biography

    The film, Unbroken, directed by Angelina Jolie opened last week. It is based on the best-selling book by Laura Hillenbrand. We spoke with her about the book and its subject, World War II hero, Louis Zamperini, when the book came out in 2010.

    

    In Timeless, a literary memoir, Lucinda Franks, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, tells the intimate story of her marriage to Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, one of the great men of our time.

   Historian and biographer Richard Norton Smith is in our region talking about his new book, On His Own Terms: A Life of Nelson Rockefeller. Fourteen years in the writing, the book is being hailed as the definitive biography of the New York governor and U.S. vice president.

Historian Douglas Brinkley described the book as, “one of the greatest cradle-to-grave biographies written in the past fifty years.”

The New York State Writers Institute presents a conversation with Richard Norton Smith at 4:15 this afternoon in the Standish Room in the Science Library at SUNY Albany, and Smith will be speaking tonight at 7:30 about his biography at Page Hall on SUNY Albany’s Downtown Campus at 8PM.

  Author of the bestseller This Town, Mark Leibovich returns with a collection of portraits of Washington’s elite, and wannabe elites in his new book, Citizens of the Green Room.

Hailed by The Washington Post as a “master of the political profile,” Leibovich has spent his career writing memorable and buzz-worthy features about politicians and other notables.

Currently chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Leibovich punctures the inflated personas of the powerful, and in, he reveals the lives, stories, and peculiarities behind the public masks.

  Miss Peggy Lee cast a spell when she sang. She hypnotized, even on television. Lee epitomized cool, but her trademark song, “Fever” is the essence of sizzling sexual heat.

Her jazz sense dazzled Ray Charles, Duke Ellington, and Louis Armstrong. She was the voice of swing, the voice of blues, and she provided four of the voices for Walt Disney’s Lady and the Tramp, whose score she co-wrote.

With interviews with hundreds who knew Lee, acclaimed music journalist James Gavin offers a revealing look at an artist of infinite contradictions and layers. 

  The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered by Laura Auricchio is major biography of the Marquis de Lafayette, French hero of the American Revolution, who, at age nineteen, volunteered to fight under George Washington.

    Margaret Fuller was a groundbreaking author, social reformer, and Transcendentalist. In her new biography about Fuller, Pulitzer finalist, Megan Marshall, tells the story of how Fuller, tired of Boston, accepted Horace Greeley’s offer to be the New-York Tribune’s front-page columnist. The move unleashed a crusading concern for the urban poor and the plight of prostitutes, and a late-in-life hunger for passionate experience.

The book is entitled, Margaret Fuller: A New American Life.

TV comedic actor Phil Hartman is best known for his eight brilliant seasons on Saturday Night Live, where his versatility and comedic timing resulted in some of the funniest and most famous sketches in the television show’s history.

When author Jeff Hobbs arrived at Yale University, he became fast friends with the man who would be his college roommate for four years, Robert Peace. Robert’s life was rough from the beginning in the crime-ridden streets of Newark in the 1980s, with his father in jail and his mother earning less than $15,000 a year.

"Updike" By Adam Begley

Aug 20, 2014

    

  In this magisterial biography, Adam Begley offers an illuminating portrait of John Updike, the acclaimed novelist, poet, short-story writer, and critic who saw himself as a literary spy in small-town and suburban America, who dedicated himself to the task of transcribing “middleness with all its grits, bumps and anonymities.”

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