coal

  Acclaimed New York Times bestselling author Jennifer Haigh returns to the Pennsylvania town at the center of her iconic novel Baker Towers in Heat & Light, an ambitious, achingly human story of modern America and the conflicting forces at its heart—a bold, moving drama of hope and desperation, greed and power, big business and small-town families.

Forty years ago, Bakerton coal fueled the country. Then the mines closed, and the town wore away like a bar of soap. Now Bakerton has been granted a surprise third act: it sits squarely atop the Marcellus Shale, a massive deposit of natural gas.

Jennifer Haigh will be at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA tonight at 7 p.m.

James Green is a celebrated labor historian and author of the book Death in the Haymarket. His new book is The Devil is Here in These Hills, a chronicle of West Virginia’s coal miners and their fight for unionization and civil rights. The book is particularly relevant today as the arduous battle for the rights of West Virginia miners rages on. 

  Coal-producing states are often loath to discuss a move away from fossil fuels.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about his bipartisan bill with a West Virginia lawmaker.

WAMC

Targeting what they claim are the largest air polluters in Massachusetts, activists announced a campaign today to shut down coal burning power plants.  WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

      Close to 50 environmental, public health, faith based and community groups make up a new state-wide coalition  called “ Coal Free Massachusetts”  The activists staged coordinated events Wednesday in the three communities where large coal-burning power plants still operate to call for each to be shut down by the end of the decade.

 This past week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations to require oil and gas drillers to capture harmful air pollutants that escape from wells during drilling operations, and from natural gas storage facilities and pipelines.  The final rule is a first, and it's good news. But the new rules take 2 and a half years to become effective. New York can and should do better.