In the new book Brigham Young: A Concise Biography of the Mormon Moses, author Ed Breslin examines Young’s life using a scholarly focus with a sense of measured admiration, but he doesn’t gloss over the darker aspects such as Young’s role in the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Breslin left his job as publisher and senior vice president of HarperCollins to be a full-time writer after more than two decades in publishing, and has co-written biographies of William Tecumseh Sherman and George S. Patton. In 2008, he collaborated on Sen. Mel Martinez’s memoir, A Sense of Belonging.

    After his mysterious death, Dag Hammarskjöld was described by John F. Kennedy as the "greatest statesman of our century." The second secretary-general of the United Nations, he is the only person to have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize posthumously.

Through extensive research in little explored archives and personal correspondence, Roger Lipsey has written a massive biography of Dag Hammarskjöld. Hammarskjöld: A Life provides vivid new insights into Hammarskjöld’s life.

Roger Lipsey is an author, art historian, editor, and translator and has written on a wide range of topics and intellectual figures.


  Simón Bolivar freed six countries from Spanish rule, traveled more than 75,000 miles on horseback to do so, and became the greatest figure in Latin American history. His life is epic, heroic, straight out of Hollywood: he fought battle after battle in punishing terrain, forged uncertain coalitions of competing forces and races, lost his beautiful wife soon after they married and never remarried (although he did have a succession of mistresses, including one who held up the revolution and another who saved his life), and he died relatively young, uncertain whether his achievements would endure.

Drawing on a wealth of primary documents, novelist and journalist Marie Arana brilliantly captures early nineteenth-century South America and the explosive tensions that helped revolutionize Bolívar.

    Novelist Ellen Meister is a serious Dorothy Parker fan. So much so, she created a Facebook page dedicated to the literary icon and celebrated wit. When it came to writing about her, since Meister is a novelist not a biographer, she decided to write in Dorothy Parker's voice - as a ghost. We’ll talk with Ellen Meister about her book Farewell, Dorothy Parker.

"Hopper" by Tom Folsom

Apr 8, 2013


  Dennis Hopper was the chopper-riding hippie outlaw in Easy Rider, the prophetic madman in the jungle in Apocalypse Now, the terrifying psychopath in Blue Velvet and the kid gone wrong in Rebel Without a Cause.

The actor was taken under the wing of James Dean, a friendship that set Dennis Hopper on his path to becoming a star. He was a quintessentially American dreamer longing to be the next Orson Welles, a hell-raising director who revolutionized Hollywood.

    In modern memory, Winston Churchill remains the man with the cigar and the equanimity among the ruins. Few can remember that at the age of 40, he was considered washed up, his best days behind him.

    Barry Siegel joins us to talk about his new book: Manifest Injustice: The True Story of a Convicted Murderer and the Lawyers Who Fought for His Freedom.

In the book, Siegel chronicles the dramatic story of an Arizona man named Bill Macumber who, until his unexpected release from prison last November, had spent more than half his life behind bars.

  Walter Stahr, author of an acclaimed biography on one of Union College's most distinguished alumni, William Henry Seward, will deliver the keynote address at Founders Day today at 12:45 in Memorial Chapel. The event commemorates the 218th anniversary of the College’s charter.

Eslanda "Essie" Cardozo Goode Robeson lived a colorful and amazing life. Her career and commitments took her many places: colonial Africa in 1936, the front lines of the Spanish Civil War, the founding meeting of the United Nations, Nazi-occupied Berlin, Stalin's Russia, and China two months after Mao's revolution. She was a woman of unusual accomplishment—an anthropologist, a prolific journalist, a tireless advocate of women's rights, an outspoken anti-colonial and antiracist activist, and an internationally sought-after speaker.

      Before he was a stadium-packing megastar, Bruce Springsteen was an introvert, desperate to strike a balance between his nuanced songwriting and the heft of his backing band. Clinton Heylin’s revelatory biography, E Street Shuffle: The Glory Days of Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, chronicles the evolution and influence of Springsteen’s E Street Band as they rose from blue-collar New Jersey to the heights of rock stardom.