caregiver

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In their new book, Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki Jackson and David Ryan have crafted a step-by-step guide aimed at helping people grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. 

The book is designed to be a resource full of patient stories, teaching patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care - beginning at the moment of diagnosis. They also explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we’ll learn about Eddy Alzheimer’s Services’ Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Initiative. The goal of which is to help relieve the physical, emotional, and financial burden of caregivers in New York state that are caring for their loved ones with Alzheimer’s or Dementia.

Andrew Delollo is Grant Manager for Eddy Alzheimer’s Services and he joins us to tell us more. 

  Many know Kimberly Williams-Paisley as the bride in the popular Steve Martin remakes of the Father of the Bride movies, the calculating Peggy Kenter on Nashville, or the wife of country music artist, Brad Paisley. But behind the scenes, Kim was dealing with a tragic secret: her mother, Linda, was suffering from a rare form of dementia that slowly crippled her ability to talk, write and eventually recognize people in her own family.
  
Where the Light Gets In tells the full story of Linda’s illness—called primary progressive aphasia—from her early-onset diagnosis at the age of 62 through the present day.