Baseball

8/15/14 Panel

Aug 15, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are NYPIRG legislative director Blair Horner and College of St. Rose Communications Professor, Mary Alice Molgard.

Topics include:
Iraq Update
Robin Williams - Parkinsons
Obama Urges Calm
Military-like Response in Ferguson
Baseball Commissioner Battle

The National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown is launching a traveling exhibit with museum artifacts and a major digital component.

  Scott McCaughey, Steve Wynn and Linda Pitmon from The Baseball Project join us live at The Linda on their way to a gig at Club Helsinki tonight.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

With summer in full swing, baseball fans across the country are flocking to the ballpark. In Pittsfield, Massachusetts, a city that claims to have made the first written reference to the game in 1791 — when it banned the sport from being played within 80 yards of a meeting house — the destination is Wahconah Park. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief Jim Levulis spent a night at the storied ballpark now home to the

wikipedia

The Village of Cooperstown and National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum are preparing for the arrival of President Barack Obama tomorrow. The president is scheduled to speak about the tourism economy, just before the start of Memorial Day Weekend.

Jeff Katz, mayor of Cooperstown, says the village is eagerly awaiting the arrival of President Barack Obama on Thursday.

“It’s very exciting. All the residents, all the businesses I’ve spoke to are pinching themselves asking if it’s really true,” said Katz.

As we near another season, the sport’s all-time hits leader remains banned from baseball and its Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. It’s a stark problem in America’s pastime: some of its greatest players, including its home run champion Barry Bonds and other bashers from the steroid era, have an uneasy relationship with the sport and a worse one with fans, media and the record book.

    One Sunday afternoon in August 1965, on a day when baseball’s most storied rivals, the Giants and Dodgers, vied for the pennant, the national pastime reflected the tensions in society and nearly sullied two men forever.

Juan Marichal, a Dominican anxious about his family’s safety during the civil war back home, and John Roseboro, a black man living in South Central L.A. shaken by the Watts riots a week earlier, attacked one another in a moment immortalized by an iconic photo: Marichal’s bat poised to strike Roseboro’s head.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

A city with a ballpark steeped in history is being reenergized by its hometown team and its lineup of youthful leaders.

Baseball Hall of Fame

Baseball Hall of Famer and longtime Mets broadcaster Ralph Kiner has died at age 91.

    Bronx Bombers is a new play from the team behind Broadway's Lombardi that follows beloved icon Yogi Berra and his wife Carmen through a century of the team's trials and triumphs, bringing generations of Yankee greats together on one stage.

The show - written and directed by Eric Simonson - begins previews at Circle In The Square Theatre in New York City next week with Peter Scolari in the role of Yogi Berra and his real-life wife, Tracy Shayne, as Yogi’s wife, Carmen, with other accomplished actors portraying Reggie Jackson, Lou Gehrig, Derek Jeter, and other iconic Pinstripers.

Bronx Bombers is an original project conceived and commissioned by Fran Kirmser and Tony Ponturo. Together they bring new, original plays to the stage combining the drama of sports and entertainment through Kirmser Ponturo Group. Lombardi and Magic/Bird were the first two productions in the series - Bronx Bombers is the third.

Ed Lucas

Dec 18, 2013

    For the last several weeks, we have had a terrific team of interns helping with the task of putting this and other WAMC programs on the air. Throughout the semester, you have heard from our other interns - Patrick Garrett and Josh Natoli. This morning you will hear from Blaise Bryant.

Blaise is a senior at the College of St. Rose in Albany and is a Communications major. He is also blind. With a lifelong interest in sports and sports broadcasting, Blaise speaks this morning with one of his heroes, Ed Lucas.

For nearly 55 years, journalist Ed Lucas has proven there are no true handicaps in life. Despite his dreams of making baseball's big leagues, Lucas lost his sight at the age of 12 after being hit in the face with a line-drive. While unable to play the game, he has been a presence in the New York sports scene for more than half a century as a reporter covering the Yankees and Mets.

11/21/13 Panel

Nov 21, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Executive Editor of the Poughkeepsie Journal, Stu Shinske, and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Afghan Pact
Nuclear Option?
Kennedy Conspiracy Poll
Congressman Cocaine
A-Rod

    Much of the history of New York's scenic Mohawk Valley has been recounted time and again. But so many other stories have remained buried, almost lost from memory. Enter Bob Cudmore and his new book - Hidden History of the Mohawk Valley: The Baseball Oracle, the Mohawk Encampment and More.

The man called the baseball oracle correctly predicted the outcome of twenty-one major-league games. Mrs. Bennett, a friend of Governor Thomas Dewey, owned the Tower restaurant and lived in the unique Cranesville building. An Amsterdam sailor cheated death onboard a stricken submarine.

Not only people but once-loved places are also all but forgotten, like the twentieth-century Mohawk Indian encampment and the Camp in the Adirondacks, where Kirk Douglas was a counselor. Local historian Bob Cudmore delves deep into the region's history to find its most fascinating pieces of hidden history.

We don’t often think of professional athletes getting better with age but Jamie Moyer was a better pitcher in his 40s than he was in his 20s. Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball Game in April 2012.

Moyer pitched for eight teams, but his best years were with the Seattle Mariners, where he became and All-Star, and with the Philadelphia Phillies where he was a starter in a World Series run.

He chronicles his journey in the book, Just Tell Me I Can’t: How Jamie Moyer Defied The Radar Gun And Defeated Time. The book is co-written by Larry Platt.

Colby Perry/Flickr

The World Series is upon us! The Boston Red Sox are set to face the St. Louis Cardinals in this year’s championship. Game One is tonight at Fenway Park in Boston. 

