cancer

4/20/15 Panel

Apr 20, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant, Libby Post.

Scheduled topics include Ship capsized off Libyan coast; FBI admits flaws in hair analysis; ISIS Video; New blood test in Cancer research; Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire.

About five percent of men and women in the United States will develop colon cancer during their lifetimes. 1 in 3 adults is not getting tested for the disease as recommended.  The American College of Gastroenterology is promoting screening as part of National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month in March.    WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief  Paul Tuthill spoke with Dr. Dennis Ahnen of the American College of Gastroenterology.

    More than 20 years after his debut as a fiction writer, Booker Prize winning author, Roddy Doyle, returns to the man who started it all: Jimmy Rabbit.

His new novel, The Guts, is a follow up to his first novel, The Commitments – which opened this past October as a musical on London’s West End. 

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Black Friday is just around the corner, but parents are being urged to take care when buying toys this year. Several being sold in Albany County contain toxic chemicals that pose health risks to children, according a new survey.  Researchers found a dozen toys on store shelves containing lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium and more – toxic chemicals that have been linked to cancers, cognitive impairments and hyperactivity.

Joining us this afternoon for Medical Monday is radiation oncologist Dr. Arsyl De Jesus of New York Oncology Hematology. She’s here to answer your questions about cancer treatment and radiation therapy.

Dr. Lawrence Garbo
New York Oncology Hematology

  In the studio today for Medical Monday is Dr. Lawrence Garbo and GerryAnn Currier of New York Oncology Hematology in Albany. They head up the organization’s clinical research trial operation, which has played a pivotal role in the FDA approval of a number of anti-cancer drugs.

An annual report from the advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society is out, grading each state on various cancer prevention and cancer fighting policies. The report card is mixed for New York.

New York Oncology- Hematology

The baseball world is mourning the death of Tony Gwynn. One of the all-time baseball greats died this week at the age of 54 from oral cancer. Gwynn, who spent his entire career with the San Diego Padres, like many of his fellow players, used smokeless tobacco. Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, who said he never smoked or used smokeless tobacco, recently announced that his oral cancer had returned and has undergone additional surgery. Despite efforts to discourage its use, some baseball players still use smokeless tobacco, a leading cause of oral cancers, according to Dr. Todd Doyle, Chief of Radiation Oncology at New York Oncology-Hematology.

surgeongeneral.gov

Those health warnings on the side of a package or carton of cigarettes are well-established and have become more severe and graphic over the years. That warning from the Surgeon General was the result of a landmark 1964 report by the Surgeon General, establishing a link between cigarettes and heart disease and cancer. Fifty years later, the acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak, says progress has been made, but smoking remains a serious health problem.

    Playwright, author and activist Eve Ensler traces many paths of reconnection in her memoir, In the Body of the World.

It is the path of reconnection with her body, after she is diagnosed with cancer; with the people of the world, in the face of injustice and abuse; and with the earth.

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