community

William W. Goldsmith is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. He is coauthor of Separate Societies: Poverty and Inequality in U.S. Cities.

In his new book, Saving Our Cities, William W. Goldsmith shows how cities can be places of opportunity rather than places with problems. With strongly revived cities and suburbs, working as places that serve all their residents, metropolitan areas will thrive, thus making the national economy more productive, the environment better protected, the citizenry better educated, and the society more reflective, sensitive, and humane.

Even as US spending on healthcare skyrockets, impoverished Americans continue to fall ill and die of preventable conditions. Although the majority of health outcomes are shaped by non-medical factors, public and private healthcare reform efforts have largely ignored the complex local circumstances that make it difficult for struggling men, women, and children to live healthier lives.

In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Dr. Prabhjot Singh argues that we must look beyond the walls of the hospital and into the neighborhoods where patients live and die to address the troubling rise in chronic disease.

Breathing Lights

Nov 23, 2016
Breathing Lights

This month and last, nightly from 6pm – 10pm, Breathing Lights has been illuminating the windows of hundreds of vacant buildings in Albany, Schenectady and Troy. Breathing Lights looks to transform abandoned structures from pockets of shadows into places of warmth. 

Concentrated in neighborhoods with high levels of vacancy, Breathing Lights was a winner of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge which engages mayors to collaborate with artists on developing innovative public art projects that enrich communities and attract visitors.

But even after the closure, there will be months of programming and events to continue the conversation surrounding the issues. To tell us more – we welcome project architect Barb Nelson, Lead Artist Adam Frelin and Judie Gilmore, the project director. 

In The Well-Tempered City, Jonathan F. P. Rose distills a lifetime of interdisciplinary research and firsthand experience into a five-pronged model for how to design and reshape our cities with the goal of equalizing their landscape of opportunity.

Rose works with cities and not-for-profits to plan and build green affordable and mixed-income housing and cultural, health, and educational centers. Recognized for creating communities that literally heal both residents and neighborhoods, Rose is one of the nation's leading thinkers on the integration of environmental, social, and economic solutions to the urban issues facing us today.

The O+ Festival is a celebration of art and music that creates a bridge to access health care for artists. O+ fosters complete physical, mental and social well-being by connecting artists directly with a coalition of health care providers and health resources, in a shared vision to nurture the individual and the community.

O+ was founded in 2010 in Kingston, NY – the idea has caught on and festivals have now taken place in cities all across the country. This year’s festival in Kingston takes place October 7th, 8th, and 9th.

To tell us about this year's highlights – we are joined by: Nurse-in-charge Shannon Light, pop-up clinic director; Rocket Scientist Micah Blumenthal, creative director and co-curator of music; and Art Witch Denise Orzo, art director.

  Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be playing their third annual gathering in Woodstock, NY this Sunday - July 31st at 12 noon. The theme will be PLAY.

The Secret City is the brainchild of impresario and Byrdcliffe Resident, Chris Wells, who moved to Woodstock three years ago and felt the small town with its cultural history, inclusiveness and love of community were a perfect setting for this tribal art gathering.

The Secret City combines art, food, music, storytelling, meditation, singing, performance and community interaction in an event that is part tent revival, part ceremony, part salon.

For their Woodstock gathering they’ll present musical guest Eric Redd, visual art by Jacinta Bunnell, roller derby troupe The Hudson Valley Horrors, food offering by LaGusta of New Paltz, a performance by Percussion Orchestra of Kingston and Energy Dance Company, a reading by Martha Frankel, songs by The Secret City Singers and The Secret City Band and a story by Chris Wells. We welcome Chris and artist Jacinta Bunnell.

This summer, The Williamstown Theatre Festival brings together professional theatre artists with Berkshire residents to create and perform new work. Born of the belief that theatre is central to understanding, building and maintaining community, this initiative invites the people of Western Massachusetts to be a part of the Festival’s creative process — not just as audience members, but on stage!

Obie Award-winning playwright Lucy Thurber puts a new spin on the Orpheus myth, set in Western Massachusetts. When Orpheus, a teenage girl, realizes that something is amiss in her neighborhood, she embarks on a treacherous journey to save her hometown.

