Climate Change

U.S. Senate

It’s estimated that up to 400,000 people converged on New York City Sunday for the People’s Climate March, held just before the UN Climate Summit, which begins today. Among those at the rally was Middlebury College scholar and environmental activist Bill McKibben. The founder of,  McKibben was one of the organizers of the People’s Climate March. He spoke with WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley.

Climate change has taken center stage at today’s United Nations Climate Summit in New York City. More than 120 world leaders gathered, promising billions to finance clean energy and support resilience to climate change.

People's Climate March

Estimates vary, but up to 400,000 people converged on New York City Sunday for the People’s Climate March, including thousands of people from this region.

Melody Lytle/Audubon Photography Awards

If you like hearing the loon’s call at the lake or spotting ducks, you could be out of luck in the near future. In a first-of-its-kind study, Audubon has released a comprehensive study of bird species throughout Alaska, Canada and the continental U.S. assessing fundamental climate needs for each species to survive. It found several iconic species at risk in New York.

WAMC photocomposite by Dave Lucas

New York is requiring state agencies to consider the increasing episodes of extreme weather in public works projects, industrial and commercial permits and issuing regulations.  For New York, those calculations include rising sea levels, more flooding and more severe storms.

Governor Andrew Cuomo says Monday the law is intended to create more resilient infrastructure, noting "the new reality of extreme weather" has had painful consequences for New Yorkers.

9/22/14 Panel

Sep 22, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Climate Events
Obama @ UN
Older Voters
Moscow March
White House Arrest
Captain Citrus

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

  Albany city officials held a meeting Tuesday night, hearing residents' concerns after recent flash flooding. 

An August 5th storm dumped buckets of rain over a short timeframe, putting an unprecedented strain on infrastructure and flooding many low-lying and poor drainage areas of the city.

Residents in the 9th ward turned out at New Scotland Elementary School (formerly School 19) to air their flood grievances before Mayor Kathy Sheehan and water department representatives, who said they're working on the issues.

Three years after Tropical Storm Irene tore through New York,  one upstate county has completed restoration efforts.

Irene destroyed many Greene County communities - affecting several roads and bridges. Now county officials say all repair and rebuild projects as a result of the storm have been finished.

A telephone hotline has been set up for Albany residents impacted by Tuesday's flood. 

Mayor Kathy Sheehan announced that residents can call 2-1-1 for information about and referrals to assistance in the wake of the unprecedented storm. Working with United Way, the Red Cross, local government, businesses and nonprofit organizations, the Mayor says she's making sure that citizens have access to assistance with temporary housing, food, clothing, clean-up and more.

Aftermath: Albany Flood

Aug 6, 2014
Lainie Lucas

Fast moving waters across roadways caused numerous accidents and stranded vehicles as powerful thunderstorms passed over the Capital Region Tuesday evening.