college

  Poster Boy is a new American musical inspired by actual events surrounding the 2010 suicide of Tyler Clementi, a college student who brought national attention to cyber-bullying, In the show, a community of gay men in an online chat room come together to discover what drove one of their own to take his life.

Directed by Olivier Award-nominee Stafford Arima with movement by Danny Mefford, Poster Boy, is in its world premiere production on the Nikos Stage at the Williamstown Theatre Festival through August 7th.

Composer and lyricist, Craig Carnelia and bookwriter Joe Tracz join us.

  After thirty-five years as a book editor in New York City, Ann Patty stopped working and moved to the country. Bored, aimless, and lost in the woods, she hoped to challenge her restless, word-loving brain by beginning a serious study of Latin at local colleges.

As she begins to make sense of Latin grammar and syntax, her studies open unexpected windows into her own life.

Her book is Living with a Dead Language: My Romance with Latin.

U.S. Senate

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer says financially distressed colleges facing potential closure should be required to tell students the school may shut down.

  Carolyn Stefanco was inaugurated as President of the College of Saint Rose in April of this year. Just a few months later, Stefanco proposed changes, including program cuts, to academic offerings at the Albany private liberal arts college as the college works to identify the best ways to reduce a $9 million deficit and boost enrollment.

Stefanco discussed the specifics of her recommendations with trustees two weeks ago. While no specific cuts or increased areas of spending were announced, a statement noted the college had refinanced its debt and lowered its borrowing costs; eliminated 40 staff and administrative positions, 23 of which were filled; eliminated contingency budgets; and reduced spending for employee benefits and other areas.

While the trustees met on the Friday before Thanksgiving, faculty, students, and alumni rallied outside to protest the cuts. To discuss the fiscal woes and future plans, we welcome Dr. Carolyn Stefanco to the RT this morning.

  In 2008, on her second night of college, Aspen Matis was raped by a fellow student. Shattered and alone, she fled to the Mexican border to begin the 2,650 mile walk along the Pacific Crest Trail, through the unforgiving desert and mountains to Canada.

Reminiscent of Alice Sebold’s - Lucky and Cheryl Strayed’s - Wild, Matis has written a searing, yet hopeful story of survival in the wake of a horrific trauma and finding acceptance, hope, and healing in nature.

Girl In The Woods is a memoir of how Aspen’s horror became her salvation…and, yes, she found her future husband by the 2,000 mile mark.

  It’s a statistic that’s sure to surprise: close to 45 percent of postsecondary students in the United States today do not enroll in college directly out of high school and many attend part-time. Following a tradition of self-improvement as old as the Republic, the “nontraditional” college student is becoming the norm.

Back to School by Mike Rose is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society and why it is so critical to support the institutions that make it possible for millions of Americans to better their lot in life.

betterloanchoice.com

Some state colleges and universities are adding graduate programs and changing their names to attract more students — and precious out-of-state tuition dollars.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Educators, philanthropists and corporate interests from across the globe were in the Adirondacks this week to seek solutions to a global skills gap.

  American higher education is at a crossroads. Cost-minded students and their families--and the public at large--are questioning the worth of a college education, even as study after study shows how important it is to economic and social mobility. And as elite institutions trim financial aid and change other business practices in search of more sustainable business models, racial and economic stratification in American higher education is only growing.

In American Higher Education in Crisis?: What Everyone Needs to Know, Goldie Blumenstyk, who has been reporting on higher education trends for 25 years, guides readers through the forces and trends that have brought the education system to this point, and highlights some of the ways they will reshape America's colleges in the years to come.

The College of Saint Rose in Albany and Fulton-Montgomery Community College in Johnstown have announced a dual admission program.

  Who gets to go to college? Who can afford it and what are you getting for your money? Is it smart to go into massive debt to get a degree? What is the future of education in America and what does that future mean for the workplace, the government, our children and colleagues, and for ourselves?

These questions around education and access come as college prices have exploded and whole generations are sinking deeper into college debt. At the same time, tech entrepreneurs and professors from some of the world’s most elite universities have been racing to revolutionize higher education with massive college courses taught—for free—online.

In The End of College: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere, education researcher and writer Kevin Carey shows how innovations in digital learning can help higher education.

2/12/15 Panel

Feb 12, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and WAMC newsman Ray Graf.

Topics include: Obama ISIS Fight, Pipeline Vote, Homeland Security Funding Split, Too Smart TV, NC Shooting, and Bob Simon.

8/26/14 Panel

Aug 26, 2014

  

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Syria Warning
Ferguson Update
VA Corruption Trial
Drawing Poor to Elite College
Emmy Awards

Race-based affirmative action had been declining as a factor in university admissions even before the recent spate of related cases arrived at the Supreme Court. Since Ward Connerly kickstarted a state-by-state political mobilization against affirmative action in the mid-1990s, the percentage of four-year public colleges that consider racial or ethnic status in admissions has fallen from 60 percent to 35 percent. Only 45 percent of private colleges still explicitly consider race, with elite schools more likely to do so, although they too have retreated.

