authoritarianism

Amy Siskind is a national spokesperson, writer and expert on helping women and girls advance and succeed. A former Wall Street executive, she's President and Co-founder of The New Agenda, a national organization working on issues including economic independence and advancement, gender representation and bias, and campus sexual assault. She is a frequent source for the national press, including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times.

In the immediate aftermath of Donald Trump's election as president, Siskind began compiling a list of actions taken by the Trump regime that pose a threat to our democratic norms. Under the headline: “Experts in authoritarianism advise to keep a list of things subtly changing around you, so you'll remember” Siskind's “Weekly List” began as a project she shared with friends, but it soon went viral and now has more than half a million viewers every week. Compiled in one volume for the first time, "The List" is a first draft history and a comprehensive accounting of Donald Trump's first year.

For most of Barack Obama’s first term as president he talked passionately, if not persuasively, about the need for national unity. Even the Stimulus Bill – largely a laundry list of pent up Congressional desires – was described as a national effort to get the economy moving. His prime legislative initiative, Obamacare, was advertised as a way to extend medical coverage for those without insurance. Of course, it nationalized one-seventh of the American economy and set the stage for unprecedented government expansion. Although it may be premature to attach historical labels to the president’s first term, I think his record displays what might be called “soft authoritarianism.”