children

  In Raising Human Beings, internationally renowned child psychologist and New York Times bestselling author of Lost at School and The Explosive Child Ross W. Greene Ph.D. explains how to cultivate a better parent-child relationship while also nurturing empathy, honesty, resilience, and independence.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we are learning about Taylor’s Heroes – a non-profit organization that provides fitness and nutrition programs to children who want to lead a more active and healthy lifestyle. 

We are joined by Leslie Forbert Miller, co-founder and President of Taylor's Heroes; and Beverly Benifer, Taylor’s Heroes new Health Coach, a practicing Physical Therapist and owner of Karmic Synergy.

Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons.

In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue.

  The 16th annual Saratoga Choral Festival takes place at the Spa Little Theater in Spa State Park - this Sunday, July 31st, at 3:00 PM. The festival will present a concert of music for children featuring a semi-staged production of the popular Magic Tree House: The Musical. 

The Magic Tree House: The Musical is based on the popular series of children’s books by Mary Pope Osborne. This show has seen sold out performances for its national tour. Several musical selections have been adapted for chorus, and special guest performers from the Saratoga Children’s Theater will provide extra speaking roles and also sing with the choir.

Also included on the program - Never-Ending Song, a Young Person’s Guide to the Choir. Originally premiered by the Vancouver Chamber Choir in 2001, the Never-Ending Song takes children through a brief history of choral singing through music.

The Saratoga Choral Festival began in the summer of 2001 and we are joined by Festival Director, Andrea Goodman, and by chorus members Mira DeGregory and Jackson Cherry. 

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Adam Chaskin is the Executive Director of the Sidney Albert Albany JCC and he joins us now to talk about Camp Courage, which is entering its second year, and is designed to help underprivileged kids from the Albany City School District fighting childhood obesity partake in the JCC’s Summer Camp activities, and also have counselling on nutrition, exercise, etc. to help build a lifetime of good habits.

  Are children and adolescents being silenced and their growth stunted in the age of quick diagnoses and overmedication?

In The Silenced Child, Dr. Claudia Gold shows the tremendous power of listening in parent/child and doctor/patient relationships.

Claudia Gold, MD practices behavioral pediatrics in Great Barrington, MA. The author of Keeping Your Child In Mind, her articles on behavioral and mental health issues, in print and online, are widely followed. She is a graduate of the scholar’s program of the Berkshire Psychoanalytic Institute, and of the UMass Boston Infant-Parent Mental Health Fellowship.

  The Roundabout Theatre Company in New York City is celebrating it’s 50th Anniversary this year. The largest non-for-profit theatre company in America, Roundabout has grown from a small 150-seat theatre in a converted supermarket basement to operating five stages on and off Broadway.

Education at Roundabout is a branch of the organization that connects with students and teachers through customized school partnerships, residency programs, mentorships and workshops, internships, apprenticeships, backstage tours, talkbacks and pre-show workshops. For each Roundabout production, Education also creates Upstage guides, which include interviews, contextual information, teacher resources and activities, and presents a post-show Lecture Series -- reaching 22,000 students and teachers each year.

Jennifer DiBella is the Director of Education at Roundabout.

Education at Roundabout’s 6th Annual Student Theatre Arts Festival will take place on May 16th.

  In his new book Creative Schools, Sir Ken Robinson offers a roadmap to parents, educators and administrators on how to transform the way our schools work, highlighting schools around the world that have already begun this process and giving practical examples of what works.

One of the schools Robinson profiles is Smokie Road Middle School in Newnan, Georgia, which had the odds stacked against it with consistently low academic achievement ratings and a high poverty level. When a new principal arrived and focused on the everyday needs of each individual student and strove to meet those needs by prioritizing what the student found to be important - she had dramatic results and saw improvement on every level.

  Ben Applebaum and Dan DiSorbo have coauthored several humorous pop culture books together. Their latest is Recess: From Dodgeball to Double Dutch: Classic Games for Players of Today , an illustrated guide to the best games of the playground, for inside and outside.

Ben Applebaum joins us to tell us more.

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New York state would make it illegal to leave a child younger than 8 in a vehicle alone, under legislation that has won passage in the state Senate.

  Over the course of her career, psychologist Joanne Ruthsatz has quietly assembled the largest-ever research sample of child prodigies. Their accomplishments are epic. One could reproduce radio tunes by ear on a toy guitar at two years old. Another was a thirteen-year-old cooking sensation. And what Ruthsatz’s investigation revealed is noth­ing short of astonishing.

Though the prodigies aren’t autistic, many have autistic family members. Each prodigy has an extraordinary memory and a keen eye for detail—well-known but often-overlooked strengths associated with autism.

