cancer

Joining us this afternoon for Medical Monday is radiation oncologist Dr. Arsyl De Jesus of New York Oncology Hematology. She’s here to answer your questions about cancer treatment and radiation therapy.

Dr. Lawrence Garbo
New York Oncology Hematology

  In the studio today for Medical Monday is Dr. Lawrence Garbo and GerryAnn Currier of New York Oncology Hematology in Albany. They head up the organization’s clinical research trial operation, which has played a pivotal role in the FDA approval of a number of anti-cancer drugs.

An annual report from the advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society is out, grading each state on various cancer prevention and cancer fighting policies. The report card is mixed for New York.

New York Oncology- Hematology

The baseball world is mourning the death of Tony Gwynn. One of the all-time baseball greats died this week at the age of 54 from oral cancer. Gwynn, who spent his entire career with the San Diego Padres, like many of his fellow players, used smokeless tobacco. Former Buffalo Bills quarterback Jim Kelly, who said he never smoked or used smokeless tobacco, recently announced that his oral cancer had returned and has undergone additional surgery. Despite efforts to discourage its use, some baseball players still use smokeless tobacco, a leading cause of oral cancers, according to Dr. Todd Doyle, Chief of Radiation Oncology at New York Oncology-Hematology.

surgeongeneral.gov

Those health warnings on the side of a package or carton of cigarettes are well-established and have become more severe and graphic over the years. That warning from the Surgeon General was the result of a landmark 1964 report by the Surgeon General, establishing a link between cigarettes and heart disease and cancer. Fifty years later, the acting Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Boris Lushniak, says progress has been made, but smoking remains a serious health problem.

    Playwright, author and activist Eve Ensler traces many paths of reconnection in her memoir, In the Body of the World.

It is the path of reconnection with her body, after she is diagnosed with cancer; with the people of the world, in the face of injustice and abuse; and with the earth.

Sean Philpott: Rage Against The Dying Of The Light

Jan 16, 2014

Until last week, most people had never heard of Lisa Bonchek Adams. A devoted wife and mother to three young children, Ms. Adams has been battling end-stage cancer for the last seven years.  This 44-year-old Connecticut woman has chosen to fight her disease tooth and nail, including enrolling in a clinical trial at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital in New York City.

    David Menasche lived for his work as a high school English teacher. When a six-year battle with brain cancer ultimately stole David’s vision, memory, mobility, and—most tragically of all—his ability to continue teaching, he was devastated by the thought that he would no longer have the chance to impact his students’ lives each day.

More than 90 communities across the country take part in the Lung Cancer Alliance's Shine a Light on Lung Cancer Vigil throughout the month of November. A Vigil at Albany Medical Center - Hilton Garden Inn will take place Thursday night, November 14th at 5:30pm.

The Alliance is looking to advocate for public health dollars for research for cheap, widely available early detection like a blood or urine tests, and provide patient support services. And they look to triple lung cancer survivorship by 2020. Joining us to tell us more:

Dr. Hilton Hossanah is here, he is a Thoracic Surgeon and Assistant Professor at Albany Medical Center. We also welcome Betsy McPhail:  She built a network of support as a caregiver, which gave her the support she needed to get through. Her 20's something sister was diagnosed and died from lung cancer. And Phyllis Goldstein is Director of Lung Cancer Alliance New York and a never smoker survivor who found the path of advocacy to honor the death of her best friend and her father to lung cancer.

   There is a remarkable new anthology - holding on, letting go that collects stories by people who've learned to look death in the eye and to savor life's gifts.

Bestselling author Abigail Thomas leads the Memoir Group at Kingston's Oncology Support Program of the HealthAlliance of the Hudson Valley. In 2011, after her daughter was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, Thomas volunteered to lead a five-week writing workshop. Nearly two years later, it's still going strong.

Abigail Thomas joins us along with Barbara Sarah, a breast cancer survivor, and one of book’s 15 contributors who founded the Oncology Support Program. We are also joined by two other contributors: Carol Dwyer and Craig Mawhirt.

Pages