charter reform

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Supporters of changing Saratoga Springs’ system of government are preparing for a narrow defeat after the counting of absentee ballots.

Bob Turner
Lucas Willard / WAMC

After 18 months of public hearings, testimony and campaigning, charter change advocates in Saratoga Springs are coming to terms with what appears to be a razor-thin defeat. The periodic vote to change the city’s commission-style form of government to one led by an appointed city manager was too close to call on Election Night. After absentee ballots were tallied Tuesday, “no” had a 10-vote lead with 18 military ballots still out. Skidmore College professor Bob Turner chaired the Saratoga Springs Charter Review Commission.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The outcome of a ballot referendum on Saratoga Springs’ city charter may be determined Tuesday.

After polls were closed on Election Night, votes to change Saratoga Springs’ system of government were up by 48. More than 500 absentee ballots have not been counted.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The Saratoga Springs Charter Review Commission is now sending information to homes in the Spa City about the proposed city charter on the ballot Election Day. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard was at the Commission’s meeting Thursday night when the documents were approved.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The estimated financial savings of a proposed city charter change in Saratoga Springs have been disputed between supporters and opponents. This week, the city’s Charter Review Commission plans to approve and release more details on the document.

Voters in Saratoga Springs will vote tomorrow on how the city government will be structured. A charter change is on the ballot. Voters can stay with the current commissioner form of government or decide to change to a council-manager form of government. For more on the charter question, WAMC’s Brian Shields spoke with Saratogian city desk reporter Lucian McCarty.