casinos

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo
Office of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo

When state lawmakers approved a bill to permit new gambling casinos in the final hours of the legislative session, they left something out.   A provision to ban campaign contributions to legislators from gambling corporations did not end up in the final version.

When Governor Cuomo announced his plan to create new gambling centers in New York, he said he also wanted to ban campaign contributions from gambling entities to state lawmakers.

NY Gov. Cuomo Achieves Partial Win on Agenda

Jun 19, 2013
Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

Deals have been reached between Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders on siting new casinos and creating tax free zones at college campuses. But a bill on abortion rights was struggling, and reform measures appear dead for the session. 

The agreement on casinos would allow four resort style gambling centers; one in the Capital Region, one in the Southern Tier, and possibly two in the Catskills, if voters approve the change to the state’s constitution in the fall.     

Nassau and Suffolk Counties would  be allowed to open more slot machines, under the terms of the bill.

A state senator from the Hudson Valley has introduced legislation that would allow for up to seven casino licenses, three of which would be for the Catskills.

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — The state gambling commission is hearing from advocates and opponents of extending an Indian tribe's exclusive right to develop a casino in southeastern Massachusetts.

The commission met Thursday at Bristol Community College in Fall River as it considers opening the region to commercial bidders.

Office of New York State Senator Kathy Marchione

Casino gambling and New York’s new gun law, the SAFE Act, have emerged as two issues in Albany sparking a good deal of debate this session. Republican State Senator Kathy Marchione, of Saratoga and Rensselaer Counties, is leading an effort to repeal the gun law passed earlier this year in New York, and the first year lawmaker is also backing a measure that would require the locations of casinos to be known before lawmakers approve a constitutional amendment to allow them on non-Indian land.

BOSTON (AP) — The gambling industry spent $2.3 million dollars lobbying Beacon Hill lawmakers in 2012, a drop from the $3.1 million spent by the industry in Massachusetts in 2011.

A review of lobbying records by The Associated Press found that despite the decline, companies hoping to land one of the state's coveted casino license still poured hundreds of thousands into lobbying.

Triin Q/Flickr

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — Springfield's mayor has decided to open host community negotiations with each of the two companies hoping to develop casinos in the western Massachusetts city.

Mayor Domenic Sarno made the announcement on Monday after an internal review by the city of both casino proposals, one by MGM Resorts International and the other by Penn National Gaming.

The city could have chosen to negotiate with just one developer. The plan to begin negotiations with both companies does not guarantee that agreements will be struck with one or both.

Triin Q/Flickr

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Legislative leaders say they aren't sold on Governor Andrew Cuomo's proposal to restrict new casinos to three upstate locations and could push for New York City and Long Island venues.

The leaders met with Cuomo in a closed-door session Wednesday. Afterward, they said the issue of where to put casinos isn't settled.

Cuomo has proposed three privately run casinos off Indian land to boost the upstate economy. He says they'd draw visitors from New York City and Long Island, which have stronger economies.

The detailed plans and related documents for two competing resort casino proposals in Springfield Massachusetts have been made public. 


 

WAMC

Eleven applications have been filed for lucrative gaming licenses in Massachusetts. Companies that want to develop resort  casinos  or a slots parlor had to meet a 5PM Tuesday deadline to file paperwork and a non-refundable $400,000 fee with the Massachusetts Gaming Commission.

       Massachusetts Gaming Commission Chairman Steve Crosby was thrilled. He said the state is primed to achieve maximum job creation and revenue from its fledgling gambling industry.

BOSTON (AP) — Seven companies hoping to build casinos in Massachusetts have plunked down $400,000 each in nonrefundable application fees ahead of a key deadline.

A 2011 law signed by Gov. Deval Patrick allows up to three casinos in Massachusetts.

Among those jumping into the casino race is Las Vegas developer Steve Wynn who has eyed a site in Everett.

Others who have paid the fee and submitted applications include: MGM Springfield; Penn National Gaming, Inc.; Plainridge Racecourse; Hard Rock; and Mohegan Sun.

Hard Rock Hotels and Casinos

The competition to build a resort casino in western Massachusetts became more robust Friday. Hard Rock International unveiled plans for an entertainment complex in West Springfield on the grounds where the Big E agricultural fair is held.  WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief  Paul Tuthill reports.

WAMC

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has begun several days of meetings  to address dozens of policy questions.   It’s a prelude to the commissioners writing the final regulations to fully implement the year old gambling law and license resort casinos.   WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

       The gaming commissioners, meeting in Boston, voted unanimously Tuesday to set a policy that bans a community from holding a referendum on a casino project until it has been determined the developer is suitable to hold a gaming license in Massachusetts. 

Two high powered casino operators affirmed their commitments this week to pursue projects in Springfield Massachusetts.  Officials in Holyoke, a late entry to the western Massachusetts casino competition, are moving to form committees to review proposals from developers.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief  Paul Tuthill has an update on the fast moving casino story.

Political leaders and casino executives met late last week in Atlantic City for the 16th annual East Coast Gaming Congress and Hospitality Forum, where panelists said that individual states will likely begin approving internet gambling over the next two years because partisan gridlock in Congress.

The five member Massachusetts Gaming Commission held its first public meeting Tuesday as it set about to bring casino gambling to the state.   WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

     Declaring  the decades long debate over whether to bring casinos to Massachusetts is over, Stephen Crosby, the chairman of the powerful gaming commission, said he and the other four appointees were ready to get to work to implement the public policy in the best way they can.  He pledged that much of that work would take place in full public view.

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