The Clark Art Museum

  The current major exhibition at Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA is An Eye for Excellence: Twenty Years of Collecting.

Sterling and Francine Clark began collecting art strictly for pleasure, but their discernment met with international recognition when they opened the Clark Art Institute in 1955. Sixty years later, the exhibition An Eye for Excellence: Twenty Years of Collecting reveals the remarkable story of how the Clark’s collection has grown and become stronger over the past two decades through the museum’s vision and the support of its generous donors. An Eye for Excellence is on view October 25, 2015 through April 10, 2016.

We visited the museum recently and took a tour of the exhibition with Kathleen Morris, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at The Clark.

  On Saturday, February 27th at The Clark in Williamstown, MA noted private collector Jon Landau, art dealer Andrew Butterfield, and former Clark Senior Curator Richard Rand discuss the collection of Renaissance and nineteenth-century painting and sculpture Landau has assembled over many years.

Using this private collection as an example, the three experts consider how collectors decide where to focus their attention, how changes in the art market have affected the practice of collecting, and related topics.

American music critic, manager, and record producer Jon Landau has managed Bruce Springsteen since 1977 and was a frequent contributor to Rolling Stone in the ’60s and ’70s.

Clark Art Institute

A new exhibit at the Clark Art Institute highlights a 20-year period of growth and expansion for the Williamstown museum.

  Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) by James McNeill Whistler is one of the most renowned works of art by an American artist. It is considered by many to be the most important American painting not on American soil.

Better known as Whistler’s Mother, the painting has been owned by the French state since 1891 and is in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris. The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, presents the painting as the centerpiece of an exhibition on view at the Lunder Center at Stone Hill through September 27th.

Jay Clark, The Clark’s Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs takes us on a tour of the exhibition.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

An iconic 19th century American painting that remains one of art’s most famous works is now on view at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts. It joins an ongoing exhibit featuring works by one of the world’s most popular artists.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

An iconic 19th century American painting that remains one of art’s most famous works will be on view July 4th at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts.

  In December 1969, the Museum of Fine Arts announced the acquisition of an unknown and un-catalogued painting attributed to Raphael. Boston’s coup made headlines around the world. Soon afterward, an Italian art sleuth began investigating the details of the painting’s export from Italy, challenging the museum’s right to ownership. Simultaneously, experts on both sides of the Atlantic debated its authenticity.

Belinda Rathbone, daughter of Perry Rathbone, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston from 1955 to 1972, will discuss her book: The Boston Raphael: A Mysterious Painting, an Embattled Museum in an Era of Change, and a Daughter’s Search for the Truth at the Clark Art Institute on Sunday, April 26th at 3 pm.

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The Clark Art Institute has picked a former president of Williams College to serve as interim director after Michael Conforti retires this August.

  During and just after World Wars I and II in Britain - in an era known as the Machine Age, the tumultuous political climate and the prevalence of industry and mechanization influenced the art created at that time.

Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection is a new exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA. The exhibition features a wide range of lithographs, dry points, woodcut prints and linocuts produced during the period exploring themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity.

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Two Berkshire County residents have announced a major donation to The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown.

Photo: Mike Agee

The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts has a stake in Sunday’s Super Bowl between the New England Patriots and the Seattle Seahawks.

  The Sterling and Francine Clark Institute in Williamstown re-opened on the Fourth of July after being closed since March for a major construction project over a decade in the making.

The Clark houses a noted collection of 18th and 19th century artwork. The $145 million project includes a new building, another building rebuilt and a complete rethinking of the Clark’s 140-acre campus, with three new reflecting pools, 2 miles of hiking paths and more than 1,000 new trees.

And then there is the amazing art. To tell us more we welcome Clark Director Michael Conforti and senior curator Richard Rand.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

The Clark Art Institute will open the doors on a heavily anticipated renovation July 4th.

Architects and museum leaders proudly showed off the refurbished 140-acre Williamstown, Massachusetts campus, envisioned through plans that began taking shape in the late 1990s, on Friday.

“People will know that they’re in the Clark, but they’ll try to figure out how it’s changed and it’s changed in a million ways,” said museum director Michael Conforti.

    The exhibition, Winslow Homer: Making Art Making History is currently on display at The Clark Art Museum in Williamstown, MA through September 8th. It features more than 200 works by Homer - spanning his career and including paintings, watercolors, drawings, etchings, lithographs, chromolithographs,wood engravings, photographs, correspondence, and books.

Homer began his career as an illustrator for the popular press, providing pictures of current events for newspapers in Boston and New York. Historians use these, as well as his paintings and watercolors, to illustrate mid-nineteenth-century 

  political and economic developments. Art historians, too, use the works to explore not only Homer’s life and endeavors, but also to consider broader questions such as the rise of the critical press, the quest for a national style, and the ramifications of the expanding nineteenth-century art market.

Michael Cassin - the Director for The Clark’s Center for Education in the Visual Arts - takes us on an audio tour of the exhibition.

    In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani discuss Bartok and music as language.

Celebrating “White Nights” of the Russian tradition, pianist Vassily Primakov and Yehuda will present a program of Russian masters Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, and Tchaikovsky, in the inaugural concert of Close Encounters With Music at the Clark Sunday, July 14 at 3 PM.

Rabbi Dan Ornstein - Lessons at the Clark

Jan 10, 2013

The Clark Art Museum once hosted an exhibition of the works of the great French artist Jacques Louis David, whose magnificent scenes chronicled the French revolution and the reign of Napoleon Bonaparte.  David was a close friend of Napoleon’s as well as his official painter. Napoleon was not at all a modest man.  He once declared, “Power is my mistress,” and looking at his life, we know that he meant it.  A brigadier general at twenty four, Napoleon’s vision of himself was matched fully by his ambitious successes.  Since it’s in the best interests of a court painter to flatter the rulers that he paints, David spared no effort to portray Napoleon, a man of no small ego and accomplishment, as smarter, braver, taller, and stronger than everyone around him.  My favorite example of David’s flattery is his painting of Napoleon crossing the Alps to defeat the Austrians.  Napoleon is dressed regally, exuding confidence, courage and power.  As his troops move forward in the background, he takes a moment from battle to look imperiously at the artist and at us. To lend even greater mightiness and grandeur to Napoleon’s image, David painted him on a sleek, muscular, white battle horse, an awesome example of natural beauty and power.