cartoonist

Courtesy Norman Rockwell Museum

  Roz Chast has loved to draw cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn and began selling cartoons to The New Yorker as soon as she submitted them in 1978. Her cartoons have also been published in many other magazines, she has illustrated several books and won many awards for her work.

In her first memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, Chast brought her signature wit to the topic of aging parents.

The memoir and her other work is currently featured in an exhibition at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA.

Since the series’ launch, Big Nate has had more than 8 million books in print and 117 weeks on the New York Times best-seller list. Now with the seventh book, the series continues with Big Nate Lives It Up. In the latest installment of the series, Nate is asked to befriend a new student; he is all for it—until he actually meets the kid. Is Nate stuck with a fun-sponge, or does the new kid have a surprise in store which Nate never saw coming?

Lincoln Peirce is the author and cartoonist behind Big Nate and he joins us to discuss his new novel.

    Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker magazine and he has the best job in the world. At least, that’s what everyone tells him.

In his new memoir, How About Never – Is Never Good For You? My Life in Cartoons, Mankoff illustrates that in fact he has two amazing jobs. Editor and is also one of the magazine foremost cartoonists himself.

    Author, editor and publisher Victor S. Navasky will draw on his most recent book when he delivers the 26th annual Fox-Adler Lecture at Skidmore College. “The Art of Controversy: Political Cartoons and Their Enduring Power” is the title of Navasky’s talk, to be presented at 5:15 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, in Gannett Auditorium of Palamountain Hall. A reception and book signing will immediately follow in the Class of 1967 lobby adjacent to the auditorium.

Navasky’s talk has the same title as his newest book, which describes how transformative and incendiary cartoons can be. He said, “Cartoons and cartoonists are usually thought of as irrelevant, trivial, ‘not serious.’ However, that is not true.

  In her first memoir, New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast brings her signature wit to the topic of aging parents. Spanning the last several years of their lives and told through four-color cartoons, family photos, and documents, and a narrative as rife with laughs as it is with tears, Chast’s memoir is both comfort and comic relief for anyone experiencing the life-altering loss of elderly parents.

While the particulars are Chast-ian in their idiosyncrasies—the themes are universal: adult children accepting a parental role; aging and unstable parents leaving a family home for an institution; dealing with uncomfortable physical intimacies; managing logistics; and hiring strangers to provide the most personal care.

The book is a portrait of two lives at their end and an only child coping as best she can. The name of the book is Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?

    It is always a thrill to welcome New Yorker Cartoonist Liza Donnelly to the program. She has a new book of cartoons and writing, Women on Men that is available as an e-book.

The book is a collection of over 200 of her cartoons. The theme is primarily about women being funny.

Liza Donnelly has been publishing cartoons in the New Yorker since 1982. She is also a weekly columnist and cartoonist for Forbes.com, specializing in politics and women’s rights, and for three years, Donnelly has been drawing a weekly cartoon on gender issues and women’s rights for the news site, Women’s Enews.

www.tcj.com / The Comics Journal

  Gary Leib has won wide praise for his work as an animator and cartoonist, including a 1994 Harvey nomination for his Fantagraphics comic book, Idiotland. His illustrations and cartoons have appeared in The New Yorker, Musician Magazine, The New York Observer, Raw, Blab and as weekly features in The New York Press for many years. He is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and has taught in the graduate computer animation program at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan. His animation company is called, Twinkle.

Gary curates “Animation for Adults” for the FilmColumbia Festival and this year’s program will screen at 12:30 pm on Saturday.

Liza Donnelly

   The Rhinebeck and Red Hook arts communities are hosting the 10th annual Art Along the Hudson Spring Kick-off Media Event, on Wednesday May 15th.

The purpose of this AAH event is to bring together business owners, elected officials, artists, arts patrons and the media with a focus on the many and varied cultural opportunities available and how they generate economic growth.