the book show

Salman Rushdie’s is best known for his novels Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses, among others.

While those take place in India and the United Kingdom, his latest, The Golden House, is set in New York City against the backdrop of modern politics from Obama to Trump. 

WAMC/Northeast Public Radio is excited to announce a new season of guests and a re-brand of its popular syndicated program The Book Show. The change includes a new logo and new theme music.

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers.

Dr. Atul Gawande helped transform the conversation about aging and death in his book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End.

He is a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, a professor at Harvard Medical School, and a staff writer at The New Yorker.

Caroline Leavitt’s new novel, Cruel Beautiful World is about coming of age in 1969; about wild love, rebellion, and finding oneself in the time of Woodstock and the Manson murders.

The novel is a haunting, nuanced portrait of love, sisters, and the impossible legacy of family.   

Rachel Kadish’s new novel The Weight of Ink is set in London. It is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect – one an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi, just before the plague hits the city; the other an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history.

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s new book, The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, is inspired by her time at a law firm in Louisiana working on the retrial defense of death-row convicted murderer and child molester Ricky Langley. She shows how ''the law is more personal than we would like to believe and the truth more complicated, and powerful, than we could ever imagine.''

Tom Perrotta’s new novel, Mrs. Fletcher, is a provocative and very funny look at parenthood, the empty nest, and sex in the suburbs.

Perrotta is the author of eight works of fiction including Election, Joe College and Little Children. His novel The Leftovers was adapted into an HBO series that just finished up a three-season run. 

Robert Thurman is a recognized worldwide authority on Indo-Tibetan Buddhism, and His Holiness the Dalai Lama. His new book - Man of Peace - presents the inside story of the Dalai Lama delving into his amazing life and vision, in the high tension of the military occupation of Tibet and the ongoing genocide of its people.

Alexandra Fuller is best known for her memoirs about her African childhood and the family she left behind; she’s just written her debut novel, Quiet Until the Thaw.

The book brings us into the world of the Lakota Sioux in South Dakota and the fictional family she has imagined there. 

Arundhati Roy published her first novel, The God of Small Things, back in 1997 and now Roy is back with a new novel, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.

In it, she weaves among other threads, the story of a transgender woman in Delhi and a Kashmiri freedom fighter while also shining a spotlight on modern India.

In her new novel, Touch, author Courtney Maum tells the story of a leading trend forecaster who suddenly finds herself in the position of wanting to overturn her own predictions.

Maum examines the issues of technology, family, and artificial intelligence in a sophisticated and very entertaining way. 

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels, his latest is House of Names. The book is his reimagining of one of the most famous Greek tragedies – the stories of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra, Iphigeneia, Electra, and Orestes.

  Best-selling historian Nathaniel Philbrick once again takes readers deep into the American Revolution, leading them into battles and illuminating the players on the field and behind the scenes.

His latest - Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution - is a complex, controversial, and dramatic portrait of a people in crisis and the war that gave birth to a nation. 

Author Jim Shepard is the author of seven novels and four short story collections. He now has brought his amazing talents as a fiction writer with an intimate approach to real historical subjects to ten new short stories in his latest, The World to Come.

The new book includes powerful tales of courageous responsibility and criminal indifference set in the past and present.

John Grisham has sold more than 300 million copies of his books and has had 29 consecutive No. 1 books on the New York Times fiction bestsellers list.

His latest novel, Camino Island, is about a heist of the original manuscripts of F. Scott Fitzgerald's novels and the efforts to retrieve them.

Senator Al Franken has represented the State of Minnesota in the US Senate since 2009. Before entering politics, he was one of the original writers and performers on Saturday Night Live.

He is also a best-selling author. His new book is Al Franken, Giant of the Senate where he tells the story of an award-winning comedian who decided to run for office and discovered why award-winning comedians tend not to do that. 

As a columnist for the Miami Herald and a prolific novelist of books such as Strip Tease, Lucky You and Star Island, Carl Hiaasen always has his eye on his home state of Florida.

His latest, Razor Girl, keeps the tradition alive with a funny and offbeat mystery set in Key West. A crash scam is only the beginning of events that spiral crazily out of control.

Min Jin Lee’s historical novel, Pachinko, spans the entire 20th century through four generations, three wars and two countries with a troubled past.

The novel is a moving and powerful account of one of the world’s most persecuted immigrant communities—Koreans living in Japan. 

Jonathan Lethem is the New York Times bestselling author of ten novels, including Dissident Gardens, The Fortress of Solitude, and Motherless Brooklyn; as well as several short story and essay collections.

He has a pair of new books - More Alive and Less Lonely is his collection of writing on writing.  He is also the co-editor of Shake It Up which spotlights landmark music writing.

In thriller writer Lisa Scottoline’s latest novel, One Perfect Lie, we meet Chris Brennan, although that’s not really his name. He’s the new teacher and assistant baseball coach at Central Valley High. Among his secrets: Six days from now, there’s going to be a bombing. But what does Chris want from the baseball players and families?  

Anita Shreve is the New York Times best-selling author of The Weight of Water and The Pilot's Wife. Her latest,

The Stars are Fire, brings 1947 – the year Maine burned – to life, in a story about an extraordinary young woman tested by a catastrophic event and its aftermath.

Have you ever thought to yourself, “did that really happen, or did I just imagine that to be true?” In Dan Chaon’s new novel, Ill Will, he explores two sensational unsolved crimes – one in the past, another in the present -both linked by one man’s memory and self-deception.

Calvin Trillin has been a regular contributor to The New Yorker since 1963. His many books include novels, celebrated memoirs, such as About Alice and Remembering Denny; his classics on eating; and, of course, his humor writing. His latest is an update of his classic collection, Killings.

Bestselling author Anne Lamott’s work looks to help guide us through the confusion of the world, the complexities of our own hearts, and the complications of understanding relationships with others – children, partners, friends, neighbors, the stranger at the clothing store.

Her latest is: Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy. 

Harlan Coben’s latest Myron Bolitar mystery, Home, centers around a kidnapping of two young boys from wealthy New Jersey families a decade earlier. The kidnappers demanded ransom then never contacted the families again. When one of the boys, now a teenager, is found in London not only is everyone stunned, they learn life-changing details of the fate of his friend as well.

  Louis Begley, best known for his masterful observations of life in New York City’s upper crust, made his thriller debut with Killer Come Hither.

That book told the story of former Marine Corps officer turned novelist and Yale Alum, Jack Dana. Now Begley continues Jack’s story in the sequel, Kill and Be Killed.

In Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and bestselling author Helene Cooper tells the harrowing and triumphant story of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, leader of the Liberian women’s movement, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, and the first democratically elected female president in African history.

At the end of Mark Twain’s masterwork, Huckleberry Finn declares that he plans to “light out for the Territory” to avoid getting “sivilized.”

For 130-plus years, readers have been left guessing about the adventures in the West. But now, Huck is back, thanks to prize-winning novelist Robert Coover. His novel is Huck Out West.

George Saunders is considered one of the great masters of the short-story. He’s now written his first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo – a novel that comes from the real-life death of Willie Lincoln, the 11 year-old son of Abe and Mary Lincoln in 1862. 

This year marks the 30th Anniversary of one of crime fiction’s greatest characters, John Rebus, created by one of the world’s leading crime writers, Ian Rankin.

Rebus’s anniversary coincides with the release of Rather Be the Devil, Rankin’s 21st Rebus novel. Ian Rankin joins us to talk about one of Crime Fiction's great curmudgeons.

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