children's book

  The Hudson Children's Book Festival, established in 2009, strives to create, sustain, and nurture a culture of literacy in partnership with our community and schools.

The event is free and open to the public and this year’s festival – the 8th annual – is this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Jr./Sr. High on Harry Howard Ave. in Hudson, New York.

Here to tell us more are Jennifer Clark, Co-Director, Hudson Children's Book Festival and children’s book authors, Mark Teague and James Preller.

  Eric Luper is an author for young readers. In addition to two series with Scholastic Books called Key Hunters and The Chocolate Lab, Eric writes for Cartoon Network for shows including The Amazing World of Gumball, The Regular Show, and Teen Titans Go!

He also has written titles for Scooby-Doo, Star Trek, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

Eric will be visiting the Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza on Saturday afternoon at 1PM to sign copies of the first two books of Key Hunters, a new adventure series for readers 6 to 9. 

  Even as a child, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shocked by the terrible and unfair way African-American people were treated. When he grew up, he decided to do something about it—peacefully, with powerful words.

His story is told in the latest book in Brad Meltzer's New York Times Bestselling "Ordinary People Change the World" series, I am Martin Luther King Jr.

  Through dark forests, over tall mountains, and across a desert of ice, the Polar Express makes its way to the city atop the world, where the boy will make his Christmas wish.

For millions of readers worldwide, Chris Van Allsburg's mysterious journey to the North Pole has become a beloved classic and there is a new 30th anniversary edition this year with a new jacket design and expanded interior layout. The book also includes an author’s note, downloadable audio read by Liam Neeson, and golden "All Aboard" ornament.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region. Today we're talking with Maria Tatar, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University.

She's written and translated several books on fairy tales, and she describes how seemingly simple stories like “Little Red Riding Hood,” and “Beauty and the Beast,” challenge us to think a little harder as we try to decode the cultural contradictions in them. The Vermont Humanities Fall Conference “Why Do Stories Matter?” will take place November 13–14 at the Dudley Davis Center at the University of Vermont and our guest, Maria Tatar will participate.

  As written and read by Joe Donahue:

I was obsessed with books, even as a kid. And my favorites were those by A.A. Milne about a very special bear – Winnie-the Pooh. As an adult, I became obsessed with the place where Pooh, Christopher Robin, and their friends live and play. The Hundred Acre Wood—the setting for Winnie-the-Pooh’s adventures—was inspired by Ashdown Forest, a wildlife haven that spans more than 6,000 acres in southeast England.

I went trekking through the forest last December – one of the most meaningful adventures I have ever been on. So, when I first learned of Kathryn Aalto’s new book - The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh – I felt like it was written just for me.

In the pages of the book you can visit the ancient black walnut tree on the edge of the forest that became Pooh’s house, go deep into the pine trees to find Poohsticks Bridge, and climb up to the top of the enchanted Galleons Lap, where Pooh says goodbye to Christopher Robin.

  A young lad who would rather draw than do math, spell, or gargle finds the perfect outlet for his always-on imagination in this manifesto to creative joie de vivre, featuring a book within a book, from the brilliant minds that brought you The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore.

Full of nostalgic references to a time when TV was black-and-white and Sunday newspapers had things called the funnies, this wildly fun story-within-a-story is based loosely on children’s book legend William Joyce’s third grade year, and includes a sewn-in mini-book of that tale of the world’s smartest booger.

  Hannah Moushabeck, Children's Director for The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA joins us with this week's list.

List:
Heather Has Two Mommies by Lesléa Newman and Laura Cornell
Nightbird by Alice Hoffman
Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl's Courage Changed Music by Margarita Engle and Rafael López
Baby Love by Angela DiTerlizzi and Brooke Boynton Hughes
The League of Beastly Dreadfuls Book 1 by Holly Grant
Denton Little's Deathdate by Lance Rubin
Nimona by Noelle Stevenson

  The 20th Anniversary Edition of The Christmas Alphabet, Robert Sabuda's classic pop-up title - that was his first New York Times Bestseller - has just been released. As part of the roll-out of the title he'll be appearing at a special events sponsored by Oblong Books and Music during the Rhinebeck Sinterklaas Festival on December 6th at 4pm.

   Today's Book Picks list comes from Patricia Vunk of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
Journey by Aaron Becker
Quest by Aaron Becker
The Farmer and the Clown by Marla Frazee
Mr. Wuffles! by David Wiesner
The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak
Mouse Mansion by Karina Schaapman
Sam and Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen
Sparky by Jenny Offill and Chris Appelhans
The Witch's Boy by Kelly Barnhill
Jackaby by William Ritter
Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
Anatomy of a Misfit by Andrea Portes
Geography of You and Me by Jennifer E. Smith

Pages