CIA

  In June of 2013, Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old former CIA employee, thrust himself into the spotlight when he leaked thousands of top secret National Security Agency (NSA) documents to the journalist, Glen Greenwald. Immediately branded as a whistleblower, Snowden reignited an international debate about private citizens who reveal government secrets that should be exposed but may endanger the lives of citizens.

Like the late Karen Silkwood, whose death in a car accident while bringing incriminating evidence against her employer to a meeting with a New York Times reporter, is still a mystery, Snowden was intent upon revealing the controversial practices of his employer, a government contractor.

Rightly or wrongly, Snowden and Silkwood believed that their revelations would save lives. In his book, The Whistleblower's Dilemma: Snowden, Silkwood And Their Quest For the Truth, Richard Rashke weaves between the lives of these two controversial figures and creates a narrative context for a discussion of what constitutes a citizen’s duty to reveal or not to reveal.

  For forty years John Hadden and his father of the same name fought at the dinner table over politics, art, and various issues concerning America. One was haunted by what he had witnessed during his long CIA career, from Berlin to Tel Aviv; the other retreated to the Vermont woods to direct Shakespeare until finally he confronted his father at the table one last time with a tape recorder.

His book, Conversations with a Masked Man is a series of conversations Hadden had with his father about the older man's thirty-year career as a CIA officer and how American policy affected the family and the world.

John Hadden has worked in the theater for forty years. He was artistic director of the Hubbard Hall Theater Company, a founding member of Shakespeare & Co, associate artist with We Players, and cofounder and artistic director of Counterpoint Theater in Boston. His solo show, Travels with a Masked Man, is composed of excerpts from the book.

  How did American intelligence respond to terrorism, a major war and the most sweeping technological revolution in the last 500 years? Why did NSA begin the controversial terrorist surveillance program that included the acquisition of domestic phone records?

General Michael Hadyen, the only person ever to helm both CIA and NSA, offers an insider's look at America’s intelligence wars in his new book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror.

For ten years, Hayden participated in every major event in American national security, the fallout and consequences of which are still unfolding today.

Cornell University is home to a major resource from the Nuremberg trials collected by the New York native who founded the forerunner of the CIA.

  

  In The Great War of Our Time: The CIA's Fight Against Terrorism--From al Qa'ida to ISIS, recently retired Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Michael Morrell uses his talents to offer an unblinking and insightful assessment of CIA's counterterrorism successes and failures of the past twenty years.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. Today we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council and a speaker in their First Wednesdays lecture series. Haviland Smith, Former CIA Chief of Counterterrorism, will be talking about "Dealing with Foreign Terrorism" in Montpelier, Vermont on Wednesday, March 4.

He will examine the history of foreign terrorism directed against US interests, our policy for dealing with it, and how we might do better. He joins us along with Sylvia Plumb, Vermont Humanities Director of Communications.

  The First American-Afghan War, a CIA war, was approved by President George W. Bush and directed by the author, Robert Grenier, the CIA station chief in Islamabad. Forging separate alliances with warlords, Taliban dissidents, and Pakistani intelligence, Grenier launched the “southern campaign,” orchestrating the final defeat of the Taliban and Hamid Karzai’s rise to power in eighty-eight chaotic days.

Grenier writes about the war - what happened and what is meant - in his book, 88 Days to Kandahar: A CIA Diary.

1/27/15 Panel

Jan 27, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Snow! (?), Koch Bros. Budget, White House Drone, Jeffrey Sterling Convicted, and Sheldon Silver.

Senate investigators have delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogation practices after the 9/11 attacks, accusing the agency of inflicting pain and suffering on prisoners with tactics that went well beyond legal limits.

  Assassination has been dramatized by literature and politicized by infamous murders throughout history, and for former CIA agent and bestselling author Robert Baer - it’s a source of endless fascination, speculation, and intrigue.

In his new book, The Perfect Kill, Baer wraps a captivating look at the history and theory of political assassination around the tale of his dangerous, two-decade-long pursuit of one of the world’s deadliest assassins, Hajj Radwan. Hajj Radwan was at the center of all of Hezbollah’s mayhem from the 1980s until his own assassination in 2008.

Robert Baer is one of the most accomplished agents in CIA history, and a winner of the Career Intelligence Medal. He is currently the national security affairs analyst for CNN.

