cold war

Jim Brown
Jim Brown Productions

In the era of glasnost, perestroika and the last days of the Cold War, music became a powerful force for change.  The new documentary Free To Rock looks at the spread of rock and roll in the 1980’s and 90’s and how it helped the Iron Curtain fall.  The film is being shown in Lake Placid this weekend and director Jim Brown explains that it took 10 years to complete.

  Hudson Valley World Affairs Council will be hosting a lecture at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum on Wednesday, September 9th featuring Tom Nichols - Professor of National Security Affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, R.I.

He will speak on "The U.S. and Russia Today: New Cold War, Hot War, or Reconciliation?” The discussion will be about US-Russian relations, focusing on the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, the conflict in Syria, the Iran nuclear deal and the future of NATO.

He is also a five-time undefeated Jeopardy! champion, and as one of the all-time top players of the game, he was invited back to play in the 2005 Ultimate Tournament of Champions.

  On two consecutive days in June 1963, in two lyrical speeches, John F. Kennedy pivots dramatically and boldly on the two greatest issues of his time: nuclear arms and civil rights. In language unheard in lily white, Cold War America, he appeals to Americans to see both the Russians and the "Negroes" as human beings.

His speech on June 10 leads to the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963; his speech on June 11 to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Based on new material -- hours of recently uncovered documentary film shot in the White House and the Justice Department, fresh interviews, and a rediscovered draft speech -- Two Days in June by Andrew Cohen captures Kennedy at the high noon of his presidency in startling, granular detail.

Stephen Gottlieb: Ukraine — The Limits Of Power

Apr 22, 2014

It's worth another look at Ukraine. Americans have taken a principled pro-democracy stand. But before we get too self-congratulatory, let's find a little perspective.

3/4/14 Panel

Mar 4, 2014

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Ukraine
Cold War Ghosts
Drug Sentencing
GOP Budget
TU Stories

   Historians generally portray the 1950s as a conservative era when anticommunism and the Cold War subverted domestic reform, crushed political dissent, and ended liberal dreams of social democracy. These years, historians tell us, represented a turn to the right, a negation of New Deal liberalism, an end to reform.

Jennifer Delton argues that, far from subverting the New Deal state, anticommunism and the Cold War enabled, fulfilled, and even surpassed the New Deal's reform agenda. Anticommunism solidified liberal political power and the Cold War justified liberal goals such as jobs creation, corporate regulation, economic redevelopment, and civil rights.

In her book, Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal, Skidmore College History Professor Jennifer Delton shows how despite President Eisenhower's professed conservatism, he maintained the highest tax rates in U.S. history, expanded New Deal programs, and supported major civil rights reforms.

Alan is joined by journalist and author Donald Connery, a World War II veteran and Harvard grad who covered the Cold War for United Press, Time, Life, NBC, and other outlets. Connery’s new book is Escape From Oblivion: A Moscow Correspondent’s Memoir of the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Peter Golden

Oct 22, 2012

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tense 13-day period in 1962 during which the U.S., Russia and Cuba balanced on the verge of war.