cancer

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Caring Together is an organization dedicated to providing support, education, and advocacy for women with ovarian cancer and to supporting research efforts aimed at finding an early detection test and a cure. They are best known for their monthly support group and yearly ovarian cancer run in Albany's Washington Park.

Joining us this morning is Kelly Quist-Demars, survivor and administrative assistant to the board. 

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In their new book, Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki Jackson and David Ryan have crafted a step-by-step guide aimed at helping people grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. 

The book is designed to be a resource full of patient stories, teaching patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care - beginning at the moment of diagnosis. They also explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer.

Sophie Sabbage was forty-eight years old, happily married, and mother to a four-year-old daughter when she was diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer. Since that shocking diagnosis, she has been on a remarkable journey of healing and renewal that has reshaped her life—for the better. 

The Cancer Whisperer chronicles Sophie’s extraordinary relationship with cancer and the very effective methods she has used for dealing with her fear, anger, denial, and grief.

The governor has done a lot to promote the state’s program to boost breast cancer screening rates.  He spent considerable time advocating for the expanded program and made it a centerpiece of his 2016 State of the State address.  But cancer is not only a women’s issue, it affects all of us. 

Elizabeth Lesser, cofounder of Omega Institute and the Omega Women's Leadership Center, is author of The Seeker's Guide and Broken Open.

Her new memoir is Marrow, a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love.

Joining us this afternoon for Medical Monday to discuss radiation oncology is Dr. Camilo Torres of the Dyson Center for Cancer Care at Vassar Brothers Medical Center in Poughkeepsie, NY.  Alan Chartock hosts.

Dr. Orion Howard
Southwestern Vermont Medical Center

Joining us this afternoon for Medical Monday to discuss oncology and cancer are Doctors Orion Howard and Matthew Vernon of Southwestern Vermont Medical Center. 

Dr. David Shaffer of NY Oncology Hematology
New York Oncology Hematology

Host Alan Chartock discusses the latest advances in treatment and prevention of  genitourinary  cancers with Dr. David Shaffer of New York Oncology Hematology.  Listeners are invited to call with their questions for Dr. Shaffer.

Vice President Joe Biden at the University of Vermont
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vice President Joe Biden was on the University of Vermont campus this morning to discuss his work as chair of President Obama’s Cancer Moonshot Task Force, which has a goal to advance and accelerate cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Schumer
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

New York U.S. Senator Charles Schumer stopped by Troy's Central Fire Station on Monday to promote legislation that would create the first ever national firefighter cancer registry, along with three major grants for the Collar City's fire crews. 

  Kelly’s Angels is preparing for its popular Mother-Lovin’ Day 5K Run/Walk, this Sunday – Mother’s Day - at the Saratoga Spa State Park in Saratoga Springs, New York.

Kelly’s Angels was founded in 2008 by WNYT reporter Mark Mulholland in memory of his wife, Kelly, who passed away in 2007 after a battle with cancer. Kelly's Angels provides gifts to children under the age of 18 who have lost a parent or sibling to cancer. The donations, called "Fun Grants,” are as varied as the kids whom Kelly’s Angels serves — from the purchase of a guitar, a night out at a fancy restaurant, to trips to big league games.

Mulholland says the event is held on Mother’s Day because it honors Kelly as a devoted mother, wife and revered teacher who loved children with all of her heart.

With more than 1,500 participants and supporters last year, the Mother-Lovin’ Day 5K has quickly become a family tradition in the Capital Region.

New York Oncology Hematology is hosting the Spring to Life Conference on Hematologic Malignances on Saturday, April 16th at the Hilton Albany Hotel.

This one-day conference includes a morning and afternoon session for physicians, nurses and health care providers. The morning session focuses on advancements in treatment of hematologic malignancies.

In the afternoon, the conference is open to the public, and focuses on living with cancer and blood disorders. Patients, survivors, family and caregivers are encouraged to attend. Session topics include managing a progressive illness, talking with a family member about an advancing disease and a Q&A session with audience participation.

Dr. Ira Zackon is the Director of the NYOH Stem Cell Transplant Program and is conference chair and we welcome him to the show this morning.

Also joining us, Barbara Cantave - Multiple Myeloma Survivor and patient of Dr. Zackon at New York Oncology Hematology and Stem Cell Transplant Recipient, through NYOH.

Cancer plan cover
Vermont Department of Health

Advocates gathered at the Statehouse in Montpelier Thursday for the launch of the state’s latest five-year action plan to reduce cancer.

As someone who grew up in Northern California during the 1970s, I was surrounded by all the fads of the New Age movement: past-life regression, crystals, channeling, EST (or Erhard Seminars Training), macramé, hot tubs, and the nascent organic food movement.

  There are 13 million people with cancer in the United States, and it’s estimated that about 1.3 million of these cases are hereditary. Yet despite advanced training in cancer genetics and years of practicing medicine, Dr. Theo Ross was never certain whether the history of cancers in her family was simple bad luck or a sign that they were carriers of a cancer-causing genetic mutation. Then she was diagnosed with melanoma, and for someone with a dark complexion, melanoma made no sense. It turned out there was a genetic factor at work.

