Flickr / Nazareth College

Planning for college is the focus of today’s program, and certified educational planner Lynell Engelmyer is in the studio this afternoon to talk more about it.

As many of us have found, securing an acceptance letter to an institution of higher learning is often only half the battle – the other half involves funding the educational experience you hope to have there. We’ll have more on this from Lynell, who helps prepare students for these aspects of the college experience. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

Photo by Kane5187/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

Dartmouth College will stop awarding credit based on Advanced Placement exam scores starting with the class of 2018.

The Ivy League school in Hanover, N.H., currently awards some credit for AP and other test scores. But faculty recently voted to end the practice because they believe AP courses are not equivalent to Dartmouth classes. Though some students have used the credit to graduate early, officials say future students will still have other ways to do that.

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society.

For over a generation, shocking cases of censorship at America’s colleges and universities have taught students the wrong lessons about living in a free society.

On this edition of Vox Pop, Lynell Engelmyer - certified educational planner with over twenty years of experience in college admissions and financial aid - joins us to talk college financial planning and admissions. WAMC’s Ray Graf hosts.

A women’s college  in Massachusetts has received a substantial financial boost from the federal government.   It will mean an overhaul of the curriculum and new services to help ensure student’s graduate.   WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

Employees of the University of Rochester are losing a major benefit: free tuition for their children who attend the college.

Administrators at the private college tell the Democrat and Chronicle that starting in 2013, children of the university's faculty and staff will no longer get free tuition.

But they won't have to pay UR's tuition of nearly $43,000. Instead, they'll pay the rate charged to attend the state's public four-year colleges, about $5,600.

The change won't affect students already enrolled at UR or who will begin college this fall.

Host Alan Chartock is joined by Wesleyan University president Michael Roth, a professor, author and historian. Roth has served as Wesleyan’s 16th president since 2007.


Students are choosing where to go to college. A college education is expensive but too many graduates come out of college without a skill set. What do they need from higher education?

Host Alan Chartock is joined by Dr. Donald Christian, newly inaugurated as the eighth president of the State University of New York at New Paltz.