    From profanity-laced clubhouse tirades and outspoken opinions on the state of the game to tears at an emotional funeral for his murdered granddaughter, Dallas Green tells his story for the first time in this autobiography. In his nearly 60 years in baseball as a pitcher; manager of three franchises, including both New York squads, the Mets and Yankees; general manager; and executive, Dallas Green has never minced words or shied away from making enemies.

This larger-than-life baseball personality shares insights from the mound, the dugout, and the front office as well as anecdotes of some of the game’s biggest stars and encounters with the press, player agents, and the unions.

8/1/13 - Panel

Aug 1, 2013

  For the first half of today's panel, Alan Chartock, Ray Graf, and Joe Donahue are joined by James Ketterer - Director of International Academic Initiatives & Senior Fellow at Bard College and just returned from 2-years in Egypt to discuss Egypt.

For the second half of the show, Fay Vincent, former Commissioner of Commissioner of Major League Baseball talks about the current and on-going steroid scandals in the sport.

T Charles Erickson

    The Red Sox musical Johnny Baseball is now running on the Nikos Stage at the Williamstown Theatre Festival.

Johnny Baseball brings to life the "Curse of the Bambino" through the stories of three orphaned souls -- hard-luck 1919 Red Sox right-hander Johnny O'Brien; his idol, Babe Ruth, and Daisy Wyatt, a dazzling African-American blues singer. Their intertwining fates reveal the source of the curse and the secret to its triumphant end in 2004, while also examining social and racial undertones that have impacted the team throughout its history.

Willie Reale wrote the lyrics and conceived the story of Johnny Baseball with playwright Richard Dresser.

Keith Strudler: Baseball's PED Problem

Jul 24, 2013

Last night I sat through a full nine innings of Single-A minor league baseball. Once the sugar high of Cracker Jacks and funnel cake wears off, it can get pretty old, if you plan on actually watching the game. There’s missed balls, botched plays, and everything else that reminds you why they call it the minor league instead of, say, the majors. But on a positive note, three hours and four pretzels later, I can definitively say that not everyone in professional baseball takes drugs. That’s probably news after this week, when major league baseball suspended Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun for the rest of the year without pay for his involvement with the Miami clinic Biogenesis, who apparently gave him enough supply to fill a Duane Reade. And I’m talking about one of the big ones down in the city, where they sell groceries and lawn furniture.

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we spotlight the Pennsylvania Humanities Council and specifically, The Souls of Black Baseball.

Bob Allen, a former Philosophy Instructor at Penn State has spent the last ten years traveling in the United States, visiting and interviewing every surviving player of the Negro Leagues in an effort to preserve the history and stories of Negro League Baseball.

He is currently working on an oral history project titled, The Souls of Black Baseball.

Making it through 50 of anything is quite an accomplishment. Going to 50 baseball games in a lifetime, for people not in the industry, is a feat likely held by a slight percentage of fans. Going to 50 opening days for a single team is an accomplishment shared by a chosen few, the fan elite.

Major League Baseball kicked off the 2013 season this week with near perfect pitching, big hits, and big wins.

The LA Dodger’s Clayton Kershaw pitched a complete shut out in his first outing of the season, not to mention his walk off home run to win the game. The powerhouse New York Yankees, depicted on the cover of the New Yorker as geriatric patients, lost to the rival Boston Red Sox. But, the New York Mets won their opening salvo with a commanding 11 to 2 runs scored over the San Diego Padres.

4/2/13 - Panel

Apr 2, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC’s News Director Ian Pickus, and Times-Union Capital reporter, Jimmy Vielkind.

This morning our discussion topics include:
Malcolm Smith's arrest
NYS Budget Wrap-up
Pork in the Budget
Obamacare Delays
North Korea Monitoring
Baseball’s Opening Day

Herbert London: Starting Over

Mar 20, 2013

The baseball gods regard spring training as a time of renewal. There aren’t any losses. All teams have the same record and players abound in hope for the future. Young pitchers are promising and Las Vegas odds are meaningless. Baseball heaven has angels dancing over the outfield.

    Baseball in the 1930s was more than a national pastime; it was a cultural touchstone that galvanized communities and gave a struggling country its heroes despite the woes of the Depression. Hank Greenberg, one of the most exciting sluggers in baseball history, gave the people of Detroit a reason to be proud.

But America was facing more than economic hardship. With the Nazis gaining power across Europe, political and social tensions were approaching a boiling point. As one of the few Jewish athletes competing nationally, Greenberg became not only an iconic ball player, but also an important and sometimes controversial symbol of Jewish identity and the American immigrant experience.

In the wake of Lance Armstrong’s mea culpa that he took performance enhancing drugs – and the recent Baseball Hall of Fame vote (where NOBODY got in) – we ask you: Does it matter to you if athletes use performance enhancing drugs?

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Major League Baseball has enacted new anti-doping policies that are being described as unprecedented in American professional sports. Yesterday, Major League Baseball and its Players Union said that starting next year they will be fighting the use of human growth hormone and testosterone - two allegedly popular banned substances.

NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman has been covering this story. Tom, good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

Major League Baseball will expand its effort to fight performance enhancing drugs to include random blood tests for human growth hormone and other substances during the regular season, under the terms of an agreement with the players union that was first reported by

The exhibit Pride & Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience opens tomorrow at the Poughkeepsie Public Library.

This nationally touring exhibition, which chronicles the remarkable history of baseball’s Negro leagues and the challenges and successes of African-American baseball players, opens today in Library’s Rotunda area.

An accompanying program series features lectures that relate the history of pre-integration baseball and the days leading to Jackie Robinson’s efforts to break the color barrier in America’s national pastime.

WAMC's Ian Pickus speaks with Daniel Levitt, author of The Battle That Forged Modern Baseball: The Federal League Challenge and its Legacy.

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