Each prodigy has an extraordinary memory and a keen eye for detail—well-known but often-overlooked strengths associated with autism. Ruthsatz and her daughter and coauthor, Kim­berly Stephens, now propose a startling possibility: What if the abilities of child prodigies stem from a genetic link with autism?

Their book is The Prodigy's Cousin: The Family Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Talent.

    

  Over 2 million of the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants have lived in the U.S. since childhood. Due to our current immigration system they grow up to uncertain futures.

In the new book, Lives in Limbo, Roberto Gonzales introduces us to two groups: the college goers like Ricardo who had good grades and a strong network of community support that propelled him to college and dream act organizing, but still landed in a factory job a few short years after graduation. The other group, the early exiters like Gabriel, who failed to make meaningful connection in high school and started navigating dead end jobs, immigration check points and a world narrowly circumscribed with legal limitations.

Roberto Gonzales is assistant professor at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, his research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday  experiences of poor, minority and immigrant youth along the life course.

   Little children come into the world hardwired to learn in virtually any setting and about any matter. Yet in today’s preschool and kindergarten classrooms, learning has been reduced to scripted lessons and suspect metrics that too often undervalue a child’s intelligence while overtaxing the child’s growing brain. 

  In The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups, Christakis explains what it’s like to be a young child in America today, in a world designed by and for adults, where we have confused schooling with learning. She offers real-life solutions to real-life issues, with nuance and direction that takes us far beyond the usual prescriptions for fewer tests, more play.

  We all want our children to be happy - but should parents jump through hoops at all costs to keep them that way? Or are the parents who do so hurting their children in the long run? Parenting expert Amy McCready says it seems everywhere one looks there are preschoolers who only behave in the grocery store for a treat, narcissistic teenagers posting selfies across all forms of social media, and adult children living off their parents.

In her newest book The “Me, Me, Me” Epidemic she derails the entitlement train so many kids are riding and shows how parents can raise their children to become confident, resilient, and successful.

McCready is a self-identified “recovering yeller” and the Founder of Positive Parenting Solutions.

  American children spend four to seven minutes a day playing outdoors—90 percent less time than their parents did. Yet recent research indicates that experiences in nature are essential for healthy growth.

Yet, according to our next guest, teachers, parents, and other caregivers lack a basic understanding of how to engender a meaningful, lasting connection between children and the natural world.

Scott Sampson is a dinosaur paleontologist and host of PBS Kids’ Dinosaur Train. His new book is How to Raise a Wild Child.

  In recent years, there have been major outbreaks of whooping cough among children in California, mumps in New York, and measles in Ohio’s Amish country—despite the fact that these are all vaccine-preventable diseases.

While America is the most medically advanced place in the world, many people bypass modern medicine in favor of using their faith to fight life threatening illnesses.

According to our next guest, children suffer and die every year from treatable diseases, and in most states it is legal for parents to deny their children care for religious reasons.

Dr. Paul Offit is a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His new book is Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine.

      According to the National Center for Health Statistics, less than half of the people who get married in the United States remain with their first spouse, and less than 50 percent of children grow up with both biological parents. In short, we live in a society of blended families. Everyone who survives a divorce and enters a new family is vulnerable.

  George Glass, MD, a board-certified psychiatrist, has designed a book, Blending Families Successfully: Helping Parents and Kids Navigate the Challenges So That Everyone Ends Up Happy, to help parents understand the challenges of beginning new lives with blended families, and to help their children make the necessary adjustments.

    

  National Coming Out Day is October 11th. There is a new guide for parents to help them answer questions when their son and/or daughter come out to them. We welcome the authors of the new: This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids.

Marc Bloustein

  

Hoffman’s Playland in Colonie, New York, is closing this weekend after 62 years. The beloved kiddie park has been a summer destination for three generations of Capital Region residents. Jessica Bloustein Marshall spoke with park owner Dave Hoffman earlier this summer. He says it all started with his grandfather, who bought a parcel of land 6 miles outside of Albany in the 1930s to start a farm.

Pixabay/Public Domain

A child born in 2013 will cost a middle-income American family an average of $245,340. That’s some serious sticker shock, from a report out by the United States Department of Agriculture released this week. Of course there are inherent joys in having children. But are they becoming prohibitively expensive?

8/19/14 Panel

Aug 19, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Jim Jeffords Dies at 80
Ferguson
Glens Falls Civic Center
Mail carriers at risk
The Cost of Raising A Child

    For four consecutive years Shirley Temple was the world’s box-office champion, a record never equaled. By early 1935 her mail was reported as four thousand letters a week, and hers was the second-most popular girl’s name in the country.