For law professor and civil rights activist Sheryll Cashin, this isn’t entirely bad news, because as she argues, affirmative action as currently practiced does little to help disadvantaged people. In Place, Not Race, Cashin reimagines affirmative action and champions place-based policies, arguing that college applicants who have thrived despite exposure to neighborhood or school poverty are deserving of special consideration.

  America’s higher education system is failing its students. In the space of a generation, we have gone from being the best-educated society in the world to one surpassed by eleven other nations in college graduation rates.

Higher education is evolving into a caste system with separate and unequal tiers that take in students from different socio-economic backgrounds and leave them more unequal than when they first enrolled.

In Degrees of Inequality, acclaimed political scientist Suzanne Mettler explains why the system has gone so horribly wrong and why the American Dream is increasingly out of reach for so many.

    A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed that institution’s complex and contested involvement in slavery—setting off a controversy that leapt from the ivory tower to make headlines across the country.

But Brown’s troubling past was far from unique. In Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, Craig Steven Wilder, a rising star in the profession of history, lays bare uncomfortable truths about race, slavery, and the American academy.

      The Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts is boasting a brand new science center, the MCLA Center for Science and Innovation, on its campus in North Adams. The four-story, 65,000 square foot building cost more than $30 million, taking just about a year to build. The center will be the home of the chemistry, biology, physics, psychology, and environmental studies departments.

A grand opening celebration will take place early next month. In the meantime, we celebrate today with the woman behind this project for the last several years - Mary Grant, the 11th president of the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts and the first alumna of the College to serve as its president.

 Student loans and college costs are a constant worry for many Americans.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Richard Neal discusses what he says is only a short-term fix.

9/9/13 - Panel

Sep 9, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, activist and commentator Libby Post, and Ray Graf.

WAMC's Pete Seeger concert in Peekskill
Syria
DiBlasio (NY Times)
College bubble bursting (Times Union)

    Perhaps the best undefeated team in the history of college football the dramatic true story of the 1988 Notre Dame Fighting Irish and their incredible unbeaten season is told in Jerry Barca’s new book, Unbeatable: Notre Dame's 1988 Championship and the Last Great College Football Season.

8/14/13 - Panel

Aug 14, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock and the Times Union Capital Reporter, Jimmy Vielkind. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
Airlines Merger
Snowden Interview
NSA Cuts Administrators
Sex in College
NYC Mayoral Poll
Goo-goos surveying about changes to JCOPE
Subpoenas to a major real estate developer/Cuomo donor

6/13/13 - Panel

Jun 13, 2013

  Today's panelists are Alan Chartock, Ray Graf, and Ira Fusfeld. Joe Donahue moderates.

Topics include:
NSA Hacks and Leaks
Community College Graduation Rates
Hilary Clinton on Twitter
LCA Show

Listener Essay - Double Graduation

May 6, 2013

  Sharing the spotlight can be difficult, especially when it’s with your sibling. We hear these stories all the time on TV, whether it’s Serena versus Venus Williams or John and Jim Harbaugh coaching against each other in the Super Bowl.

Essayist Leighann Camarero tells us about the personal connection she has with these competitive siblings when it comes to mom and dad having to choose who to support.

wohnai/Creative Commons

Governor Peter Shumlin has unveiled a plan to get more Vermont students into college and to produce more skilled workers.

The proposal would expand the dual enrollment program to allow more high school juniors and seniors to attend college classes, for free. Students would be able to attend up to two classes at the Vermont State Colleges, the University of Vermont, and participating private institutions.

    We speak with Dave Tomar about his book, The Shadow Scholar: How I Made a Living Helping College Kids Cheat.

Flickr / Nazareth College

Planning for college is the focus of today’s program, and certified educational planner Lynell Engelmyer is in the studio this afternoon to talk more about it.

As many of us have found, securing an acceptance letter to an institution of higher learning is often only half the battle – the other half involves funding the educational experience you hope to have there. We’ll have more on this from Lynell, who helps prepare students for these aspects of the college experience. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

Photo by Kane5187/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

Dartmouth College will stop awarding credit based on Advanced Placement exam scores starting with the class of 2018.

The Ivy League school in Hanover, N.H., currently awards some credit for AP and other test scores. But faculty recently voted to end the practice because they believe AP courses are not equivalent to Dartmouth classes. Though some students have used the credit to graduate early, officials say future students will still have other ways to do that.

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society.

For over a generation, shocking cases of censorship at America’s colleges and universities have taught students the wrong lessons about living in a free society.

On this edition of Vox Pop, Lynell Engelmyer - certified educational planner with over twenty years of experience in college admissions and financial aid - joins us to talk college financial planning and admissions. WAMC’s Ray Graf hosts.

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