bald eagle

  In the late 1970s, the bald eagle and the peregrine falcon were heading toward extinction, victims of the combined threats of DDT, habitat loss, and lax regulation. Flight Paths tells the story of how a small group of New York biologists raced against nature’s clock to bring these two beloved birds back from the brink in record-setting numbers.

McGrath documents both rescue projects in never-before-published detail. At Cornell University, a team of scientists worked to crack the problem of how to breed peregrine falcons in captivity and then restore them to the wild. Meanwhile, two young, untested biologists tackled the overwhelming assignment of rebuilding the bald eagle population from the state’s last nesting pair, one of whom (the female) was sterile.

Darryl McGrath is a journalist who has written about upstate New York’s environment and rural regions for over twenty years.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Officials from the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game have released their results of the first statewide bald eagle nesting survey, conducted earlier this spring.

The Department of Fish and Game has announced that 30 active bald eagle nets have been verified in Massachusetts, from the Berkshires to Cape Cod. The eagles were spotted as part of the state’s first bald eagle nesting survey, which was coordinated by the department’s Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and involved agency staff and volunteers.