author

  After completing her MFA program in non-fiction, Hannah Tennant-Moore set off on a two-month sojourn to Sri Lanka to examine her longtime interest in Buddhism before beginning the next chapter of her professional career.

Immersed in the culture of the country and surrounded by the fascinating people that she got to know, she began to connect the threads that would form her new novel, Wreck and Order.  The result is a novel of ideas that looks at spirituality, sex, life, friendship, and the eternal quest for fulfillment in life and love that drives us all. 

  Joshua Cohen’s new novel, Book of Numbers, is narrated by a fictional Joshua Cohen – also a writer, whose misfortune is to have written a book with the publication date of September 11, 2001. 

  From renowned social critic, energy expert, and bestselling author James Howard Kunstler,The Harrows of Spring is a moving and gripping novel that completes the story of the quaint upstate New York town of Union Grove, thrown into a future world that in many ways resembles the nineteenth century.

In Union Grove, early spring is a challenging season, known as the “six weeks want,” a time when fresh food is scarce and the winter stores are dwindling. The town is struggling in particular this year as the Hudson River trade route to Albany has been halted by the local plantation tycoon Stephen Bullock, who has deemed it too resource-intensive and is now striving for self-sufficiency.

Judy Blume

Jul 6, 2016
Judy Blume
Sigrid Estrada

  In her new novel, Judy Blume, the New York Times #1 best-selling author of Summer Sisters and of young adult classics such as Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, creates a richly textured and moving story of three generations of families, friends and strangers, whose lives are profoundly changed by unexpected events.

She joins us to talk about the new novel, her magnificent career, and how much she likes working in her bookstore.

  He is one of the most prolific writers ever with 156 published books that have sold more than 325 million copies worldwide.

James Patterson is on a mission to get even more people to read in this digital age. He is introducing BookShots-- a new line of short and propulsive.

  Colm Tóibín is one of Ireland’s foremost living novelists and journalists. His most recent novel is Nora Webster, which the Los Angeles Times said “may actually be a perfect work of fiction.”

He also wrote the novel, Brooklyn, which was made into a successful film nominated this year for an Oscar for Best Picture. 

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

  Annie Proulx is the author of ten books, including the novel, The Shipping News and the short story, Brokeback Mountain.

Her new novel, Barkskins, imagines the forging of a new world through humanity’s insatiable appetite for timber and through two families intertwined in the early onslaught of modern global deforestation.

   In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're talking with Lawrie Balfour, professor of political science at the University of Virginia, and Michael Washburn, director of the programs at the New York Council for the Humanities, about the writer James Baldwin. Baldwin's work is a powerful lens through which to view the country's current moment of social and racial tension. Balfour and Washburn have created a new Baldwin-related theme for the Council's Reading and Discussion program, and today we'll be talking about Baldwin's value to our contemporary world as well as the new program.

  The Maurice Sendak Fellowship is a residency program that supports artists who tell stories with illustration. The Fellowship offers a four-week retreat for artists to live and work at Scotch Hill Farm in Cambridge, New York.

Battenkill Books is Cambridge will be presenting an exciting panel discussion with the 2016 Sendak Fellows: Elisha Cooper, Jenni Desmond, and Yuyi Morales that Joe Donahue will moderate.

This year’s fellows are Elisha Cooper, Jenni Desmond, and Yuyi Morales.

  Mark Twain, the highest-paid writer in America in 1894, was also one of the nation’s worst investors.

The publishing company Twain owned was failing; his investment in a typesetting device was bleeding red ink. After losing hundreds of thousands of dollars back when a beer cost a nickel, he found himself neck-deep in debt. His heiress wife, Livy, took the setback hard - but Twain vowed to Livy he would pay back every penny. And so, just when the fifty-nine-year-old, bushy-browed icon imagined that he would be settling into literary lionhood, telling jokes at gilded dinners, he forced himself to mount the “platform” again, embarking on a round-the-world stand-up comedy tour. No author had ever done that. He cherry-picked his best stories—such as stealing his first watermelon and buying a bucking bronco—and spun them into a ninety-minute performance. Twain trekked across the American West and onward by ship to the faraway lands of Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, India, Ceylon, and South Africa.

