campaign contributions

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A New York state senator from the Hudson Valley has introduced legislation calling for increased penalties for people found violating election law. The bill is prompted by what he alleges were unlawful campaign contributions in the 2014 elections tied to New York City’s mayor. 

The mayor of Syracuse will voluntarily forego campaign contributions from limited liability companies and is urging state lawmakers to close a much-criticized campaign finance loophole.

A New York state Board of Elections investigator appointed by Governor Andrew Cuomo may have found a back door way into breaking some of the secrecy surrounding a major campaign contribution loophole in New York.

Following recent federal court decisions, New York's Board of Elections says the $150,000 limit on state campaign donations by an individual will no longer be enforced . That means an individual, or limited liability corporation, with deep pockets can contribute to as many statewide and state legislative candidates, political parties and advocacy groups as they wish, subject only to the recipients' restrictions.

New York's campaign finance system may be about to change, but not the way good-government groups and many Democrats in public office had hoped for. WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas reports.

Wednesday morning, in a 5-to-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down overall contribution limits to federal campaigns and committees. Observers say the ruling could have an immediate impact on the 2014 midterm elections, and the decision opens the door to a possible challenge to New York's campaign contribution limits.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s anti-corruption commission held another hearing Monday evening focusing on reforming the state’s campaign finance system.  A reform group is out with a report that they say raises questions about five million dollars spent on lobbying and donations by the pharmaceutical industry.