campaign finance

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Vermont Attorney General William Sorrell is rejecting a request that he appoint an independent counsel to investigate allegations that he has violated Vermont's campaign finance laws.

The Vermont Attorney General's office has filed a civil lawsuit claiming the publicly-financed candidate in last year’s race for lieutenant governor committed campaign finance violations. Now, the former candidate has filed a countersuit.

wikipedia commons

The Vermont Attorney General  has filed a civil lawsuit against the losing candidate in last fall’s Lieutenant Governor’s campaign.

Steve Johnson/Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court has turned aside a challenge to Vermont's campaign finance law, ending a five-year legal battle.

Steve Johnson/Flickr

Attorney General William Sorrell calls it a good day for Vermont. That's his reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court turning aside a challenge to Vermont's campaign finance law, letting a lower court's decision stand.

Photo by Pat Bradley

 An experimental public campaign finance system for the state Comptroller’s race has fizzled, after the lone candidate who applied for the program failed to meet the minimum threshold to obtain the public monies.

The pilot public campaign financing program was limited to just the state Comptroller’s race as part of a state budget deal.

It was widely condemned at the time by reform groups as fatally flawed. Blair Horner of the New York Public Interest Research Group called it “cynical.”

The test of public campaign financing in the New York comptroller race has proved ineffective, with the incumbent declining to participate and the challenger falling short of the thresholds that would parlay his $200,000 into $1.2 million.

Republican Robert Antonacci has raised more than $200,000 so far, meeting the minimum required to receive 6-to-1 state funding for his bid to become the state's chief financial officer.

But about $50,000 of that comes from donations greater than $175, too large to be counted.

America’s campaign finance system has been awful for many years.  But thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court, that bad situation has gotten worse.  In its landmark decision Citizen United, the Court ruled that corporations have the same free speech rights as flesh and blood human beings.  As such, corporations can spend as much as they want on elections, as long as such spending is not coordinated with a candidate.

Steve Johnson/Flickr

Candidates, political action committees and parties in Vermont were required to file updated campaign finance reports Tuesday. Incumbent Governor Peter Shumlin’s account is far ahead of his key challenger, while the lieutenant governor’s race is competitive.
Steve Johnson/Flickr

Republican candidate for governor, Scott Milne of Pomfret has logged contributions of more than $20,000 for his campaign this reporting period.

Pages