Richard Zacks' new book is Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain's Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour

  Mark Zwonitzer is an author and award-winning documentary filmmaker. 

His new book The Statesman and the Storyteller, is a dual biography covering the last ten years of the lives of friends and contemporaries, writer Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain) and statesman John Hay (who served as secretary of state under presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt), The Statesman and the Storyteller not only provides an intimate look into the daily lives of these men but also creates an elucidating portrait of the United States on the verge of emerging as a world power.

The Fireman By Joe Hill

May 17, 2016

From the award-winning, New York Times bestselling author of NOS4A2, Horns and Heart-Shaped Box comes a chilling novel about a worldwide pandemic of spontaneous combustion that threatens to reduce civilization to ashes and a band of improbable heroes who battle to save it, led by one powerful and enigmatic man known as the Fireman.

Joe Hill’s new novel is The Fireman. No one knows exactly when it began or where it originated. A terrifying new plague is spreading like wildfire across the country, striking cities one by one: Boston, Detroit, Seattle. It is known as Dragonscale, a highly contagious, deadly spore that marks its hosts with beautiful black and gold marks across their bodies—before causing them to burst into flames.

  In The Violet Hour, Katie Roiphe takes an unexpected and liberating approach to the most unavoidable of subjects.

She investigates the last days of six great thinkers, writers, and artists as they come to terms with the reality of approaching death, or what T. S. Eliot called “the evening hour that strives Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea.”

  Steve Berry is the author of fifteen historical novels. His latest, The 14th Colony, deals with presidential succession, potential disaster at the inauguration, and a real plan, never carried out, to invade Canada and make it The 14th Colony.

Berry’s protagonist, Cotton Malone, must stop disaster before it happens, which is only a few hours away. 

  Richard Russo is one of America’s most celebrated fiction writers, as well as an acclaimed screenwriter and memoirist. He is one of my favorite guests and favorite writers. The New York Times Book Review has called Russo, “one of the best novelists around.”

He is the author of eight novels, including Mohawk, That Old Cape Magic, and Empire Falls, for which he received the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His new novel, Everybody’s Fool, is a sequel to his novel Nobody’s Fool, which was made into a 1994 film starring Paul Newman.

In Everybody’s Fool, Russo revisits the upstate New York setting and characters of the highly-praised Nobody’s Fool. He will be speaking at The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA on Thursday at 7 p.m. and at the New York State Writer’s Institute on Friday Night at 8 p.m. at Page Hall.

  Local author/storytellers Courtney Maum and Hallie Goodman will lead a performance-based workshop where live reading is used as a revision tool.

Reading work out loud is a stupendous way to identify the trouble spots in a piece of writing. With the creative input of other participants, the workshop will help fiction and non-fiction writers understand where the work shines and where it can be tightened.

The workshop is presented by the Berkshire Festival of Women Writers and will take place this Saturday, May 7th at the Sandisfield Arts Center in Sandisfield, MA.

  After two acclaimed story collections, Laura Van Den Berg presents Find Me, her debut novel - a gripping, darkly funny tale of a young woman struggling to find her place in the world.

Her first collection of stories, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us, was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection and a finalist for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award. Her second collection of stories, The Isle of Youth, received the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Presented by the NYS Writers Institute - Laura will read from Find Me tomorrow at 8:00 p.m. at the Huxley Theatre at the NYS Museum in Albany. At 4:15 p.m., she will hold an informal seminar in the Standish Room in the Science Library on the UAlbany uptown campus.

  Gone with the Mind is Mark Leyner’s latest novel – in which a character named Mark Leyner is to give a reading from his autobiography, also entitled Gone with the Mind, in a mall food court. 

  Terry Tempest Williams, author and environmentalist, will speak at Williams College on Wednesday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m.

A naturalist and advocate for freedom of speech, Williams explores how environmental issues are social issues and ultimately matters of justice. Her next book, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, will be published in spring 2016 to honor the centennial of the National Park Service. Tempest is the author of 15 other books including Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place; An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field; Finding Beauty in a Broken World; and When Women Were Birds. She is a columnist for The Progressive and has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Orion Magazine, among others.

