the beatles

As The Who gears up for the last leg of what the band swears will be its last tour — a claim first made in the 1980s — they’ve been opening shows with their first proper single, “I Can’t Explain,” written more than five decades ago when rock was still seen as a passing fad.

  Allen Klein was like no one the music industry had seen before. The hard-nosed business manager became infamous for allegedly catalyzing the Beatles’ breakup and robbing the Rolling Stones, but the truth is both more complex and more fascinating. As the manager of the Stones and then the Beatles—not to mention Sam Cooke, Donovan, the Kinks, and numerous other performers—he taught young soon-to-be legends how to be businessmen as well as rock stars. In so doing, Klein made millions for his clients and changed music forever.

Through unique, unprecedented access to Klein’s archives, veteran music journalist Fred Goodman tells the full story of how the Beatles broke up, how the Stones achieved the greatest commercial success in rock history, and how the music business became what it is today.

Michael Weintraub

  

  For those of us who never got to see The Beatles in concert, we're fortunate to have The Fab Faux dedicate themselves to faithfully recreating some of the most extraordinary music ever written – and they’ll return to The Egg in Albany, NY this Saturday, March 28th at 7:30pm – performing 'Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band' in its entirety with the Hogshead Horns and the Crème Tangerine Strings.

The musical virtuosity of The Fab Faux – in actuality five of the hardest working musicians in NYC – turns the concept of a Beatles tribute band on its head. Far beyond being extended sets of cover versions, their astounding shows are an inspired re-discovery of the Beatles’ musical magic, as The Fab Faux tackles the group’s most demanding material live onstage in a way that has to be experienced to be believed.

Will Lee joins us now. Will has played music with all 4 Beatles and is the bassist for Paul Shaffer’s CBS Orchestra on The Late Show With David Letterman.

Sir Paul In Albany

Jul 2, 2014

    A musician, musicologist, professor, and chair of Skidmore’s Music Department, Gordon Thompson has been studying British popular music in general and The Beatles in particular for almost 20 years.

His book Please Please Me: Sixties British Pop, Inside Out, brought a fresh take on a well-known subject through interviews with artist-and-repertoire managers, music directors, recording engineers, songwriters, and session musicians active in London in that decade.

He joins us to talk about what it means to have Paul McCartney playing The Times Union Center in Albany, NY this coming weekend.

    Sir Paul McCartney is performing at The Times Union Center in Albany, NY this weekend.

As the 1970s began, the Beatles ended, leaving Paul McCartney to face the new decade with only his wife Linda by his side. Holed up at his farmhouse in Scotland, he sank into a deep depression. To outsiders, McCartney seemed like a man adrift—intimidated by his own fame, paralyzed by the choices that lay before him, cut loose from his musical moorings.

But what appeared to be the sad finale of a glorious career was just the start of a remarkable second act.

We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

    

  As part of its ongoing NY Living Legacy Project, The Egg Performing Arts Center will explore the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ arrival in New York with a number of performances and related events from February 6 through 15. The celebration will include a series of multi-media events in eight area community centers and be highlighted by two performances at The Egg. One of the featured concerts at The Egg will be The Fab Faux, they'll perform on February 15.

Bassist, Will Lee, is one of the founders of The Fab Faux - he's probably best known his work on The Late Show with David Letterman as part of the CBS Orchestra.

    The arrival of the Beatles was one of those unforgettable cultural touchstones. Through the voices of those who witnessed it or were swept up in it indirectly, The Beatles Are Here! explores the emotional impact—some might call it hysteria—of the Fab Four’s February 1964 dramatic landing on our shores.

This intimate and entertaining collection arose from writer Penelope Rowlands’s own Beatlemaniac phase: she was one of the screaming girls captured in an iconic photograph that has since been published around the world—and is displayed on the cover of this book.

   Feb. 7, 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the first visit by the Beatles to the USA.

A musician, musicologist, professor, and chair of Skidmore’s Music Department, Gordon Thompson has been studying British popular music in general and The Beatles in particular for almost 20 years.

Scott Freiman

The White Album is nearly 45 years old, but interest in one of the Beatles’ most important artistic achievements, and in the group itself, remains rampant. One person who has paid special attention to what might have been the Beatles’ greatest year, 1968, is Scott Freiman, a composer, sound designer and musician in his own right who lectures on the Beatles and their work.

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