civil rights

The Roundtable
11:25 am
Wed November 6, 2013

"The Investigator" Terry Lenzner

For 5 decades Terry Lenzner has been one of Washington’s most powerful inside players working behind the scenes to get to the bottom of scandals, controversies, and mysteries ranging from the murder of three young civil rights workers that inspired the film Mississippi Burning, to Watergate, the impeachment of President Clinton, and the death of Princess Diana.

Now for the first time he tells the story of his remarkable half century career probing politicians, celebrities, governments, and corporations in The Investigator.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Rep. John Lewis - "Across That Bridge"

  We speak with United States Congressman, John Lewis, about his new book, Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change.

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New England News
6:40 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

City of Pittsfield Addresses Affirmative Action

Now, a warning to our listeners that next story contains language that some people might find offensive.

An affirmative action forum in Pittsfield is taking place during a week of civil rights remembrance nationally.

“He said ‘I’d expect that from a nigger, but not from a boy like you.”

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New England News
1:04 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

Great Barrington to Commemorate Civil Rights Leader

Great Barrington will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the death of W.E.B Du Bois on Saturday.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

At a time when millions of Americans are celebrating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, people from the Berkshires are recognizing another civil rights milestone.

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Arts & Culture
10:10 am
Mon July 8, 2013

"Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent" at The Tang

    Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full-scale survey of more than thirty years of work by artist and designer Corita Kent. A teacher at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles and a civil rights, feminist, and anti-war activist, Corita, as she is commonly referred to, was one of the most popular American graphic artists of the 1960s and ’70s.

While several exhibitions have focused on Corita’s 1960s serigraphs, Someday is Now is the first major museum show to survey her entire career, including early abstractions and text pieces as well as the more lyrical works made in the 1970s and 1980s. The exhibition includes over 200 serigraph prints, as well as rarely exhibited photographs Corita used for teaching and documentary purposes.

Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum, joins us in Studio A.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu May 16, 2013

"Ghosts of Jim Crow" by F. Michael Higginbotham

    When America inaugurated its first African American president, in 2009, many wondered if the country had finally become a "post-racial" society.

In Ghosts of Jim Crow, F. Michael Higginbotham argues that America remains far away from that imagined utopia.

New England News
3:45 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

US Attorney For Massachusetts Talks At Conference About Civil Rights Enforcement

The top federal law enforcement official in Massachusetts highlighted efforts to enforce civil rights laws during a speech in Springfield on Friday. The U.S. Attorney for Massachusetts, Carmen Ortiz, was the keynote speaker at a conference marking the 45th anniversary of the passage of the Federal Fair Housing Act.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Wed March 27, 2013

3/27/13 - Panel

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC's News Director, Ian Pickus, and Stephen Gottlieb, the Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor at Albany Law School. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
The Supreme Court on Gay Marriage
The shaping of the Supreme Court
Nate Silver on Americans’ views on Gay Marriage
North Dakota’s strict Abortion law
Supreme Court accepts second case on race-based college admissions

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed February 13, 2013

"Eslanda: The Large and Unconventional Life of Mrs. Paul Robeson" by Barbara Ransby

Eslanda "Essie" Cardozo Goode Robeson lived a colorful and amazing life. Her career and commitments took her many places: colonial Africa in 1936, the front lines of the Spanish Civil War, the founding meeting of the United Nations, Nazi-occupied Berlin, Stalin's Russia, and China two months after Mao's revolution. She was a woman of unusual accomplishment—an anthropologist, a prolific journalist, a tireless advocate of women's rights, an outspoken anti-colonial and antiracist activist, and an internationally sought-after speaker.

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Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Phillip Hayes Dean’s "Paul Robeson" presented by Unison Arts and SUNY New Paltz

Credit unisonarts.org

  Actor, singer, athlete, scholar, and social activist, Paul Robeson, was born in 1898 and died at 77 years old in 1976 having been blacklisted during the Second Red Scare in the 1950s but – until the end of his life sticking to his political stances and his beliefs.

To celebrate Black History Month, Unison Arts in New Paltz, NY has partnered with the Black Studies and Fine and Performing Arts Departments at SUNY New Paltz to present Phillip Hayes Dean’s play Paul Robeson.

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