Climate Change

Composite Image by Dave Lucas (WAMC)

We can't stop climate change at this point, but we can reduce how devastating it will be. That’s according to a coalition of more than 70 environmental, faith and labor groups have launched a campaign on this Earth Day to require New York to transition to 100 percent clean energy by 2030.

NASA/Public Domain

From unseasonably cold winters to dangerous summer floods, New York has faced severe weather year-round recently. On Thursday, a statewide public forum is planned to assess and address severe weather issues. WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley spoke with some of the organizers.

A Vermont Senate Committee is acknowledging that climate change is caused by people and lawmakers are renewing the state's commitment to reducing carbon emissions.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Thanks to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, April brings pilgrims to mind. Now, a group of people are days into their 12-day trek along the route of a proposed pipeline in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. WAMC’s Berkshire Bureau Chief Jim Levulis went along for a step on the pipeline pilgrimage.

FDR Site Hosts Women And Climate Change Summit

Mar 6, 2015
NASA

The Environmental Protection Agency is hosting a women’s history event Friday at the FDR site in Dutchess County. WAMC’s Allison Dunne has more. 

On Thursday, the new speaker of the New York state Assembly created a working group to review the state's response to climate change. Environmental groups are encouraged by the move and hope the legislators propose several initiatives that will help reduce New York’s greenhouse gas emissions.

I’d like to speak across the aisle. We have values in common even though we sometimes draw different conclusions. My point is simple. We are all against killing babies, their brothers, sisters, mothers and fathers. A religious revival in this country has focused on one form of what many consider baby-killing. There are, however, other ways of killing babies in unspeakable numbers.

EPA

  EPA Regional Administrator and College of St. Rose alum Judith Enck will be speaking at the College on Thursday night at 7PM. The subject? Climate Change.

2014 was the hottest year on record. Enck says the only way that we can rise to the challenge of climate change is if every one of us gets involved. She says it is important to learn the scope of the problem and the steps that the EPA is taking to fight climate change and tips on how you can help. The title of her talk is: A Call to Action.

In 2009, Judith was appointed US Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator of Region 2 by President Barack Obama. Previously, Enck was deputy secretary for the Environment in the NYS Governor's office, responsible for policies and operations of the state’s environmental protection agencies.

Winter's On A Roll

Feb 9, 2015
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The latest storm is upon us, and once again the region is dealing with slippery commutes, snow emergencies, and school closings and delays.

It's a "rinse and repeat" playback of last Monday: roads in poor condition from Rochester back through the Mohawk Valley, Hudson Valley eastward into New England and points south.  Conditions are expected to improve once the snow stops falling and the plows keep plowing.

Sally McCay/UVM Photo

A University of Vermont student will be honored at the White House on Monday.

Temperatures across New York and New England hit sub-zero levels Tuesday morning, a day after a storm dumped more than a foot of snow from Buffalo to the Hudson Valley. The Sunday-Monday snowfall has triggered several municipal snow emergencies.

The storm impacted local streets and highways. Numerous accidents were reported Tuesday and tri-city traffic was truly bumper-to-bumper as vehicles inched along for the morning rush hour commute.  But that should change as roadways are cleared.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Long-time anti-poverty advocate Mark Dunlea became the face and voice of the Hunger Action Network of New York State, leading the activist group for 29 years. He's decided to step down and pursue another cause - Dunlea recently sat down with WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has been monitoring Juno's progress throughout the day: he declared a state of emergency for all downstate counties throughout the Hudson Valley, New York City and Long Island. Juno joins a list of blizzards and “superstorms” characterized as  “unprecedented, ““crippling, “ and “historic. “ Forecasts are calling for a combination of high winds and powdery snow.

  Few issues today command our attention more than that of climate change, and few people have been tracking it longer or have spent more of their lives trying to understand and form policy to respond to it than Gus Speth.

An abbreviated list of his environmental posts includes founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council and the World Resources Institute, Environmental Advisor to Presidents Carter and Clinton, Chair of the UN Development Group, and Dean of Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

His new memoir is Angels by the River.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has filed an amendment to the bill approving the Keystone XL Pipeline which would put the Senate on record acknowledging climate change.

An important reason for New York State to ban hydraulic fracturing was the need to move from a fossil fuel-based economy to one based on non-greenhouse gas-emitting alternative fuels.

    New Yorker staff writer and best-selling author Elizabeth Kolbert offers a startling look at the mass extinction currently unfolding before us in her new book –The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History.

Over the last half billion years, there have been five major mass extinctions – we’ll learn more about the sixth with Elizabeth Kolbert.

    In This Changes EverythingNaomi Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein meticulously builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Areas along the Hudson, Mohawk and Oswego rivers will soon have new tools to warn of possible floods.  U.S. Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand have announced that the Federal Emergency Management Agency has set aside nearly $1.5 million for the installation of stream gauges in 23 counties.

A trio of storms named Irene, Lee and Sandy, changed the way New York feels about climate change.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

Blair Horner: The Growing Dangers Of Climate Change

Nov 3, 2014


As the brutal election season wraps up, the nation – and the world – received another dire warning of the growing dangers of global warming.  While the issue has been almost non-existent in the nation’s political debates, there is no doubt that it is the most important issue facing the world.

11/3/14 Panel

Nov 3, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC Newsman Ray Graf and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
GOP Ahead in Polls
UN Panel on Climate Change
Common Core Math
Ebola Update
Virgin Galactic

Herbert London: Virtuecrats

Oct 15, 2014

Although unannounced, there are three political parties in the United States: Democrats, Republicans and Virtuecrats. The latter is bipartisan. It includes independents and many political agnostics. What it doesn’t include are skeptics. The Virtuecrats are true believers, sure that what they are doing and marching for is right.

10/14/14 Panel

Oct 14, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Ebola Review
Global Warming Security
Deadly Guardrails
Church on Marriage
Ferguson Arrests


As the world’s leaders prepared to hold a summit on climate change at the United Nations last week, 400,000 protestors marched through the streets of New York City demanding actions – not just words.

Severe weather
By NASA/NOAA GOES Project via Wikimedia Commons

Climate change is making headlines this week. With the United Nations Climate Summit now in the rearview mirror, what does this mean for weather forecasts going forward? And here in the Great Northeast, we’re reaching the end of this year’s Atlantic hurricane season. It’s time to prepare to face that infamous northeast winter weather.

9/24/14 Panel

Sep 24, 2014

  

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Obama on ISIS
Ebola CDC Prediction
Climate Change/Obama UN

U.S. Senate

It’s estimated that up to 400,000 people converged on New York City Sunday for the People’s Climate March, held just before the UN Climate Summit, which begins today. Among those at the rally was Middlebury College scholar and environmental activist Bill McKibben. The founder of 350.org,  McKibben was one of the organizers of the People’s Climate March. He spoke with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley.

Climate change has taken center stage at today’s United Nations Climate Summit in New York City. More than 120 world leaders gathered, promising billions to finance clean energy and support resilience to climate change.

People's Climate March

Estimates vary, but up to 400,000 people converged on New York City Sunday for the People’s Climate March, including thousands of people from this region.

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