Using her own family’s story, the latest science of cancer genetics, and her experience as a practicing physician, Ross shows how to spot the patterns of inherited cancer, how to get tested for cancer-causing genes, and what to do if you have one. Theo Ross’s new book is: A Cancer in the Family. 

When Breath Becomes Air

Jan 13, 2016

  At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated.

When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality.

We speak with Paul's wife, Lucy, about his book and his experience.

  Bibi Blair is a fierce, funny, dauntless young woman—whose doctor says she has one year to live. She replies, “We’ll see.”

Her sudden recovery astonishes medical science. An enigmatic woman convinces Bibi that she escaped death so that she can save someone else. Someone named Ashley Bell. But save her from what, from whom? And who is Ashley Bell? Where is she?

Ashley Bell is a new milestone in literary suspense from the long-acclaimed master, Dean Koontz.

  Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings have just released a new record, It’s A Holiday Soul Party. Their previous album, Give the People What They Want was nominated for a Grammy Award. The new Christmas album features soul revivals of holiday classics and original songs like “There Ain’t No Chimneys in the Projects” and “8 Days (of Hanukkah).”

Sharon Jones and The Dap Kings are performing at The Egg in Albany, NY this Saturday, December 5th at 7:30pm -- bringing their inimitable energy and sound to the stage of The Hart Theatre. They are also guests on “Michael Bublé’s Christmas in Hollywood” which will air on NBC on December 10th. The Dap Kings blast and blare, side-step and put on a great show at the center of which is the incredible vigor of Sharon Jones - providing lead vocals and more power than seems possible.

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company

  Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996. Previously he worked at The Washington Post.

He is the author of three New York Times best-sellers: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers; a collection of his New Yorker articles titled What the Dog Saw and most recently, David and Goliath

This episode was recorded live at The White Hart Inn in Salisbury, CT and presented by Oblong Books and Music. 

  Adam Johnson is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his acclaimed novel about North Korea, The Orphan Master’s Son.

Johnson’s new book - Fortune Smiles – is a collection of stories that gives voice to the perspectives we don’t often hear, while offering a new way of looking at the world. The collection was just named a National Book Award finalist.

  The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is a volunteer-driven charity committed to funding the most promising research to find cures for childhood cancers and give survivors long, healthy lives. The St. Baldrick's Foundation is the world’s largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants, making more than $24.5 million in new grants last year.

This Saturday, May 2nd, from 10am-4pm, this year’s annual head-shaving event and fundraiser will take place at Proctors in Schenectady, NY.

We are joined now by Mike DeBritz, the founder and Volunteer Event Coordinator for the St.Baldrick's headshaving at Proctor's and Tina Lee, 4 year shavee, captain of team Cue Balls for a Cure, Committee volunteer, and co-emcee of the event. 

4/20/15 Panel

Apr 20, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Ship capsized off Libyan coast; FBI admits flaws in hair analysis; ISIS Video; New blood test in Cancer research; Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire.

About five percent of men and women in the United States will develop colon cancer during their lifetimes. 1 in 3 adults is not getting tested for the disease as recommended.  The American College of Gastroenterology is promoting screening as part of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in March.    WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief  Paul Tuthill spoke with Dr. Dennis Ahnen of the American College of Gastroenterology.

    More than 20 years after his debut as a fiction writer, Booker Prize winning author, Roddy Doyle, returns to the man who started it all: Jimmy Rabbit.

His new novel, The Guts, is a follow up to his first novel, The Commitments – which opened this past October as a musical on London’s West End. 

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Black Friday is just around the corner, but parents are being urged to take care when buying toys this year. Several being sold in Albany County contain toxic chemicals that pose health risks to children, according a new survey.  Researchers found a dozen toys on store shelves containing lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium and more – toxic chemicals that have been linked to cancers, cognitive impairments and hyperactivity.

Joining us this afternoon for Medical Monday is radiation oncologist Dr. Arsyl De Jesus of New York Oncology Hematology. She’s here to answer your questions about cancer treatment and radiation therapy.

Dr. Lawrence Garbo
New York Oncology Hematology

  In the studio today for Medical Monday is Dr. Lawrence Garbo and GerryAnn Currier of New York Oncology Hematology in Albany. They head up the organization’s clinical research trial operation, which has played a pivotal role in the FDA approval of a number of anti-cancer drugs.

An annual report from the advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society is out, grading each state on various cancer prevention and cancer fighting policies. The report card is mixed for New York.

New York Oncology- Hematology

The baseball world is mourning the death of Tony Gwynn. One of the all-time baseball greats died this week at the age of 54 from oral cancer. Gwynn, who spent his entire career with the San Diego Padres, like many of his fellow players, used smokeless tobacco. Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, who said he never smoked or used smokeless tobacco, recently announced that his oral cancer had returned and has undergone additional surgery. Despite efforts to discourage its use, some baseball players still use smokeless tobacco, a leading cause of oral cancers, according to Dr. Todd Doyle, Chief of Radiation Oncology at New York Oncology-Hematology.

surgeongeneral.gov

Those health warnings on the side of a package or carton of cigarettes are well-established and have become more severe and graphic over the years. That warning from the Surgeon General was the result of a landmark 1964 report by the Surgeon General, establishing a link between cigarettes and heart disease and cancer. Fifty years later, the acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak, says progress has been made, but smoking remains a serious health problem.

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