauty, his new exhibition at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA (on view through January 2015). It is a contemporary re-imagining of James McNeill Whistler's 1876 decorative masterpiece Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room.

A soundscape featuring voice and cello composed by the New York-based trio BETTY can be heard intermittently through the space, punctuating the silence with hauntingly beautiful reverberations.

Gregory Cherin

    Izhar Patkin: The Wandering Veil is a survey of works by the Israeli-born, New York-based artist Izhar Patkin. The show is currently on display at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA - filling their largest gallery space with works from Patkin’s 30-year career.

    The exhibition, Winslow Homer: Making Art Making History is currently on display at The Clark Art Museum in Williamstown, MA through September 8th. It features more than 200 works by Homer - spanning his career and including paintings, watercolors, drawings, etchings, lithographs, chromolithographs,wood engravings, photographs, correspondence, and books.

Homer began his career as an illustrator for the popular press, providing pictures of current events for newspapers in Boston and New York. Historians use these, as well as his paintings and watercolors, to illustrate mid-nineteenth-century 

  political and economic developments. Art historians, too, use the works to explore not only Homer’s life and endeavors, but also to consider broader questions such as the rise of the critical press, the quest for a national style, and the ramifications of the expanding nineteenth-century art market.

Michael Cassin - the Director for The Clark’s Center for Education in the Visual Arts - takes us on an audio tour of the exhibition.

Over the last several decades, archaeological discoveries across northern China have brought to light unexpected works of historical significance and extraordinary beauty.

The exhibition Unearthed: Recent Archaeological Discoveries from Northern China will be on view at The Clark in Williamstown, MA through October 21.