Helmed by Festival Associate Director Laura Savia, and developed in collaboration with community partners, this World Premiere features a cast of 75 Berkshire residents performing alongside Festival actors. Performances are July 14-16 at 7:30PM and July 17 at 5PM.

  Best known of award-winning New York Times and Newsweek columns, Anna Quindlen returns with her eighth novel, Miller's Valley. 

The setting is a farming valley in Pennsylvania during the height of the Viet Nam War. Outside influences like the war and a government plan to flood the valley affect the lives of one family - and the community.

  The Proctors' Key Private Bank Broadway Series has been unveiled. The season includes An American in Paris, The Sound of Music and Cabaret among six touring musicals. Capital Rep's slate of original productions will consist of five shows, from a tribute to Janis Joplin to an adaptation of Homer's Iliad.

In another first, an offering on Capital Rep's season, Beautiful — The Carole King Musical, will be presented at Proctors and will be a touring show, not an original production mounted by Capital Rep. Subscribers to either theater will have the option of adding tickets to the touring production of Wicked, returning to Proctors for two weeks in March 2017.

There is a lot going on and we welcome CEO Philip Morris to tell us more.

  Lauren Groff returns to talk about her new novel, Fates and Furies.  Groff often writes about the tension between the individual and community. This novel shrinks community to just two, a marriage. It is told in two halves, from the opposing perspectives of a relationship.

Fates and Furies illuminates all the small ways we deceive, compromise, or cramp ourselves to sustain a partnership even a happy one, and even within so much intimacy the other partner's experience is so unknowable and mysterious. 

Farm To Canvas

Oct 21, 2015

  This Saturday, Brown’s Brewing and CiviCure will present Farm to Canvas. The goal of Farm to Canvas is to grow the audience for original artwork while supporting the restoration of Hoosick Falls’ Wood Block Opera House.

Since 1880, Wood Block has housed two extraordinary exhibition and performance spaces. CiviCure is leading the effort to restore these facilities to ensure the future of the arts in the community. The Farm to Canvas fundraiser will take place in tandem with a farm to table evening in the beautifully restored mill that houses Brown’s Brewing Company’s Walloomsac Brewery and Taproom in Hoosick Falls.

We are joined by Kelly Brown from Brown’s Brewing Co. and Barbara Sussman, Treasurer of CiviCure.

  Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we check in with the Pennsylvania Humanities Council and learn about the Chester Made Project.

The project uses the humanities to inform community dialogue and revitalization in the city of Chester, Pennsylvania.

We are joined by Laurie Zierer, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, and a Chester Made project leader.

  Martha Frankel is the executive director of the Woodstock Writers Festival, and host of the weekly show, Woodstock Writers Radio, on Radio Woodstock 100.1.

For over thirty years, Kristin Garnier has been writing and performing her stories and songs live on stages, public radio stations, and in the echoing hallways of the Parisian Metro.

Together, Martha and Kristin present StorySlams and this Saturday they’re staging one of their events at The Bearsville Theatre in Woodstock, NY. The StorySlam will feature 9 storytellers in competition, speaking on the theme “I Believe in the Power Of…” – there will be music and merriment.

Martha Frankel and Kristin Garnier join us.

  The 3rd Annual Winter Hoot at The Ashokan Center in Olive Bridge, NY is this weekend!

With music, dancing, food, film, and nature activities for all ages - the Winter Hoot welcomes the community for a spirit-raising good time in these cold and blustery days.

Musicians performing this year include Elizabeth Mitchell and You are My Flower, David Wax Museum, Josh Ritter, Downhill Strugglers with John Cohen, Uncle Rock, Jay Ungar and Molly Mason - and others!

Here to tell us more are folk roots duo - and friends of the show - Mike and Ruthy!

  Through the stories of prisoners and their families, including her own family’s experiences, Maya Schenwar shows in her book, Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn't Work and How We Can Do Better, how the institution that locks up 2.3 million Americans and decimates poor communities of color is shredding the ties that, if nurtured, could foster real collective safety.

