classics

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed April 16, 2014

"The Parthenon Enigma" By Joan Breton Connelly

    

  Built in the fifth century b.c., the Parthenon has been venerated for more than two millennia as the West’s ultimate paragon of beauty and proportion. Since the Enlightenment, it has also come to represent our political ideals, the lavish temple to the goddess Athena serving as the model for our most hallowed civic architecture. But how much do the values of those who built the Parthenon truly correspond with our own?

In The Parthenon Enigma, Joan Breton Connelly challenges our most basic assumptions about the Parthenon and the ancient Athenians.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu April 10, 2014

"Dying Every Day: Seneca At The Court Of Nero" By James Romm

    James Romm, the James Ottaway Jr. Professor of Classics at Bard College is the author of several books on ancient Greek and Macedonian history and on imperial Rome. His latest book is: Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero.

At the center, the tumultuous life of Seneca, ancient Rome’s preeminent writer and philosopher, beginning with banishment in his fifties and subsequent appointment as tutor to twelve-year-old Nero, future emperor of Rome. Controlling them both, Nero’s mother, Julia Agrippina the Younger, Roman empress, great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius.

James Romm will be part of this weekend’s Read Local Red Hook Literary Festival.

The Roundtable
10:45 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Confronting The Classics With Mary Beard

    In Confronting the Classics: Traditions, Adventures, and Innovations, Mary Beard, drawing on thirty years of teaching and writing about Greek and Roman history, provides a panoramic portrait of the classical world, a book in which we encounter not only Cleopatra and Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar and Hannibal, but also the common people—the millions of inhabitants of the Roman Empire, the slaves, soldiers, and women.