Baseball Hall of Fame

As a player, Charles Dillon "Casey" Stengel's contemporaries included Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, and Christy Mathewson . . . and he was the only person in history to wear the uniforms of all four New York teams: the Dodgers, Giants, Yankees, and Mets.

As a legendary manager, he formed indelible, complicated relationships with Yogi Berra, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Billy Martin. For more than five glorious decades, Stengel was the undisputed, quirky, hilarious, and beloved face of baseball--and along the way he revolutionized the role of manager while winning a spectacular ten pennants and seven World Series Championships.  

But for a man who spent so much of his life in the limelight--an astounding fifty-five years in professional baseball--Stengel remains an enigma. Acclaimed New York Yankees' historian and bestselling author Marty Appel digs into Casey Stengel's quirks and foibles, unearthing a tremendous trove of baseball stories, perspective, and history. His new biography is: Casey Stengel: Baseball’s Greatest Character.

Keith Strudler: PEDs And The Baseball Hall Of Fame

Jan 7, 2015

I’m not a Hall of Fame guy. This isn’t just for baseball, but really for any sport. I’ve been to Canton, Ohio, and drove right past the Football Hall of Fame. I’ve been through Springfield and never thought about basketball. I don’t even know where hockey’s building is, much less the long list of secondary and college sports that maintain their own cathedrals.

Milo Stewart, Jr./National Baseball Hall of Fame Library

Home movie footage shot during a tour of Japan by American baseball stars 80 years ago has been digitized by the Hall of Fame.

Officials at the baseball shrine in Cooperstown say future Hall of Famer Jimmie Foxx and his wife, Helen, shot the film during a 12-city, 22-game tour in November and December 1934. Among the other future Hall of Famers on the tour were Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Connie Mack, and Moe Berg, a big-league catcher who served as an American spy during World War II.

Keith Allison/Flickr

Derek Jeter still has three games left in his career before retiring, but officials in Cooperstown are already thinking about his likely induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

The New York Yankees shortstop will be eligible for enshrinement in 2020. For Cooperstown Mayor Jeff Katz, it's not too early to start planning for the huge crowd that will show up for Jeter's induction.

Katz told WSTM-TV in Syracuse that the attendance that July weekend could top 100,000. When Tony Gwynn and Cal Ripken Jr. were inducted in 2007, about 80,000 jammed Cooperstown.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown is launching a traveling exhibit with museum artifacts and a major digital component.

Baseball Hall of Fame

Baseball Hall of Famer and longtime Mets broadcaster Ralph Kiner has died at age 91.

1/9/14 Panel

Jan 9, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus, Ira Fusfeld.

Topics include:
Christie Bridge Controversy
State of the State - NY
Gates on Biden
Baseball Hall of Fame
Zero Tolerance in Schools

Greg Maddux Won't Be Unanimous Hall Selection

Jan 8, 2014

 

Greg Maddux won't be a unanimous selection for the Hall of Fame.

Ken Gurnick of MLB.com, a former reporter for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, says the only player he voted for was Jack Morris. The pitcher is on the Baseball Writers' Association of America ballot for the 15th and final time after falling 42 votes shy last year.

Gurnick said Tuesday that he excluded "everybody from the Steroid Era."

In the wake of Lance Armstrong’s mea culpa that he took performance enhancing drugs – and the recent Baseball Hall of Fame vote (where NOBODY got in) – we ask you: Does it matter to you if athletes use performance enhancing drugs?

  For the first time in decades Hall of Fame voters decided not to confer baseball’s highest honor to anyone. What makes this announcement unusual is that the most celebrated names from an era marked by performance-enhancing drugs did not gain entry into baseball’s promised land. To make matters even more peculiar, this was a period in baseball history when testing for drugs didn’t exist.