Beacon's Hannukah Honors Community

Dec 23, 2014
Courtesy of Donna Mikkelsen

Tonight is the last night of the second year of Beacon’s Hannukah celebration, honoring different sectors of the community each night. The celebration is held at the corner of a busy intersection, and this year the rabbi had an added activity – a trip to the White House.

Beacon Hebrew Alliance and BeaconArts teamed up to celebrate Illumin8tion: Lighting Up Our Community for Eight Nights of Hannukah at the Beacon bicycle menorah. The candles are bicycle wheels, strung with lights. Brent Spodek is Rabbi of Beacon Hebrew Alliance.

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on The Roundtable entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we’ll speak with MASS Humanites about their Reading Frederick Douglass project.

We welcome Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs, Mass Humanities and David Harris, Managing Director of the Charles Hamilton Houseton Institute for Race and Equality at Harvard Law School.

    Letters From Sandy Hook-Newtown To The World is a deeply heartfelt collection of original letters written by members of the Sandy Hook-Newtown community, giving the world a simple and honest view into their lives.

Since the tragic events on December 14, 2012, the community has been shown a tremendous amount of love and compassion from all over the world in so many different forms. This book is a small offering from the people of Sandy Hook-Newtown, letting you know who they are and have always been.

    Flying Deer Nature Center is a wilderness school in New Lebanon, NY that has been connecting children and adults to nature and community since 1996. They offer school programs, programming for homeschooled children, adult programs in animal tracking, bird language, women’s retreats and more.

Executive Director Michelle Apland and Programs Director Devin Franklin join us to tell us more.

It is a troubling time for one of New York’s oldest public radio stations.

The last decade has been touch-and-go for WBAI, which became non-commercial and listener-supported when Pacifica bought it in 1960. The station played a pivotal role in 60s counterculture, pioneering “free-style” progressive radio, with a coverage area that blanketed New York City and radiated 70 miles beyond.

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight MASS Humanities and specifically we’ll talk about Reading Frederick Douglass. Our guests this morning are Pleun Bouricius, Assistant Director, Mass Humanities and Don Quinn Kelley, Founding Co-Chair Lift Ev'ry Voice Festival.

Liza Donnelly

   The Rhinebeck and Red Hook arts communities are hosting the 10th annual Art Along the Hudson Spring Kick-off Media Event, on Wednesday May 15th.

The purpose of this AAH event is to bring together business owners, elected officials, artists, arts patrons and the media with a focus on the many and varied cultural opportunities available and how they generate economic growth.

Over $2 million in grant funding has been awarded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to support a wide variety of community-based initiatives, from public safety to information technology. 

The 2nd round of the Community Innovation Challenge Grants were announced this week to support expansion and regionalization of a slew of community programs across the Bay State. Lieutenant Governor Timothy Murray says that the $2.25M round of funding is important for solidifying important programs, but will also save cities and towns money in the long-term.

Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, Bringing Decision Making Back Home is a new book that chronicles the ways in which ordinary people have mobilized to find local solutions to local problems. It invites us to bring the advantages of "slow" to our community decision-making.

Today marks 11 years since terrorists attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. It was the worst terrorist attack ever on U.S. soil. And so, this anniversary is set aside as a day of remembrance and service.

On a 360 acre working organic farm just outside Hudson, NY - Triform Camphill Community offers a therapeutic community environment to young adults with autism, downs syndrome and a variety of developmental disabilities and physical disabilities for over 30 years. On Sunday, May 20th, Triform Camphill Community Hosts their 10th Annual Benefit Concert Featuring The Triform Student Bell Choir and The Hudson Valley Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet Performing “Peter and the Wolf”.

The Woman's Club of Albany

Apr 25, 2012

The Women's Club of Albany was founded over a century ago and to this day organizes women the Capital District in their civic, literary, and charitable endeavors. We welcome Fran Altshuler (immediate past President), Charlotte Prior (current President), and Monique Wahba (Vice President) to the show to tell us more.