the book show

Felix Clay / http://www.theguardian.com/

  British mystery and crime writer, Ruth Rendell, one of the most prolific authors in the genre with more than 60 novels, died at the age of 85 on May 2nd following a stroke in January.

We remember her, and her popular protagonist Chief Inspector Wexford, on this week’s Book Show.

  Frankie Bailey is a Professor of Criminal Justice, she’s also the author of mysteries as well as non-fiction titles that explore the intersections of crime, history, and popular culture.

In her new novel, What the Fly Saw, she looks at the real world of police work and criminal law and speculates on how they might change in the near future.

    Often called the dean of writers about the American West, Ivan Doig is the author of such national bestsellers as The Whistling Season and The Bartender's Tale.

In his latest novel, Sweet Thunder, he reprises his beloved character, Morrie Morgan, to take on the power of the press in an era of intense corporate greed and social unrest.

  Dennis Lehane is the author of twelve novels including the best-selling Mystic River, Gone, Baby, Gone, and Shutter Island. His latest is World Gone By where Lehane continues the epic story of Joe Coughlin who made his debut in The Given Day and continued in Live by Night.

  In a remarkable 50 year literary career, Joyce Carol Oates has given readers incisive explorations of violence, race, class, sex, and gender in America.

Her new novel, The Sacrifice, examines the confluence of political, social, and moral complexities that fuel a community’s reaction to an alleged crime against a young black girl.

    Chilean writer, Isabel Allende, has written her first murder-mystery.

Ripper takes place in San Francisco and centers on Amanda, a teen sleuth hooked on crime novels and online games. When a rash of killings strikes the city and her mother disappears, she takes it upon herself to investigate.

    More than 20 years after his debut as a fiction writer, Booker Prize winning author, Roddy Doyle, returns to the man who started it all: Jimmy Rabbit.

His new novel, The Guts, is a follow up to his first novel, The Commitments – which opened this past October as a musical on London’s West End. 

  In novelist Stewart O' Nan’s latest novel, West of Sunset, he imagines F. Scott Fitzgerald's final years, which he spent in Hollywood. He is living in an apartment, in poor health, struggling with alcoholism, and is increasingly despondent over his declining literary reputation.

  Gail Godwin takes a look at the publishing industry over the last fifty years, a time of great upheaval and ingenuity, in her new memoir, Publishing.

Godwin is a three-time National Book Award finalist and is the bestselling author of fourteen novels including Flora, Evensong, and The Good Husband.

  Novelist Lauren Oliver has made her mark in Young Adult literature with such book as Before I Fall, Panic and the Delirium Trilogy. Oliver is making her first foray into Adult fiction with Rooms, a tale of two ghosts trapped in the walls of an old house and the family whose home and lives overlap with their own.

Pages