civil war

The Roundtable
10:33 am
Fri April 3, 2015

Ideas Matter - After Appomattox

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

One hundred fifty years ago this coming week was a ceremony that most Americans believe ended the Civil War - the surrender agreement at Appomattox Court House. What is wrong with the way we understand that event and the end of the war?

Greg Downs, Gregory Downs is an Associate Professor at the City College & Graduate Center, CUNY, and is the author of the just-published After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War, is here to tell us.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed February 11, 2015

Ulysses S. Grant And Robert E. Lee: The War They Fought, The Peace They Forged

  They met in person only four times, yet these two men—Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee—determined the outcome of America's most divisive war and cast larger-than-life shadows over their reunited nation. They came from vastly different backgrounds: Lee from a distinguished family of waning fortunes; Grant, a young man on the make in a new America. Differing circumstances colored their outlooks on life: Lee, the melancholy realist; Grant, the incurable optimist.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed February 11, 2015

'The Cause Of All Nations: An International History Of The American Civil War'

  When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in 1863, he had broader aims than simply rallying a war-weary nation. Lincoln realized that the Civil War had taken on a wider significance—that all of Europe and Latin America was watching to see whether the United States, a beleaguered model of democracy, would indeed “perish from the earth.”

In The Cause of All Nations: An International History of the American Civil War, distinguished historian Don H. Doyle explains that the Civil War was viewed abroad as part of a much larger struggle for democracy that spanned the Atlantic Ocean, and had begun with the American and French Revolutions.

The Roundtable
10:45 am
Wed February 11, 2015

Four Women Undercover In The Civil War

  In Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War, Karen Abbott illuminates one of the most fascinating yet little known aspects of the Civil War - the stories of four courageous women - a socialite, a farmgirl, an abolitionist, and a widow - who were spies.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed February 11, 2015

'The Man Who Would Not Be Washington' By Jonathan Horn

  On the eve of the Civil War, one soldier embodied the legacy of George Washington and the hopes of leaders across a divided land. Both North and South knew Robert E. Lee as the son of Washington’s most famous eulogist and the son-in-law of Washington’s adopted child. Each side sought his service for high command. Lee could choose only one.

In The Man Who Would Not Be Washington, former White House speechwriter Jonathan Horn reveals how the officer most associated with Washington went to war against the union that Washington had forged. This extensively researched and gracefully written biography follows Lee through married life, military glory, and misfortune.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed February 11, 2015

Marching Home: Union Veterans And Their Unending Civil War

  For well over a century, traditional Civil War histories have concluded in 1865, with a bitterly won peace and Union soldiers returning triumphantly home.

In his new book, Marching Home: Union Veterans And Their Unending Civil War, Civil War historian Brian Matthew Jordan creates an entirely new narrative. These veterans— tending rotting wounds, battling alcoholism, campaigning for paltry pensions— tragically realized that they stood as unwelcome reminders to a new America eager to heal, forget, and embrace the freewheeling bounty of the Gilded Age.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon November 24, 2014

The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy

  Jacopo Della Quercia is an educator and history writer who has authored more than 100 articles for the comedy website Cracked.com. His work has been featured in The New York Times best-seller: You Might Be a Zombie and Other Bad News.

His new book is the historical thriller, The Great Abraham Lincoln Pocket Watch Conspiracy. The book is an equal-parts cocktail of action, adventure, science-fiction and comedy. It follows a globe-trotting President Taft and Robert Todd Lincoln in a race to solve a mystery stretching back to the Civil War and the Lincoln assassination. Based on true events, the books describes a vast conspiracy spanning four continents and three oceans during the turn of the century.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri September 26, 2014

Ideas Matter - How The Civil War Continues To Shape Civic And Cultural Life In America

  This week in our Ideas Matter segment, we are joined by representatives from The Vermont Humanities Council to discuss their Fall conference which is entitled: A Fire Never Extinguished; How the Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue April 8, 2014

The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region's Conference

    

  This Friday, Saturday, and Sunday (April 11 – 13), The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region will present their 13th Public History Conference. This year’s conference is entitled Slavery and the Underground Railroad: the Larger Context, the Lingering Legacy and is co-sponsored by Russell Sage College, The Department of History and Society at Russell Sage College, and the Rensselaer County Historical Society.

Here now to tell us all about it are Brea Barthel, a co-coordinator of the Conference, and Professor at SUNY Albany and RPI and Paul Stewart, Scholar in Residence at Russell Sage College and co-founder of the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region.

Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Thu December 12, 2013

Stephen Lang And "The Wheatfield" At The Crandall Theatre

    Stephen Lang is a Tony Award-nominated American actor and playwright who is also well known for his film work - including his roles as George E. Pickett in Gettysburg, Stonewall Jackson in Gods and Generals, Colonel Quaritch in Avatar and many others.

This Sunday at 4pm The Chatham Film Club and the Columbia County Historical Society present an exciting combination of theater, film and music that tells the story of the Battle of Gettysburg through the eyes of Union officer and Medal of Honor Winner James Jackson Purman.

The program features a one man show written and performed by Stephen Lang, original music composed by Robert Kessler and performed by virtuoso double-bassist Timothy Cobb, and the a screening of the short film The Wheatfield, written and performed by Lang, and directed by filmmakers, Alexander and Adrian Smith. The program is hosted by historian Harold Holzer.

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