city

William W. Goldsmith is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. He is coauthor of Separate Societies: Poverty and Inequality in U.S. Cities.

In his new book, Saving Our Cities, William W. Goldsmith shows how cities can be places of opportunity rather than places with problems. With strongly revived cities and suburbs, working as places that serve all their residents, metropolitan areas will thrive, thus making the national economy more productive, the environment better protected, the citizenry better educated, and the society more reflective, sensitive, and humane.

In The Well-Tempered City, Jonathan F. P. Rose distills a lifetime of interdisciplinary research and firsthand experience into a five-pronged model for how to design and reshape our cities with the goal of equalizing their landscape of opportunity.

Rose works with cities and not-for-profits to plan and build green affordable and mixed-income housing and cultural, health, and educational centers. Recognized for creating communities that literally heal both residents and neighborhoods, Rose is one of the nation's leading thinkers on the integration of environmental, social, and economic solutions to the urban issues facing us today.

  Janette Sadik-Khan is one of the world’s foremost authorities on transportation and urban transformation. During her time as New York City’s Transportation Commissioner from 2007 to 2013, under former mayor Michael Bloomberg, Janette Sadik-Khan transformed the streets of one of the world’s toughest cities into dynamic spaces that are safe for pedestrians and bikers. Now a principal with Bloomberg Associates, Sadik-Khan works with mayors around the world to reimagine and redesign their cities.

In Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution, Sadik-Khan provides a roadmap for rethinking, reinvigorating, and redesigning city streets across the country to function better for the people and communities that use them. The book was co-authored by Seth Solomonow who joins us along with Janette Sakid-Khan.

    Moses Gates is a new breed of adventurer for the 21st century. He thrives on the thrill of seeing what others do not see, let alone even know exists. It all began quite innocuously. After moving to New York City and pursuing graduate studies in Urban Planning, he began unearthing hidden facets of the city—abandoned structures, disused subway stops, incredible rooftop views that belonged to cordoned-off buildings.

In his memoir of his experiences, Hidden Cities, Gates details his travels through underground canals, sewers, subways, and crypts, in metropolises spanning four continents.

Gates describes his immersion in the worldwide subculture of urban exploration; how he joined a world of people who create secret art galleries in subway tunnels, break into national monuments for fun, and travel the globe sleeping in centuries-old catacombs and abandoned Soviet relics rather than hotels or bed-and-breakfasts.

  Jeff Speck has dedicated his career to determining what makes cities thrive. And he has boiled it down to one key factor: walkability.

We welcome David Talbot and speak with him about his book, Season of the Witch: Enchantment, Terror and Deliverance in the City of Love, which tells the story of San Francisco between 1967 and 1982.