  Joe Gannon is a writer and spoken word artist. He was a freelance journalist in Nicaragua during the Sandinista Revolution, writing for The Christian Science Monitor, The Toronto Globe and Mail, and The San Francisco Examiner

He spent three years in the army, graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and did his MFA at Pine Manor College. After a stint teaching high school in Abu Dhabi, he wrote his first novel, Night of the Jaguar. He new novel is The Last Dawn

  Beloved children's book author Kate DiCamillo will be in our region next Friday, as she presents her new novel Raymie Nightingale in a Northshire Bookstore event on Friday, April 15, 6 pm at Saratoga City Center.

Kate DiCamillo – a Two-time Newbery Medalist - returns to her roots with the story of an unforgettable summer friendship. Raymie Clarke has come to realize that everything, absolutely everything, depends on her. And she has a plan. If Raymie can win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire competition, then her father, who left town two days ago with a dental hygienist, will see Raymie's picture in the paper and (maybe) come home.

  Helen Klein Ross is a multi-talented writer. Her poetry, essays and fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and numerous literary journals and anthologies. Her first novel was Making It: A Novel of Madison Avenue and her new novel is, What Was Mine and has already been chosen by People magazine as a Best New Book of 2016.

What Was Mine tells the story of Lucy Wakefield—a seemingly ordinary woman who does something extraordinary in a desperate moment: she takes a baby girl from a shopping cart and raises her as her own. It’s a secret she manages to keep for over two decades.

When Lucy’s now-grown daughter Mia discovers the devastating truth of her origins, she is overwhelmed by confusion and anger and determines not to speak again to the mother who raised her. What follows is a ripple effect that alters the lives of many and challenges our understanding of the very meaning of motherhood.

Helen Ross Klein will be on the Saturday Fiction Panel at the Woodstock Writer’s Festival.

  In his new novel The Doubter’s Almanac, Ethan Canin – the author of America, America and The Palace Thief explores the nature of genius,  rivalry, ambition, and love among multiple generations of a gifted family.

  Debbie Macomber has been dubbed "the reigning queen of women's fiction."

She has 200 million books in print; the newest, A Girl’s Guide to Moving On, is about a mother and her daughter-in-law who both leave their respective troubled marriages and lean on each other while starting over.

  Off the Grid, the sixteenth Joe Pickett novel by New York Times-bestselling author, C.J. Box, is told with pulse-pounding urgency and insight, a timely look at how terror is found—and fought—in the wild expanses of Wyoming, one of the most untouched parts of the United States. It is a thriller that also poses big questions and provokes controversial answers.

Off the Grid continues the success that C.J. Box launched in 2001 with Open Season, the very first Joe Pickett novel. Over that time, he’s taken on environmental terrorists, rogue federal land managers, animal mutilators, crazed cowboy hitmen, corrupt bureaucrats, homicidal animal rights advocates, and violent dysfunctional families.

  Carol Goodman is the critically acclaimed author of The Book of Dead Languages and The Seduction of Water.

Her latest, River Road, is a psychological thriller about a college professor accused of killing her favorite student in a hit-and-run accident and the secrets that emerge as she desperately tries to clear her name. 

    

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

  From Shirley Jackson, the peerless author of "The Lottery" and "We Have Always Lived in the Castle," comes a new volume of unpublished and uncollected stories, essays, lectures, letters and drawings.

Let Me Tell You brings together the deliciously eerie short stories Jackson is best known for with frank and inspiring lectures on writing; comic essays she wrote about her large, rowdy family; and revelatory personal letters and drawings.

The collection is edited by Jackson's children, Laurence Jackson Hyman and Sarah Hyman DeWitt. Laurence joins us for this interview.

  Best known for The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald was born in 1896, in St. Paul, Minnesota. The success of his first novel made him famous and let him marry the woman he loved, but he later descended into drinking and his wife had a mental breakdown.

Following the unsuccessful Tender is the Night, Fitzgerald moved to Hollywood and became a scriptwriter. He died of a heart attack in 1940, at age 44, his final novel only half completed. Today marks the 75th anniversary of his death.

In her book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

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