brain

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue May 13, 2014

"The Tale Of The Dueling Neurosurgeons" By Sam Kean

    Early studies of the human brain used a simple method: wait for misfortune to strike -- strokes, seizures, infectious diseases, horrendous accidents -- and see how victims coped. In many cases their survival was miraculous, if puzzling. Observers were amazed by the transformations that took place when different parts of the brain were destroyed, altering victims' personalities. Parents suddenly couldn't recognize their own children. Pillars of the community became pathological liars. Some people couldn't speak but could still sing.

In The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, Sam Kean travels through time with stories of neurological curiosities: phantom limbs, Siamese twin brains, viruses that eat patients' memories, blind people who see through their tongues.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 23, 2014

"Smarter: The New Science Of Building Brain Power" By Dan Hurley

    Expanding upon one of the most-read New York Times Magazine features of 2012, Smarter penetrates the hot new field of intelligence research to reveal what researchers call a revolution in human intellectual abilities.

Shattering decades of dogma, scientists began publishing studies in 2008 showing that “fluid intelligence”—the ability to learn, solve novel problems, and get to the heart of things—can be increased through training.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon August 19, 2013

"Brain Wars"

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed January 23, 2013

"The Day My Brain Exploded: A True Story" by Ashok Rajamani

    After a full-throttle brain bleed at the age of twenty-five, Ashok Rajamani, a first-generation Indian American, had to relearn everything: how to eat, how to walk and to speak, even things as basic as his sexual orientation.

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