Brian Shields

Today is the first day on the job for the new president and CEO of The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region. John Eberle comes to the area from a similar position in central New York. Eberle says The Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region is a philanthropic organization, founded in 1968, that targets the region's most pressing problems with financial donations.

If you want to get ahead in life, you have to learn to make good decisions. And that should start at an early age. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about a program in upstate New York called the Leadership project that is working to help 5th graders make good choices.

We’ll also hear about a new bachelor’s degree in homeland security, find out what a warm line is (hint: it’s kinda like a hot line…only less urgent), and we’ll spend an academic minute learning from our mistakes.

Elizabeth Warren at DNC
WAMC

On the third night of the Democratic National Convention when President Obama and Vice President Biden are expected to speak, our capital correspondent Karen DeWitt has the latest from Philadelphia. 

Has Bernie Sanders created a movement that he no longer controls? At the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, some Sanders supporters have heeded the Vermont senator's call to support the party nominee, Hillary Clinton, but others remain committed to Sanders. Dr. Luke Perry is chair of the department and associate professor of government and politics at Utica College and has been covering the convention for WKTV in Utica.

Among the delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia is Dolores Huerta, a member of the California delegation and a board member of People For The American Way. In 1962 she co-founded The National Farm Workers Association with Cesar Chavez, which later became The National Farm Workers Union. She is also president of The Dolores Huerta Foundation for grassroots organizing. Dolores Huerta says the economy is among the most important issues facing the nation this election year.

The President and CEO of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and Albany writer and activist Barbara Smith are the featured guests at an event today in Albany in support of the Upper Hudson chapter of Planned Parenthood. The women's leadership circle luncheon at the Albany Hilton is part of a fundraising effort by Upper Hudson Planned Parenthood and its President Chelly Hegan, who joined Cecile Richards on the phone in advance of the event. Richards commented on the importance of a recent U.S Supreme Court ruling against Texas laws regulation.

Professor Adrian Masters
albany.edu

Following the decision by voters in the United Kingdom last week to leave the European Union, the word uncertainty has been used to describe the economic and social fallout. Stock markets around the world, including on Wall Street, have fallen since the vote. Professor Adrian Masters, the chair of the department of economics at the University at Albany, spoke with WAMC News about why so much uncertainty has followed the Brexit. 

Soldier's heart was the name given to the post war stress and trauma suffered by soldiers in the civil war. It has been called PTSD, battle fatigue and shell shock, but Soldier's Heart is also the name of an organization based in the capital district that helps veterans to recover from the emotional and mental scars of the battlefield. Tuesday on Midday Magazine we heard from Harry Scott a vet who was helped by soldiers Heart and now works for the organization. We also heard from co-founders Dr. Edward Tick and his wife Kate Dahlstedt. Today, Dr. Tick tells us more about the programs offered by Soldier's Heart, in the second part of the interview. 

For centuries men have returned from war with battle scars and medals, but also with emotional scars that are not always evident. This has been called battle fatigue, shell shock or post-traumatic stress disorder and for those back from the civil war it was known as soldier's heart. Soldier's Heart is also the name of an organization founded 10 years ago by psycho-therapist Dr. Edward Tick and his wife Kate Dahlstedt to help military veterans with P-T-S-D and the emotional scars of war. Harry Scott is a vet who came to Soldier's Heart for help and now works for the organization in Business Development and Fundraising. 

Trying to reach children before they make the wrong decisions that could lead to a life of crime is the goal of "The Leadership Project," a voluntary program aimed at fifth graders in schools across Albany, Schenectady and Troy. 80 people from federal, state and local agencies go to the schools to encourage good decision making. The leadership project is the initiative of the U.S Attorney for the Northern District of New York, Richard Hartunian.

Haley Viccaro
Daily Gazette

The Schenectady City Council will meet behind closed doors in executive session late this afternoon, and the talk is expected to center on allegations made against the mayor, Gary McCarthy. 38-year-old Sarah Dingley of the town of Rotterdam says the mayor was intoxicated in the early morning of May 19, following her vehicle and flashing his headlights. The mayor has denied any wrongdoing and police haven't filed any charges. Haley Viccaro is a reporter for the Daily Gazette and says the council meeting at 5:30 will be closely watched.

Times Union reporter Robert Gavin
Times Union reporter Robert Gavin

It is very unusual for a person to be tried four times for murder, but that is exactly what happened to Cal Harris, a wealthy Tioga County, New York resident who was found not guilty on Tuesday in a non-jury trial in Schoharie County, bringing an end to the criminal portion of a 15-year legal saga. Harris was charged with killing his wife on the night of Sept. 11, 2001. Her body has never been found. Robert Gavin, who covered the case for the Times Union, says the case of Cal Harris was long and legally complex.

Over the past 25 years, the exclusive and often elite atmosphere of private schools in New England has been shaken by lawsuits and allegations of sexual abuse. The Boston Globe's Spotlight team, the investigative unit that inspired the Oscar-winning movie of the same name for its coverage of Catholic clergy sex abuse, looked into the scandals in the private schools and on Sunday published its story on the front page. Jonathan Saltzman, one of the reporters who dug into the story, says many of those who were abused came forward because of Penn State, the Catholic Church and other high-profile cases.

John Dankosky
John Dankosky

Today is primary day in Connecticut, and as with last Tuesday’s vote in New York, today’s vote in Connecticut will matter for the first time in years. By this point, primaries in both states haven’t mattered very much, with nominations often decided, but not this year as the fight is likely to go to the conventions. For more on today’s primary in Connecticut, we spoke with John Dankosky, the host of the program “Where We Live” on WNPR in Hartford.

