Supporters say Hillary Clinton has turned a corner in the presidential race.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Representative Elizabeth Esty continues her conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Vermont will get $4 million during the next four years from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to prevent overdose deaths caused by prescription opiate drugs.

"Ebola virus particles" by Thomas W. Geisbert, Boston University School of Medicine/Wikimedia Commons

The Ebola scare in the United States is reaching a fever pitch. Federal health officials say most American hospitals can safely treat the virus, but are we really prepared to face it? We’re here with Karen Duus, assistant professor at the Center for Immunology and Microbial Disease at Albany Medical College.

9/24/14 Panel

Sep 24, 2014


  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Obama on ISIS
Ebola CDC Prediction
Climate Change/Obama UN


Cases of enterovirus EV-D68 have been confirmed in the Capital Region and Central New York. The once “rare” virus has been affecting children.

The virus is associated with cases of severe respiratory illness among children and other individuals, sometimes resulting in hospitalization, especially among children with asthma. The New York State Department of Health said Friday at least 12 children in New York have contracted D68.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Carol E. Davis

  An official with the Centers for Disease Control says so far the flu season has been spotty, with more cases reported in the South than in the Northeast. Dr. Alicia Fry, the team leader with the Prevention branch of the CDC’s Influenza Division, says the worst is still to come since the flu season usually peaks between January and March, and is urging everyone who has not been vaccinated to get a flu shot.

Photo by Scott Bauer (USDA ARS)

A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks at whether spraying yards with pesticides reduces the risk of contracting a tick-borne disease. In New York, the study focused on Dutchess County.