biomass

NYS Energy Plan

Renewable energy is taking center stage in New York, as the state forges ahead in its quest to develop and expand solar, wind and hydropower.

The end is near for the last coal-fired power plant in western Massachusetts.

Mount Tom Station in Holyoke, which had generated electricity only sporadically in recent years, is to shut down for good this month.  Alicia Barton, CEO of the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center said her agency is funding a $100,000 study to look at possible reuses for the plant site.

" This is really going to be a community-led  process. What we hope to do is bring a set of additional expertise and information to that conversation."

WAMC

The city council in Springfield is pressing ahead with a court fight against a proposed wood-burning power plant.  But first the council had to secure the services of a lawyer who would take the case for free.

Activists who have been working for months on a climate change plan for Springfield, Massachusetts say they must factor in an unwanted development — the possible construction of a wood-burning power plant in the city.

Neighborhood representatives, community organizers, and people from health-focused organizations have been brainstorming ways to improve the environment and reduce greenhouse gases with a goal to present a plan to the Springfield City Council by the end of the year.

A recent decision by the United States Court of Appeals ruled that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not have the authority to put a "biogenic carbon deferral" into place in 2011 that would postpone regulating the carbon emissions from biogenic sources for three years.

The temporary deferral was set to expire in 2014, when EPA is due to release a decision on the future regulations of biomass energy after the results of a 3-year study on carbon emissions associated with bioenergy sources.

The town council of Greenfield, Massachusetts has voted to approve a 14-month moratorium on industrial biomass power generators and all waste-to-energy projects until September, 2014.

It’s believed that the 14 month moratorium on industrial size biomass burning and all waste to energy projects in Greenfield is the first of its kind in Massachusetts.   Eleven members of the 12-member town council approved the moratorium, with one member abstaining.

The vote came after a petition was submitted to the town council with a large amount of support from town residents.