What distinguished Shirley Temple from every other Hollywood star of the period—and everyone since—was how brilliantly she shone. Amid the deprivation and despair of the Great Depression, Shirley Temple radiated optimism and plucky good cheer that lifted the spirits of millions and shaped their collective character for generations to come. In The Little Girl Who Fought The Great Depression: Shirley Temple And 1930s America, distinguished cultural historian John F. Kasson shows how the most famous, adored, imitated, and commodified child in the world astonished movie goers, created a new international culture of celebrity, and revolutionized the role of children as consumers.

One in three American children will be arrested by the time they are twenty-three, and many will spend time locked inside horrific detention centers that defy everything we know about how to rehabilitate young offenders.

In a clear-eyed indictment of the juvenile justice system run amok, award-winning journalist Nell Bernstein shows that there is no right way to lock up a child. The very act of isolation denies delinquent children the thing that is most essential to their growth and rehabilitation: positive relationships with caring adults.

    The Double H Ranch/SeriousFun Camp, co-founded by Charles R. Wood and Paul Newman, provides specialized programs and year-round support for children and their families dealing with life-threatening illnesses.

Paul Newman's youngest daughter, Clea Newman, joined SeriousFun Children's Network as a Senior Director of External Affairs in January 2013, where she works as part of the advancement team to raise money to support SeriousFun Camps and Programs around the world. She also serves as a spokesperson for the organization.

Clean Newman joined us to talk about the SeriousFun's 23rd Annual Gala, taking place tonight at 5pm at The Great Escape and Splashwater Kingdom.

    

  Parents are accused of being both permissive and overprotective, unwilling to set limits and afraid to let their kids fail. Young people, meanwhile, are routinely described as entitled and narcissistic...among other unflattering adjectives.

In The Myth of the Spoiled Child, Alfie Kohn systematically debunks these beliefs--not only challenging erroneous factual claims but also exposing the troubling ideology that underlies them. Complaints about pushover parents and coddled kids are hardly new, he shows, and there is no evidence that either phenomenon is especially widespread today--let alone more common than in previous generations.

    

  In her new memoir, The Madwoman in the Volvo, writer and performer Sandra Tsing Loh tells the story of her personal roller coaster of menopause. It includes an affair with a married man, the explosion of her marriage, and the pressure of keeping her daughters off of Facebook while managing the legal and marital hijinks of her eighty-nine-year-old dad. 
 


Surprisingly, deeper research into the biological science of menopause suggests that this is all normal. Loh deduces that this midlife “madness” is less about menopause than about the madness of the world: trying to maintain appearances during an epic hormonal (physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual) change.

Sandra Tsing Loh is a contributing editor to The Atlantic and the author of five previous books. She is a regular commentator on NPR’s Morning Edition and PRI’s This American Life and has performed two solo shows off-Broadway.

    

  Kids R Kids is a Beacon based, volunteer run program that works to reduce childhood hunger by providing free, nourishing summer lunches to children in need. In 2013, Kids R Kids provided over 61,000 summer meals in Dutchess County.

For Goodness Bake is a bake sale to raise funds and awareness for the Kids R Kids Feeding Program – taking place this Saturday, May 10th from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM in the park on the corner of Main Street and Cross Street in Beacon, NY.

Some of the Hudson Valley’s most celebrated amateur and professional bakers and confectioners are donating their time and talents to the bake sale.

Here to tell us more are Kristen Cronin and Tara Tornello, co-planners of For Goodness Bake, and Jackie Bucelot-Mills, the Executive Director of the Kids R Kids Feeding Program.

Listener Essay - Folding Laundry

Apr 3, 2014

    Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.

Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, Andrew Solomon’s book on parents, children and the bond between them and the cases of extreme difference - was published to ecstatic acclaim last year - landing on best-seller lists across the country, and "Best of" lists from The New York Times, Amazon, The Economist and more.

The book has now been released in paperback. Solomon opens Far From the Tree with an autobiographical chapter detailing his experience as a gay son of heterosexual parents. At the time of his youth, homosexuality was considered an illness and a crime. The book is about the struggle for those who are different and their need to find their own identity.

    We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight MASS Humanities and their Family Adventures in Reading program. The idea is to explore diversity, knowing about the world; children responding to humanities themes through literature and illustration. The program emphasizes the importance of adult-child interaction with reading and conversation.

To discuss, we welcome, Mary Jo Maichack - a national award-winning singer, storyteller and creative teaching artist; and Hayley Wood - a Senior program Officer at Mass Humanities. She is the editor of Mass Humanities' blog, The Public Humanist and she manages Family Adventures in Reading.

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