childhood

  The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is a volunteer-driven charity committed to funding the most promising research to find cures for childhood cancers and give survivors long, healthy lives. The St. Baldrick's Foundation is the world’s largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants, making more than $24.5 million in new grants last year.

This Saturday, May 2nd, from 10am-4pm, this year’s annual head-shaving event and fundraiser will take place at Proctors in Schenectady, NY.

We are joined now by Mike DeBritz, the founder and Volunteer Event Coordinator for the St.Baldrick's headshaving at Proctor's and Tina Lee, 4 year shavee, captain of team Cue Balls for a Cure, Committee volunteer, and co-emcee of the event. 

  When ADHD first appeared in the DSM in 1987, 3 percent of U.S. children were thought to have the disorder. By 2000, the number increased to 7 percent. In 2014 that number jumped to an alarming 11 percent of children and 15 percent of high school students. Two-thirds of these children are on medication. In contrast, in countries like France, Finland, the UK and Japan, the number is a half of one percent, and far fewer children taking medication.

In the new book: A Disease Called Childhood: Why ADHD Became an American Epidemic, Dr. Marilyn Wedge brings together the latest developments in neuroscience and clinical research, a history of big pharma and psychiatry, and cultural studies of educational systems around the world.

    Neil Gaiman, one of the world's most beloved fantasy authors, is known for his eclectic work including: The Sandman, Stardust, American Gods, Coraline and The Graveyard Book.

Now he's written his first novel for adults in eight years, The Ocean at the End of the Lane - a bewitching and harrowing tale of mystery and survival, and memory and magic which makes the impossible all too real.