There are three new members of New York’s Education Policy Panel, the State Board of Regents, but will it lead to any changes in the debate over education? The Executive Director of the New York State School Boards Association Tim Kremer believes it will. 

 

 

 Woodstock and Watkins Glen, both of which were in Upstate New York, were among the rock festivals that set the standard for the scores of festivals that would follow. At Hunter Mountain in Greene County Mountain Jam 12 is set for June 2-5. It began with just four acts in 2005, and is now a major and economic event for the region. Mountain Jam founder Gary Chetkof told us how the festival goes about booking the line-up. 

Republicans are standing firm, saying the next president should nominate the person to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court, not President Obama, who is in his final year in office.

The legal standoff between Apple and the FBI over access to the phone of one of the San Bernardino shooters is the latest debate over privacy versus security. Dr. Schuyler Foerster, the Brent Scowcroft Professor of National Security Studies at the Air Force Academy, will be speaking Monday evening at the Donald Katt Institute for Constitutional Studies at SUNY Ulster where he will address crime versus terrorism and other related topics including Apple versus the Justice Department. 

Robert J. Freeman, Executive Director New York State Committee on Open Government
NYS Forum

Just how transparent and open is New York state government and the hundreds of local and county governments across the state? That question will be at the center of the discussion tomorrow evening in Woodstock as the Executive Director of the New York State Committee on Open Government, Robert Freeman, speaks at the Mescal Hornbeck Community Center. The speech, which begins at 7, is free and open to the public. In advance of the speech, Freeman spoke to WAMC.

bicycle
Arturo Sotillo/Flickr

Getting drivers and bike riders to safely share the road is one of the main goals of the New York Bicycling Coalition, which works to move the bike movement forward in areas including bike safety, tourism, recreation, law enforcement and infra-structure. The coalition’s Executive Director, Paul Winkeller, says New York has a long way to go in promoting bicycling, as it came in 29th in a recent bike-friendly state ranking by the League of American Bicyclists.

Homecoming Tonight For "Nightmare Code" Director

Oct 1, 2015

A local filmmaker returns home tonight for a one-night screening of Nightmare Code, a psychological sci-fi thriller that looks at where technology could be taking us in the not too distant future. Mark Netter was raised in Delmar and attended Bethlehem Central High School before studying film and TV production at NYU. He is the director, co-writer and producer of Nightmare Code, which will be screened at the Spectrum in Albany.

The 21st annual Race for the Cure to benefit breast cancer research will take place Saturday in Albany at the Empire State Plaza. There is a 5-k coed run and a two-mile family walk. For more on the event and for an update on efforts to prevent and cure breast cancer, we spoke with Tori Roggen, executive director of the Northeastern New York Affiliate of Susan G. Komen For the Cure.

http://www2.epa.gov/

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new regulations covering the use of pesticides by employees at farms, nurseries, greenhouses and in forests. Officials say the new standards will protect the nation's 2 million farm workers and their families from exposure to pesticides each year, exposures that can lead to sick says, lost wages, and medical bills. EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck says the regulations that take effect in 12-24 months have been updated for the first time in more than two decades.

March Gallagher

A new president and CEO will take over soon at The Community Foundations of the Hudson Valley, a philanthropic organizations that works to benefit Dutchess, Ulster and Putnam counties by raising money for scholarships, grants, endowment funds and charitable organizations. The Board of Trustees recently named March Gallagher as CEO and president effective Sept. 28. She is now with Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress.

New York State Office of Victim Service

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo this week signed legislation extending victim benefits to the grandchildren of murder victims. The state will now reimburse grandchildren for the cost of counseling after a homicide. For more on the new law, WAMC spoke with Elizabeth Cronin, director of the New York State Office of Victim Services.

Watervliet Mayor Mike Manning
Watervliet Mayor Mike Manning

The city of Watervliet, just to the north of Albany, is a river town along the banks of the Hudson whose factories and mills have long since closed, a not unusual situation across the towns, villages and cities of upstate New York. As the city works toward a new economic future, two members of its 24-member police force were recently arrested, one in a drug investigation, the other on an underage sex charge. Watervliet Mayor Mike Manning says the arrests do not reflect on the city and its future.

RCHS

Keeping the past alive while moving into the future is a challenge, met every day by historical societies around the region. Karin Krasevac-Lenz is the newly appointed executive director of the Rensselaer County Historical Society; she takes over for Ilene Frank, who left for a new position in Hartford, Connecticut. Krasevac-Lenz says the society has a busy agenda, both short- and long-term.

The small Greene County town of Windham is welcoming visitors from around the world this week for an international sporting event being held at the Windham Mountain Resort. WAMC's Brian Shields speaks with Chip Seamans, the president and general manager of the resort, about the event that will draw visitors to the area all week.  

Organization Seeks "Common Ground" In Disputes

Jul 1, 2015

Being caught in the middle of an argument is never fun, but there are people who actually volunteer for such duty. In the 1980s, legislation was passed in New York establishing dispute resolution services for all 62 counties in the state. The aim is to keep people out of court and resolve all types of disagreements. One such service is located in Catskill. Dawn Wallant is the executive director of Common Ground Dispute Resolution.

As many urban schools face struggles, including high dropout rates and lagging test scores, the former chancellor of the New York City schools says gifted students from low-income backgrounds are not being supported in many of today's schools. Dr. Harold Levy now serves as the executive director of the Jack Kent Cooke foundation, which recently issued a report on the problem of low-income students not having the chance to take part in advanced learning opportunities.

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