    Pulitzer Prize winning reporter James Risen's new book is Pay Any Price: Greed, Power, and Endless War. For his efforts, especially in his previous best-selling book, State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration, he has become a target of both the Bush and Obama administrations and still faces the threat of jail time for his refusal to reveal how he found out so much information about an important story of CIA bungling.

In his new book he weaves several stories into the broadest canvas yet - a picture of how, he says, our endless war on terror has so corrupted us, so vastly warped the use of state power that America is waging wars on decency and truth.

10/22/14 Panel

Oct 22, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant Libby Post, and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Ben Bradlee
Marijuana
Cybersecurity and iCloud in China
CIA on Panetta
Ukraine Economy
Renee Zellweger

  Twenty-five years ago when Mathew Burrows went to work for the CIA as an intelligence analyst, the world seemed frozen. Then came the fall of the Berlin Wall and the implosion of the Soviet Union; suddenly, unpredictability became a universal theme and foresight was critical. For the past decade, Burrows has overseen the creation of the Global Trends report—the key futurist guide for the White House, Departments of State and Defense, and Homeland Security.

In The Future, Declassified: Megatrends That Will Undo the World Unless We Take Action, Burrows has expanded the most recent Global Trends report into a full-length narrative, forecasting the tectonic shifts that will drive us to 2030.

7/11/14 Panel

Jul 11, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political activist Libby Post and newsman Ray Graf.

Topics include:
Obama Travel
German CIA Anger
Colorado Race for Women's Vote
Boehner's Lawsuit
Chinese Hackers

HV Post Office To Be Named For Fallen CIA Agent

Jun 18, 2014
Office of Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney

The first post office in the United States to be named in memory of a CIA agent is in the Hudson Valley, in Orange County.

The U.S. House of Representatives voted unanimously to approve Democratic Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney’s legislation to rename the post office on Route 17M in Monroe as the “National Clandestine Service of the Central Intelligence Agency NCS Officer Gregg David Wenzel Memorial Post Office.”

5/27/14 Panel

May 27, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and Political Consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
Ukraine Post-Vote
CIA oops
Trade Recognition
California Shooting
Amazon v. Hachette
Pfizer
VA Groups

    Last week’s CIA criticism by Senator Dianne Feinstein is the latest chapter in the public debate over spying.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that “things are out of control” when it comes to intelligence.

Valerie Plame, whose cover as a CIA agent was famously blown during the Bush Administration, joins us to talk about the new thriller she has written, Blowback.

In the book, Covert CIA ops officer Vanessa Pierson is finally close to capturing the world’s most dangerous international nuclear arms dealer: Bhoot, alias the ghost. One of her assets has information about Bhoot’s upcoming visit to a secret underground nuclear weapons facility in Iran—in only a few days. But just as Pierson’s informant is about to give her the location, they’re ambushed by an expert sniper. Pierson narrowly escapes. Her asset: dead.

    On the night of September 11, 2012, the American diplomatic mission at Benghazi, Libya, came under ferocious attack by a heavily armed group of Islamic terrorists. The prolonged firefight, and the attack hours later on a nearby CIA outpost, resulted in the deaths of four Americans.

Under Fire: The Untold Story of the Attack in Benghazi is based on the exclusive cooperation of eyewitnesses and confidential sources within the intelligence, diplomatic, and military communities, and in the book, Fred Burton and Samuel M. Katz reveal for the first time the terrifying twelve-hour ordeal confronted by Ambassador Christopher Stevens, Sean Smith, his Diplomatic Security (DS) contingent, and the CIA security specialists who raced to rescue them.

Tasked with helping draft a constitution for India after World War II, B. N. Rau traveled abroad speaking to jurists. In Washington, Supreme Court Justice Frankfurter advised Rau not to include a due process clause in the Indian Constitution. Instead India should have a clause simply requiring that no one be charged with a crime but by the law of the land. That was the meaning of the Magna Carta in 1215 which said:

No freemen shall be taken or imprisoned … or in any way destroyed … except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land.

CIA Awards Tonight

Mar 29, 2012

The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park is presenting its 2012
Leadership Awards tonight - Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Dave Lucas has
more...

The New York gala is an annual scholarship fundraiser for The Culinary
Institute of America, which for more than six decades has been setting
the standard for excellence in professional culinary education.