classic

"The Graduate" opened 50 years ago today.

When it premiered in December 1967, its filmmakers had only modest expectations for what seemed to be a small, sexy art-house comedy adapted from an obscure first novel by an eccentric twenty-four-year-old.

There was little indication that this offbeat story - a young man just out of college has an affair with one of his parents’ friends and then runs off with her daughter - would turn out to be a monster hit, with an extended run in theaters and seven Academy Award nominations.

    Modern life is a sea of images. With so much visual data bombarding us - from personal devices to mass media - our brains must rapidly adapt to make sense of it all.

In her new book, Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars, Camille Paglia returns to the subject that made her famous, situating our current visual environment within the scope of all of art history.

Camille Paglia is an American teacher and social critic. She has been a professor at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, since 1984.