bullying

Singer Dominic James Leads Anti-Bullying Tour

May 1, 2016

  One out of every four students is bullied. That's according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. One country singer is traveling the United States trying to change that - by not only telling his story about being bullied as a child, but singing it - to anyone who will listen.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

An anti-bullying presentation created in part by a local physical education teacher is gaining popularity across New York and the country. The program got a warm reception by middle school students in Fulton County this morning.

  When Emily-Anne Rigal was in elementary school, she was bullied for being overweight so severely that she had to transfer schools. But with this change came another unanticipated transformation: she went from being the bullied to the bully. The messages she had received (being fat = no good) compelled her to treat others poorly in an unconscious effort to make others feel bad about themselves too.

Inspired by her experiences, she founded the non-profit WeStopHate.org to help others share their experiences with bullying by posting videos to YouTube and help foster good “teen esteem.” In the process, her organization garnered nearly 1 million views and the support of Meryl Streep, Lady Gaga, Whitney Port, and Josie Loren, among others.

Her new book is: FLAWD: How to Stop Hating on Yourself, Others, and the Things That Make You Who You Are.

  In the new book: So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, Jon Ronson investigates the world of public shaming, where social media has made everyone a vigilante and where a poorly phrased tweet or comment can catapult a person to Public Enemy No. 1 overnight.

Shaming moves with lighting speed and has a terrifyingly powerful effect, sometimes destroying a person’s entire life. Ronson follows up with those whose lives have been left in tatters, and questions those being most cruel in the anonymous internet playground, resulting in a powerful and very humane dispatch from the front line of the escalating war on human nature and its flaws.

Jon Ronson’s books include the New York Times bestsellers The Psychopath Test, Them: Adventures with Extremists and The Men Who Stare at Goats.

Courtesy of the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence

There’s a new social media campaign in New York designed to educate teens, young adults, and others about teen dating violence. The campaign comes as Governor Andrew Cuomo has proclaimed February Teen Dating Violence Awareness/Prevention Month.

The social media campaign is a video by teens for teens.

Report Studied School Harassment Among LGBT Students

Nov 17, 2014

High school can be a tough time for many young people, but especially so for students who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. A new survey indicates those students can still face harassment, both verbal and physical, in the halls of the nation's high schools. Wayne Bowmanchester is a board member of the Capital Region chapter of GLSEN, the gay, lesbian, straight education network. He says student attitudes were recently surveyed as part of a national effort.

A number of activities to raise funds and awareness to combat bullying will take place this week in Springfield, Massachusetts, where the suicide five years ago of an 11-year- old student focused national attention on bullying in schools.

The Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover Foundation has scheduled a series of events that began Wednesday with a mayoral designation of the second weekend in September as “Anti-Bullying Weekend” in the city of Springfield. 

WAMC

A protest was held today outside a western Massachusetts high school to draw attention to alleged anti-Islamic bullying.

      About 50 people, most of them college students, stood in a steady rain on the sidewalk in front of West Springfield High School for about half-an-hour on Wednesday holding signs denouncing bullying and bigotry.  They were joined by three Muslim sisters who claim they’ve been harassed at school because of their religious beliefs.

  " I've been called terrorist, towel head in my class," said Najma Hussein.

 

classroom
en.wikipedia.org

Authorities are investigating a case of Video Bullying involving a suburban Albany school.

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