Our next guest was a writer on Late Night with David Letterman for nearly 1000 episodes over seven years, starting in 1984.

He shared in three Primetime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Writing for his work on the show. Randy Cohen was the Ethicist for The New York Times for twelve years and is the host and creator of Person Place Thing, heard right here on WAMC.

  Our next guest is one of the few people who has shared a stage with David Letterman for the entire span of his 33-year long late night career.

In 1982, Will Lee became one of the original members of The World's Most Dangerous Band, the house band on NBC ' s Late Night with David Letterman. Then, he made the move with Letterman in 1993 to CBS to become a part of the Late Show with David Letterman’s CBS Orchestra with Paul Shaffer.

He is a Grammy award winner who has also performed with pretty much every major music act of the last three decades as well as with three members of The Beatles. He travels around the world with his Beatles tribute band, The Fab Faux.



   Over the years, David Letterman has given very few interviews about his life and career. In that handful, most were with his good friends and broadcasters – Regis Philbin and Larry King.

Earlier this month, Dave gave what amounted to his CBS exit interview with Dave Itzkoff of The New York Times. The piece was a Q&A and covered everything from Letterman talking about the end of his show, his legacy, his aloofness, his health and even his extortion sex scandal.

CBS/Worldwide Pants

  Gerard Mulligan has spent the majority of his professional career writing for David Letterman. Dating from Letterman’s short-lived NBC morning show, to Late Night with David Letterman, also at the Peacock Network, and running well into the  Late Show run.

Among his many duties - Gerry was a monologue writer and presented jokes to Dave daily. He also made many on-camera appearances often with Fellow Late Nighter Chris Eliot and he even played Hillary Clinton – with wig, dress and his full beard. He retired from the show in 2004. But, he has returned many times since then.

  Ever since Johnny Carson first popularized the late-night talk show in 1962 with The Tonight Show, the eleven p.m. to two a.m. comedy time slot on network television has remained an indelible part of our national culture. More than six popular late-night shows air every night of the week, and with recent major shake-ups in the industry, late-night television has never been more relevant to our public consciousness than it is today.

Jon Macks, a veteran writer for The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, takes us behind the scenes of this world for a look at what really makes these hosts the arbiters of public opinion.

Andrew Eccles

  Last week, God finally came to Studio 54 in New York City as the new comedy An Act of God began previews. For the play, God has take the form or four-time Emmy and Golden Globe Award winning actor, Jim Parsons.

Based on the critically acclaimed book The Last Testament: A Memoir by God, this new play was written by David Javerbaum (who also wrote the book and runs @TheTweetofGod Twitter account) and directed by two-time Tony Award winner Joe Mantello. It features God and two of his angels (Michael and Gabriel - in the forms of Christopher Fitzgerald and Tim Kazurinsky).

David Javerbaum is a 13-time Emmy-winning former head writer and executive producer of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He is also a Tony-nominated lyricist whose collaborations with songwriter Adam Schlesinger include the Broadway musical Cry-Baby and the Grammy-winning songs for Stephen Colbert's Christmas special The Greatest Gift of All. He created the talk show No, You Shut Up! with Henson Studios, hosted by Paul F. Tompkins for Fusion and he is currently a producer for CBS’ The Late Late Show with James Corden.

  Stand-up comedian, Cameron Esposito, will perform at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA at 8pm this coming Saturday.

Esposito has been named a "Comic to Watch" by LA Weekly, Time Out Los Angeles, Jezebel, Los Angeles Magazine and Cosmopolitan Magazine. She hosts Put Your Hands Together - a weekly stand-up showcase and podcast out of UCB in Los Angeles, and co-hosts Wham Bam Pow an action and scifi moviecast. Her recent album is entitled Same Sex Symbol.

Her bi-weekly column for The Onion’s AV Club is Who In The World Is Cameron Esposito?


   The Berkshire International Film Festival is presenting a special cast reunion and screening of the classic 1978 comedy, National Lampoon's Animal House, on Saturday night.

Members of Faber College's infamous Class of 1963 including Karen Allen, Peter Riegert, Mark Metcalf, Martha Smith, Jaime Widdows, and Judy Belushi will be in attendance following the film for a Q&A and a performance by Otis Day to complete the evening at The Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center in Great Barrington, MA.

Also in attendance will be the man who was at the helm of the film, director John Landis. Landis became famous for his work on Animal House - going on to direct such films as The Blues Brothers, An American Werewolf in London, Trading Places, Coming to America, and The Three Amigos.

  Paula Poundstone is one of our great humorists. You can hear her as a regular panelist on NPR’s weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me. She tours regularly, performing standup comedy across the country, causing Bob Zany with the Boston Globe to write: “Poundstone can regale an audience for several hours with her distinctive brand of wry, intelligent and witty comedy.”

Perhaps Paula Poundstone is best known for her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd, guaranteeing each performance is different from the last. She will be at the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall on Saturday night at 8PM.

  When he first started out in show business, Maz Jobrani endured suggestions that he spice up his stand-up act by wearing “the outfit,” fielded questions about rising gas prices, and got called an F’in Eye-ranian for being involved in the Iran hostage crisis even though he was only eight years old at the time—in fact, these things happened so often that he began to wonder: Could I be a terrorist without even knowing it?

Having emigrated with his family to the US during the Iranian Revolution, Maz spent most of his youth desperately trying to fit in with his adopted culture—whether that meant learning to play baseball or religiously watching Dallas with his female relatives. But none of his attempts at assimilation made a difference to casting directors, who only auditioned him for the role of kebab-eating, bomb-toting, extremist psychopath.